Author Topic: The Autodesk Eagle edition  (Read 126688 times)

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Offline Kjelt

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Re: The Autodesk Eagle edition
« Reply #250 on: January 25, 2017, 08:11:00 am »
I clicked  the button and went to the shopping cart.  Sorry @Kjelt, looks like it's EAGLE Premium only.
Bummer I wanted to give them the benefit of doubt.
I also clicked on my email, it says $100 per year which today is €93 due to the Trumpthing ;) .
Ok go to order.
€93.- changes suddenly to €110.- ($118)  :o ex 21% VAT totals to  €133 ($142) :scared:
That is the same amount as I spent three years ago for the perpetual hobby license with 6 layers and 100x160mm2 capability.
Now they want this each and every year, yeah right, it feels like the mob enters my home (we want you to pay each month for protection)  ;)
 

Offline ebastler

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Re: The Autodesk Eagle edition
« Reply #251 on: January 25, 2017, 10:00:18 am »
I received an email today:
Quote
Hello Eagle user,
If you haven’t heard the good news by now, Autodesk EAGLE is available through our new EAGLE Subscription. No more having to find funds for the next upgrade. Here’s how it works:
1. Pay. Just a simple yearly subscription to get started.
2. Save. Get every new update at no extra cost.
3. Make. Create anything with the newest PCB design technologies.
We’re all really excited about the future of EAGLE and hope you can be a part of it. For staying with us over the years, here’s 50% off your first year of an EAGLE Subscription.
At only $250 per year, a subscription works out at less than your daily cup of coffee and it’ll boost your productivity more than the caffeine will!

I clicked  the button and went to the shopping cart.  Sorry @Kjelt, looks like it's EAGLE Premium only.

No, the discount seems to apply for the Standard edition as well. The  link in the email takes you straight to a shopping cart which already contains the Premium edition. But I could remove that from the cart, go back to the main site, put a Standard edition into the cart, and was offered the 50% discount as well. I did not follow through with purchasing the subscription however, so there might still be some last-minute catch in the process.
 

Offline rob77

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Re: The Autodesk Eagle edition
« Reply #252 on: January 25, 2017, 10:01:39 am »
are we that far with miniaturisation that 8mm x 10mm board is enough to try the new eagle ?  :-DD :-DD :-DD
they say 80mm2 routing area in tghe free version... 80mm2 is roughly the footprint of a DIP8  :-DD
they really should pay more attention to the PR texts :D

 

Online nazcalines

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Re: The Autodesk Eagle edition
« Reply #253 on: January 25, 2017, 10:29:52 am »
I hate recurring software fees as much as anybody, but $65/mo beats $1700 upfront.

In my case, I don't use the autorouter, so it was $1145. At $65/month it would take 1.5 years to break even with the old price and after that free to use for as long as I care to. After 4-5 years, thousands of dollars in savings vs renting. The old Cadsoft would even discount your upgrade!

I just don't understand why, as annoying as it is, people think a business is going to drop $30MM or whatever it was in exchange for no new revenue. Things just don't work that way.

It's not our problem they bought it for $30MM or whatever. It's on them to produce compelling features at a price point that makes sense, and so far I'm not seeing it. Maybe they will get there eventually.
 

Offline Stupid Beard

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Re: The Autodesk Eagle edition
« Reply #254 on: January 25, 2017, 10:34:03 am »
Hey Jorge,
How much is the discount, how long will it be available for and does it apply to the paid hobbyist license?

Hi Beard,
I'm not allowed to say the amount on forums and as far as how long the only thing I can say is that it's limited time.

That's a strange policy. Not sure whether this has been answered already, but anyway, I got a promotional email with the details from Autodesk today, and I don't see what should prevent me from sharing the details:

AutoCAD are offering a 50% discount on the first-year subscription, which seems to apply for buying renting either the new "EAGLE standard" or the "EAGLE premium" version. I currently have the Make version 7.6. Strangely, the email does not state for how long this offer is valid.

