Author Topic: "WiFi X"  (Read 423 times)

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Offline steve30

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"WiFi X"
« on: May 23, 2020, 08:50:10 am »
I just got this 5 minute long advert on Youtube prior to watching an EEVBlog video, so I thought it was worth posting here.

It claims that ISPs have a 'dirty secret'; basically traffic shaping, and slow people down in the evenings. Well, traffic shaping in ISPs isn't really a secret. The video shows what appears to be a 'WiFi Repeater' which will improve the range (fair enough), but also claims to bypass this ISP traffic shaping  :bullshit:.

Here's the website: https://get-wifi-x.com/
 

Offline AVGresponding

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Re: "WiFi X"
« Reply #1 on: May 23, 2020, 10:34:41 am »
Probably just a repeater, which will give a speed boost in poor signal areas of your house I suppose.

I don't see how it's possible to bypass ISP speed controls when it's clearly routing through the existing hub anyway   :-//
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Offline Raj

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Re: "WiFi X"
« Reply #2 on: May 23, 2020, 11:16:46 am »
Probably just a repeater, which will give a speed boost in poor signal areas of your house I suppose.

I don't see how it's possible to bypass ISP speed controls when it's clearly routing through the existing hub anyway   :-//

unless the ISP is slowing specific sites and these hubs are making other's hub become their vpn exit nodes  >:D (just kidding)

a local cache server would definitely speed up frequently visited pages btw.
 

Online blueskull

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Re: "WiFi X"
« Reply #3 on: May 23, 2020, 11:41:22 am »
My guess is it is a multiple simultaneous dial up connection device.

Some ISPs limit speed by dial up instances, so their server only handles one type of speed limitation.

To prevent users from dialing more than they paid for, ISPs usually offer pppoe to Ethernet converter (built with coax/fiber modem in the same box).

I guess this device is a pppoe client that bypasses the internal pppoe of modem and dials more connections than you paid for.
 

Offline madires

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Re: "WiFi X"
« Reply #4 on: May 23, 2020, 11:49:57 am »
Slow internet access in the evening is mostly caused by lots of users enjoying internet content at the same time and overbooking by the ISP. No need for the ISP to spend much effort in managing complex traffic shaping rules across the network. ;)

Circumventing traffic shaping is possible when the ISP did a bad job in configuring QoS for VoIP or other services, i.e. if they only check the DiffServ bits in the IP packet to move a packet to the fast track queue. If they also check for ports and/or IP addresses then it won't work. My guess is that WiFi X simply overwrites the DiffServ bits, something a SOHO router (OpenWRT is great for that) can do also.

BTW, it's feasible to offer internet access with user driven QoS and corresponding billing. >:D
 

Offline Jeroen3

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Re: "WiFi X"
« Reply #5 on: May 23, 2020, 12:23:42 pm »
I'm not capable to create more than one pppoe with my ISP. It's point-to-point and the remote router doesn't accept more than 2 (one for ipv4 and one for ipv6).

Well, you can bypass traffic shaping by masking the packet signature, but you have to unmask it somewhere. This is what they all a VPN.
 

Offline madires

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Re: "WiFi X"
« Reply #6 on: May 23, 2020, 12:24:15 pm »
Some ISPs limit speed by dial up instances, so their server only handles one type of speed limitation.

To prevent users from dialing more than they paid for, ISPs usually offer pppoe to Ethernet converter (built with coax/fiber modem in the same box).

I guess this device is a pppoe client that bypasses the internal pppoe of modem and dials more connections than you paid for.

Usually ISPs/telcos limit throughput at the data link layer because it's the most simple and effective way. At the network layer (IP in this case) it's harder since it will increase the router load. And RADIUS takes care about users trying to establish multiple PPPoE links.
 

Offline madires

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Re: "WiFi X"
« Reply #7 on: May 23, 2020, 02:14:39 pm »
I'm not capable to create more than one pppoe with my ISP. It's point-to-point and the remote router doesn't accept more than 2 (one for ipv4 and one for ipv6).

That setup is a bit strange, since PPP is designed to support multiple protocols in one session. So running IPv4 and IPv6 in one PPPoE link is fully supported. Of course, you can run a PPPoE link for each protocol, but it's uncommon and needs to be supported by the ISP.

Side note: An initial intention of PPPoE was that each PC in a LAN could have its own internet access via a shared DSL modem.

Well, you can bypass traffic shaping by masking the packet signature, but you have to unmask it somewhere. This is what they all a VPN.

... and the VPN traffic ends up in the same "best effort" queue as any other traffic. ;D
 

Online blueskull

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Re: "WiFi X"
« Reply #8 on: May 23, 2020, 02:21:56 pm »
Usually ISPs/telcos limit throughput at the data link layer because it's the most simple and effective way.

Not here. ISPs here offer cheap/free bandwidth (for mobile) and fast traffic (for landline) for targeted IPs like certain video sites, which they pay the ISPs separately to gain competition advantages.
 

Offline Jeroen3

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Re: "WiFi X"
« Reply #9 on: May 23, 2020, 02:42:10 pm »
The strange pppoe setup is probably because it is the only provider that supports ipv6 in the netherlands.
In what traffic shaping group you end up with the vpn depends on how you mask the traffic.
 

Offline madires

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Re: "WiFi X"
« Reply #10 on: May 23, 2020, 03:17:01 pm »
The strange pppoe setup is probably because it is the only provider that supports ipv6 in the netherlands.

Just one? :palm: Because of the lack of IPv4 addresses we already have IPv6-only servers/services.

In what traffic shaping group you end up with the vpn depends on how you mask the traffic.

... depends on what your ISP does or supports. They can overwrite any of your DiffServ settings if they like to.
 

Offline NiHaoMike

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Re: "WiFi X"
« Reply #11 on: May 24, 2020, 08:53:46 pm »
In some cases, you actually could get greater bandwidth by running many streams in parallel, usually when the limit is something other than the line to your house. (If you're getting close to the advertised bandwidth, such a device is unlikely to increase it.) Then there's blocking ads so they don't waste bandwidth...
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