Thanks. I have an eagle license and I got the original launch email, but no email about the discount. Odd.
 

Offline madires

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Re: The Autodesk Eagle edition
« Reply #255 on: January 25, 2017, 11:17:11 am »
And shouldn't that "At only $250 per year" really be "At only $250 for the first year only"?  If I wait a year before subscribing, I'll actually save $500 instead...

So Autodesks sales argument is "save money by spending more" :popcorn:
 

Offline rob77

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Re: The Autodesk Eagle edition
« Reply #256 on: January 25, 2017, 11:50:29 am »
Thanks. I have an eagle license and I got the original launch email, but no email about the discount. Odd.

probably they sending those out in batches... i have only the Make edition license (the non commercial for 160Euros) and received the mail with the offer - but the link in the mail takes me to the premium version.. despite the fact that i currently have a non-commercial license.
 

Offline madires

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Re: The Autodesk Eagle edition
« Reply #257 on: January 25, 2017, 11:54:45 am »
It's also going to be interesting watching this develop. I'm not entirely convinced that Eagle is going to survive this given how thoroughly they've misunderstood the current user base (which is the best thing Eagle has going for it). On the other hand, they might. They certainly have their users by the balls. I wonder how many actually follow through and do the enormous amount of work to get off Eagle.

Considering the user base I'd assume that there won't be much users moving to the subscription model. Eagle is a semi-professional EDA package and the users are hobbyists, makers and SMEs. With the subscription model most of them will simply turn around and leave. Making Eagle into a first class EDA doesn't work either because there's Altium and so on. Companies using those EDA packages won't suddenly move to Eagle. If Autodesk want's Eagle to be a viable product they have to stay with the current user base. This leads to two possible routes Autodesk can take, either return to non-subscription or drop Eagle (stop development and sales or sell the Eagle business further on). Either way Autotesk has created so much uncertainty that Eagle is badly damaged.
 

Offline IanJ

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Re: The Autodesk Eagle edition
« Reply #258 on: January 25, 2017, 12:12:28 pm »
It's also going to be interesting watching this develop. I'm not entirely convinced that Eagle is going to survive this given how thoroughly they've misunderstood the current user base (which is the best thing Eagle has going for it). On the other hand, they might. They certainly have their users by the balls. I wonder how many actually follow through and do the enormous amount of work to get off Eagle.
Considering the user base I'd assume that there won't be much users moving to the subscription model. Eagle is a semi-professional EDA package and the users are hobbyists, makers and SMEs. With the subscription model most of them will simply turn around and leave. Making Eagle into a first class EDA doesn't work either because there's Altium and so on. Companies using those EDA packages won't suddenly move to Eagle. If Autodesk want's Eagle to be a viable product they have to stay with the current user base. This leads to two possible routes Autodesk can take, either return to non-subscription or drop Eagle (stop development and sales or sell the Eagle business further on). Either way Autotesk has created so much uncertainty that Eagle is badly damaged.

Hi all,

I don't think necessarily that folks will leave Eagle......I think for the time being they will just skip an upgrade and see what develops over the next year or so. The economy is weak around the globe anyways so the chance for SME's etc to defer any upgrade may be worth doing. EaglePcb V6 and V7 still work fine and can still tackle anything V8 can do.
The issue is that this is exactly what Autodesk won't want to happen..............
IMO, if the subscription model is here to stay then Autodesk need to put some serious work into the software and step it up a few notches. Just think, not only is there KiCad, there's also CircuitStudio and CircuitMaker out there now also.
Problem is, the longer Autodesk take to mess around will make it all the harder for them. I wonder if direction is lacking within them already?

Just my opinion.

Ian.
Ian Johnston
www.ianjohnston.com
Manufacturer of the PDVS2 & PDVS2mini
 

Offline ebastler

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Re: The Autodesk Eagle edition
« Reply #259 on: January 25, 2017, 12:39:10 pm »
I don't think necessarily that folks will leave Eagle......I think for the time being they will just skip an upgrade and see what develops over the next year or so. The economy is weak around the globe anyways so the chance for SME's etc to defer any upgrade may be worth doing. EaglePcb V6 and V7 still work fine and can still tackle anything V8 can do.

The issue is that this is exactly what Autodesk won't want to happen..............
IMO, if the subscription model is here to stay then Autodesk need to put some serious work into the software and step it up a few notches. Just think, not only is there KiCad, there's also CircuitStudio and CircuitMaker out there now also.
Problem is, the longer Autodesk take to mess around will make it all the harder for them. I wonder if direction is lacking within them already?

I agree. Waiting for a year or so is certainly the approach I personally intend to take. If Autodesk keeps developing and publishing relevant enhancements to Eagle, I might be willing to switch to a subscription model and help fund that development. But I have no rush to upgrade from version 7.x, so I will watch for a while.

Essentially, Autodesk will have to impress me with upgrades that make the commitment to regular subscription payments worthwhile. And they will have to gain my trust and convince me that they will keep improving Eagle in the long run, because I am making a bet on continued development by committing to continued subscription payments.

Of course, on the "gaining trust" front it does not help that Autodesk have forgotten about their "Eagle is not going subscription" statement within less than half a year. So how are they going to convince us that they will keep investing in Eagle development for years to come?

Speculation/conspiracy theory: I would not be surprised if Eagle 9.0 brings another change of file formats, which conveniently breaks compatibility of version 7 with newly created files. Trying to force the stubborn users of version 7 to upgrade, and preventing disappointed users of 9.x from cancelling their subscriptions and falling back onto their archived version 7 (if the updates should become less frequent or less relevant in the future)...
 

Offline pa3weg

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Re: The Autodesk Eagle edition
« Reply #260 on: January 25, 2017, 01:01:26 pm »
Considering the user base I'd assume that there won't be much users moving to the subscription model. Eagle is a semi-professional EDA package and the users are hobbyists, makers and SMEs. With the subscription model most of them will simply turn around and leave. Making Eagle into a first class EDA doesn't work either because there's Altium and so on. Companies using those EDA packages won't suddenly move to Eagle. If Autodesk want's Eagle to be a viable product they have to stay with the current user base. This leads to two possible routes Autodesk can take, either return to non-subscription or drop Eagle (stop development and sales or sell the Eagle business further on). Either way Autotesk has created so much uncertainty that Eagle is badly damaged.

This is exactly one of the points. I think Altium can start thanking Autodesk already!
We are an SME, and if we will not continue working with EAGLE (which looks extremely likely) we will most probably be looking a notch up (Altium) and not a notch down (KiCad). We may even financially support KiCad through the CERN donation scheme to make that better. If we are spending money anyway, why not make the word a bit better!
Yes: SMEs have values other than money. I would even spend a tiny bit more if the whole world could benefit from it.

I don't think necessarily that folks will leave Eagle......I think for the time being they will just skip an upgrade and see what develops over the next year or so. The economy is weak around the globe anyways so the chance for SME's etc to defer any upgrade may be worth doing. EaglePcb V6 and V7 still work fine and can still tackle anything V8 can do.

Correct. We will defer the decision, but Autodesk has already put their scoring in a trade off on a negative number. The thing is, they are currently displaying behaviour that pisses off people. And that effect lasts. once you make the decision to leave, that is not easily undone.

I hate recurring software fees as much as anybody, but $65/mo beats $1700 upfront.

In my case, I don't use the autorouter, so it was $1145. At $65/month it would take 1.5 years to break even with the old price and after that free to use for as long as I care to. After 4-5 years, thousands of dollars in savings vs renting. The old Cadsoft would even discount your upgrade!

For SMEs with more licenses, its tenfold in price increase at best. I am looking at between 10x and 15x

I don't think anybody is against Autodesk making an honest buck.  But I'm pretty sure a lot of people feel like they're now being (or will be) held hostage.  IMHO, you're trying to turn an emotional issue into a logical one by discounting the emotion.  ;)  I know, I know, engineers don't deal well with emotion. :box: :scared: :-DD

I don't think this is an emotional issue at all. Sure, people are upset, but their fundamental concerns are based on logical reasons why this is a big step backwards for users.

It definitely appears that this change is designed to turn the de-facto standard hobbyist/small business tool (which includes a lot of personal investment form the user base) into a cash cow. Sure Autodesk apologists and salesman are claiming that they are going to turn Eagle into a world class package, but the fact is they are asking people to pay them today in the hope that they will deliver on a vague, someday-maybe promise (which presumably new users will be able to get for the same price as those who subsidize this development with a current subscription).

Further, the user base doesn't want a world class package. They bought into Eagle because they wanted an affordable package that was more useable than something like KiCad.

To be clear, I really don't care. I never have been nor will I ever be an Eagle user (KiCad for me, thanks). I'm just here because I think this is an interesting discussion.

It's also going to be interesting watching this develop. I'm not entirely convinced that Eagle is going to survive this given how thoroughly they've misunderstood the current user base (which is the best thing Eagle has going for it). On the other hand, they might. They certainly have their users by the balls. I wonder how many actually follow through and do the enormous amount of work to get off Eagle.

Companies are ran by people, not robots. So yes, there is some sentiment and emotion. Really simple. I also do not buy from that company that is running those annoying ads on TV. Even if I would need their product. I would settle for slightly less to avoid this annoying company.
Autodesk has so far alienated the ?majority? of their userbase. A bit more open communication could have saved them a lot of users. We may have considered Autodesk if they did not outright lie about their intentions and at least informed their existing userbase about their plans. God forbid, they might even do a survey to assess the needs!

Regarding the argument that programmers need a steady income: I understand this argument. it makes sense. However, great people make great software, and great software is bought by people. also if it has another licensing model.
I can not help but feel sorry for the poor programmers, who now have to code a tool for an angry user base, and maybe are even implementing stuff they are not proud of because some company hot shot wants them to. I can not speak for the CadSoft team, but at the end of the day, you want to be proud of your product.
If the customers cannot sustain your business, something is wrong.
Thank you to any CadSoft people. If you read this, thank you for all your work over the past 29 years!

And lastly:
I don't think we will make people understand the aversion for cloud based, network connected, subscription based, whizzbang, marketing crap software. That is not anyones fault. Its a difference in opinion or policy. Some people can not understand why people want A or B. if people want A, you can try and convince them of B. but if at the end of the day they want or require A, just serve them A or take your loss. Fine.

Edit: clarified that cloud based internet connected stuff may be a hard no based on policy, not opninion
« Last Edit: January 25, 2017, 01:04:21 pm by pa3weg »
 
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Offline madires

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Re: The Autodesk Eagle edition
« Reply #261 on: January 25, 2017, 01:35:06 pm »
I agree. Waiting for a year or so is certainly the approach I personally intend to take. If Autodesk keeps developing and publishing relevant enhancements to Eagle, I might be willing to switch to a subscription model and help fund that development. But I have no rush to upgrade from version 7.x, so I will watch for a while.

Users observing and waiting don't create revenue for Autodesk. Maybe they have to see a huge drop in Eagle revenue first to get the message.

Following your speculation, they could tout 9.0 being the best Eagle version ever and double subscription fees for adding a few features. This is another big problem with subscriptions when you can't simply move to another service/software.
 

Offline cx05

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Re: The Autodesk Eagle edition
« Reply #262 on: January 25, 2017, 02:01:07 pm »
This is really bad news. I think the subscription model will also affect the education sector. I'm working at a university and so far we used Eagle for teaching EE students PCB design. They would also use it for their Bachelor and Master thesis, if required.
The old model made it easy for us to just tell them to download the free version and start working with it. When writing the thesis, they would often start with the free version and get a license key once the project had outgrown the free version. For this we have a pool of several licenses, which we updated every once in a while, when the new features made sense for us.

Now we need either to distribute the old free version (not sure whether this is legal, though I see nothing in the license that forbids it) or tell the students to get an Autodesk account. I'm not sure whether we are legally allowed to do so, since we would be forcing them to hand their personal data to a cooperation, just to complete a course. Since Autodesk is in the US and we are in the EU, this might be a big deal due to privacy concerns.

Additionally, since Eagle was the best viable option for an entry level PCB solution, it made sense to teach students how to use eagle. If companies are turning away from Eagle to more expensive packages, we can either follow, which would be costly, or move to the open source alternatives, i.e. KiCAD.

To make matters even worse, up to now, we were also using Eagle for our research projects. I doubt we will invest our hard earned project money in subscriptions that are running out once there is a gap between projects. Makes more sense to buy a perpetual license from the big players instead. We already have a few Altium seats for demanding PCBs, so this seems the way to go for us. Only downside is that we now have more incompatibilities between student and staff projects.

No matter how this episode ends, I don't feel very assured that teaching Eagle to students is a good idea in the foreseeable future. It's hard to switch for the next semester, so we might use the old version, however I don't think that this is a reasonable solution in the long run.

Well done Autodesk. By not trusting your users (i.e. requiring a login, no more perpetual licenses) you will ultimately lose young engineers, which up to now, were trained at no cost to you how to use your software.
I think both the big ECAD players and KiCAD will become more popular at universities. As far as KiCAD is concerned, this might be long overdue.
« Last Edit: January 25, 2017, 02:09:54 pm by cx05 »
 
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Offline iaeen

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Re: The Autodesk Eagle edition
« Reply #263 on: January 25, 2017, 02:11:31 pm »
Hi all,

I don't think necessarily that folks will leave Eagle......I think for the time being they will just skip an upgrade and see what develops over the next year or so. The economy is weak around the globe anyways so the chance for SME's etc to defer any upgrade may be worth doing. EaglePcb V6 and V7 still work fine and can still tackle anything V8 can do.
The issue is that this is exactly what Autodesk won't want to happen..............
IMO, if the subscription model is here to stay then Autodesk need to put some serious work into the software and step it up a few notches. Just think, not only is there KiCad, there's also CircuitStudio and CircuitMaker out there now also.
Problem is, the longer Autodesk take to mess around will make it all the harder for them. I wonder if direction is lacking within them already?

Just my opinion.

Ian.

I agree this is the most likely short-term outcome, but I don't think this position is going to last. At least in the hobbyists side of the equation, new people are going to enter the market (me for example) that now don't have the option to be grandfathered into the old license. These people will now consider alternatives much more closely than they had to in the past. As that population grows, the perception that "everyone uses Eagle" is going to fade. IMO, this perception is the most valuable thing that Eagle has going for it (again, from the hobbyists perspective).
 

Offline latigid on

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Re: The Autodesk Eagle edition
« Reply #264 on: January 25, 2017, 02:17:03 pm »
The problem they're facing is there is currently no reason to update, the "V8" release even looks quite buggy atm.

-- There's no reason for Pro licencees, as they already have a perpetual version of the same thing
-- There's no reason for "Maker" licencees, as they lose two routing layers for $100/year (+VAT)
-- There COULD BE a reason for those on freeware or basic commercial licences if they want a bit more area/permission to sell what they make. The area software cripple is much more flexible than fixed dimensions, but apart from time/library investments, I suspect these folks would look into KiCAD instead.

I'm struggling to imagine the thinking behind this. How does AUTODESK convince new signups that there's any merit in switching? A better idea would have been to properly implement the features requested since V5, to provide some trust that they're truly working on making it better.

Can't put lipstick on a pig, can't polish a turd etc. The codebase for EAGLE is super old now, and if the reason for lack of tangible improvements is that the structure is so weak that adding features makes the thing fall over, then why on earth didn't they just poach the design team and start from scratch? Trying to leverage the userbase? A forewarning might have been in the sheer number of Linux/GNU users and how they normally like their software models... also: we're talking about the maker/hacker community here, and how instrumental they've been in contributing bug reports, ULP scripts etc.
 
Someone else said something like, it's a bastard, but it's MY bastard! I know the quirks and limitations. But more importantly, I can get around many of them, e.g. limited pad shapes = add copper and shush the DRC. No slots = play with the Milling layer. No design blocks = import drawing (there was even a way before they added a File menu).

They need to do a helluva lot before I'll be convinced. It's just sad that my investment will not be going towards development and I need to cash in again for anything new. The trouble is, the newly promised features will break workflows of the oldtimers, and this is happening already. So what's the benefit?

 

Offline plazma

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Re: The Autodesk Eagle edition
« Reply #265 on: January 25, 2017, 03:01:28 pm »


This is really bad news. I think the subscription model will also affect the education sector. I'm working at a university and so far we used Eagle for teaching EE students PCB design. They would also use it for their Bachelor and Master thesis, if required.
The old model made it easy for us to just tell them to download the free version and start working with it. When writing the thesis, they would often start with the free version and get a license key once the project had outgrown the free version..........

Now the full version is free for students!

I wonder how hard it would have been for a SW company as big as Autodesk to write a decent program from scratch.
 

Offline pa3weg

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Re: The Autodesk Eagle edition
« Reply #266 on: January 25, 2017, 03:11:51 pm »
I wonder how hard it would have been for a SW company as big as Autodesk to write a decent program from scratch.

Its not a matter of manpower and money, its a matter of understanding lay-out.
That could take autodesk quite long, as it is not easy to understand what the lay-out process is like if you do not have engineers that know.

This is why they have bought CadSoft. They buy the expertise, so they do not have to spend huge money to learn the hard way.
Even if they discontinue EAGLE, they will still have the people that made it. (Or not, if they are also pissed off)
Or possibly a well documented codebase (with quirks)
 
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Offline cx05

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Re: The Autodesk Eagle edition
« Reply #267 on: January 25, 2017, 03:26:49 pm »
Now the full version is free for students!
As I explained, free isn't good enough, as long as they want the personal data from students.
Sure that is Ok when a student wants to get the software for private use, but when students are required to use the software to complete an university course, things start to get difficult (at least where I live).
We legally cannot and ethically will not force them to register with Autodesk to get through a course. So the free version without registration and with more limitations was in fact superior for us, compared to the new student account they are offering.
Not sure whether they will change that, but this is an issue I expect a company to find out before they completely change the license model. And since they made this change without any official warning or announcement, there's little time for them to react.
 

Offline iaeen

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Re: The Autodesk Eagle edition
« Reply #268 on: January 25, 2017, 04:00:27 pm »
Now the full version is free for students!
As I explained, free isn't good enough, as long as they want the personal data from students.
Sure that is Ok when a student wants to get the software for private use, but when students are required to use the software to complete an university course, things start to get difficult (at least where I live).
We legally cannot and ethically will not force them to register with Autodesk to get through a course. So the free version without registration and with more limitations was in fact superior for us, compared to the new student account they are offering.
Not sure whether they will change that, but this is an issue I expect a company to find out before they completely change the license model. And since they made this change without any official warning or announcement, there's little time for them to react.

Really? Wow, German universities really have their stuff together!

In the US, I was forced to create an account to submit homework online with virtually every course I took. These invariably required a single use keycode that came with the (new) textbook. It was sad to see the universities so compliant with the publishers thinly veiled attempt to destroy the second hand textbook market.

Now that I think about it, the situation isn't that different form what Autodesk is trying to do here. The only difference is that Autodesk doesn't have Eagle users at their mercy quite as much as the universities/publishers do...
 

Offline pa3weg

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Re: The Autodesk Eagle edition
« Reply #269 on: January 25, 2017, 04:59:25 pm »
In the US, I was forced to create an account to submit homework online with virtually every course I took. These invariably required a single use keycode that came with the (new) textbook. It was sad to see the universities so compliant with the publishers thinly veiled attempt to destroy the second hand textbook market.

Now that I think about it, the situation isn't that different form what Autodesk is trying to do here. The only difference is that Autodesk doesn't have Eagle users at their mercy quite as much as the universities/publishers do...
That sounds quite bad.
It's EU laws that tries to limit this.
A school can ask you to register, but if you do not agree with the terms, they can not discriminate you or anything.
Also, in my uni, a lot of classes used to have two schedules, depending on what book you were using. So basically telling you to solve problems 4 or 5 in one book OR 3 and 6 in another. That way, you could buy the older version without penalty.
 

Offline Retep

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Re: The Autodesk Eagle edition
« Reply #270 on: January 25, 2017, 05:52:05 pm »
Can't put lipstick on a pig, can't polish a turd etc.
Wrong on both counts:

 

Offline cx05

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Re: The Autodesk Eagle edition
« Reply #271 on: January 25, 2017, 08:08:40 pm »
Since I'm not a user of any other Autodesk products, I took a look at the companies history (apart from Autocad). This is a real eye opener: http://www.stefandidak.com/2014/03/autodesk-the-metastasizing-cancer-of-the-3d-world/
 

Offline XFDDesign

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Re: The Autodesk Eagle edition
« Reply #272 on: January 25, 2017, 09:28:38 pm »
Since I'm not a user of any other Autodesk products, I took a look at the companies history (apart from Autocad). This is a real eye opener: http://www.stefandidak.com/2014/03/autodesk-the-metastasizing-cancer-of-the-3d-world/

Once you cut through the rambling, what you find is that Autodesk is essentially the stereotypical headless corporation. A big corp need not be straight out of Dilbert, but to be well run it requires actual leadership and an internal structure with responsibility (and consequences). Once the disease of Management gets in, it pushes out the leadership and replicates to fill in the void. Then, you eventually get a large corp where, on the inside, everyone points to everyone else as being the cause for things failing, and figuring out where things went wrong becomes a geometric nightmare. Once they hit this stage, they're unable to really innovate and produce something good/new. On comes the 'acquisition' phase. When you cease to innovate, but require new product to generate new revenues, you simply start buying other companies.

Analog Devices is a recent example that comes to mind.

Much of the recent announcements from Autodesk are in line with the above article, and fit the behavior of that kind of death-spiral. They can rely on LabSpokane to keep them going. The corpse is already starting to stink; I'll be going.
 

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Re: The Autodesk Eagle edition
« Reply #273 on: January 25, 2017, 09:40:53 pm »
Since I'm not a user of any other Autodesk products, I took a look at the companies history (apart from Autocad). This is a real eye opener: http://www.stefandidak.com/2014/03/autodesk-the-metastasizing-cancer-of-the-3d-world/

AutoCAD likes this business model.  They did the same thing in the 2D world.  They were in a competitive world for 2D CAD on PCs.  Didn't have much of a toehold in the corporate world where much larger and more expensive packages ruled.  They beat the small house/personal CAD competition by buying them.  Strung users of competing products along for a couple years and then dropping the product.

The ECAD world is somewhat different since they are not already a player.  But I would guess that any user of a smaller ECAD product can expect to see their product bought by AutoCAD over the next few years and then discarded.  Looks like Ki CAD, the big guys or fall in love with AutoCAD are the choices.
 

Offline DimitriP

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Re: The Autodesk Eagle edition
« Reply #274 on: January 25, 2017, 10:28:59 pm »
Quote
In the US, I was forced to create an account to submit homework online

Yeah, well...this alone deserves it's own thread.

It is disgusting, wrong, innapropriate, but hey "everyone is doing it, so it must be ok".


   If three 100  Ohm resistors are connected in parallel, and in series with a 200 Ohm resistor, how many resistors do you have? 
 


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