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Raspberry Pi filesystem reliability with writes? And using an RPI for hosting?

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DiTBho:

--- Quote from: cdev on February 17, 2022, 02:00:41 pm ---Jeff Geerling seeems to have done a lot to answer my question here:
Now I need to get a Pi4 to be able to use PCIe

--- End quote ---

That guy is there to make videos and makes money with that, and it's no surprise that most of what he says is bullshit. Like when he suggested buying a 1600 Euro PCIe controller and several HDs just to make a NAS-toy; or 1200 euro just to make a cluster-toy.

Edit:
Of course, it's just my opinion.

Berni:

--- Quote from: cdev on February 17, 2022, 02:00:41 pm ---Jeff Geerling seeems to have done a lot to answer my question here:

Now I need to get a Pi4 to be able to use PCIe

:)

--- End quote ---

In that case be prepared for a whole lot of Linux wizardry to get something like that working. You don't get drivers included for a lot of this stuff and adding one in is not 'just installing it'. If you are in it for the fun of messing with linux and have recompiled the kernel before sure go for it. If you just want a working server you will be cursing it.

All this linux setup malarkey is the reason while i just shelled out the money for a Unraid license for my PC based NAS server. Pretty much all of the functionality could be put together by loading up a linux install with the appropriate open source software and configuring it all to work together. It became clear that is more work than i am willing to put up. My time is more valuable than that. Especially for someone like me who knows enough about linux to be dangerous, but is far far from a linux expert that uses it daily, so sometimes even a seemingly simple task might be a frustrating evening to sort out.

After all a stack of brand new quality reliable hard drives easily costs half a grand, so it does not make sense to shave dollars off the whole project in exchange for punting many extra hours of work into it while ending up with a worse performing less reliable system.

Nominal Animal:

--- Quote from: cdev on February 16, 2022, 10:05:07 pm ---I have been wondering what the best Raspberry Pi filesystem (Ext4 has been very reliable for me - although I have heard many good things about XFS.. but on the RPI, I dont know much about their pros and cons..)
--- End quote ---
It does not matter.  ext4, xfs, and even btrfs are all more reliable than the RPI hardware.

You see, the Broadcom SOC has a serious hardware issue: in certain situations, it can drop USB packets without telling anyone.  The Foundation has done a lot of work (by junior developers, as the senior developers do not associate with open source projects) to deal with this in software, but you cannot fix a silent hardware issue in software, not completely.

You'd be better off using an Amlogic S805 or S905 based SBC on Debian ARM port, as these have upstream Linux kernel support (including Amlogic employees contributing the support directly to the Linux kernel, instead of their own vendor kernels), and you can actually participate in the wider free/open source communities, instead of working inside the RPI community only.  Assuming reliability is a real concern, that is.  For a NAS box, minimize the Debian installation first, then only install what you need, and you get a pretty stable box.  For better stability, you'd need to switch to Devuan (Dev1) ARM port.

Me, I use xfs on large servers only; btrfs on Flash media and also when I want the features but don't want to use ext4 on top of LVM2 to get e.g. filesystem snapshot support (for coherent backups from running systems); and ext4 everywhere else.  On desktops, I use ext4 on top of LVM2 (since LVM2 provides most of the features people need xfs or btrfs for), but usually just ext4 on SBCs.

(Before anyone labels me an "anti-RPI nutjob", I do have a couple of RPIs myself, and half a dozen Amlogic S805/S905 variants, all of different types, from at least three different manufacturers [HardKernel, Orange Pi/Shenzhen Xunlong, Libre Computer, plus a TV box for hacking from H96].  However, I do have lots of Linux experience from all of its parts, including systems integration and distro development, so what I find useful might be different to what you need, so our experiences may well differ.)

DiTBho:

--- Quote from: Nominal Animal on February 18, 2022, 06:25:00 pm ---You see, the Broadcom SOC has a serious hardware issue: in certain situations, it can drop USB packets without telling anyone. 

--- End quote ---

I remember a YouTube influencer saying so wonderful things about Allwinner's H5* that I decided to buy some H3 and H5 SoCs which *apparently work* but as soon as you look under the hood you find they actually have a buggy co-processor MPU and a buggy thermal management as well as wrong DRAM setting values in u-boot, an you need to disable all of them and hack both kernel and firmware stuff.

cdev:
So for industrial settings, maybe not so good because they are prone to glichiness?

I recently got a (used) HP thin client for $20 that has a quad core AMD processor and radeon graphics.. Its small too. Thinking as using them as my super small go tobox..  The thing thats been putting me off the RPIS is the micro SD cards fail on me. Ive used flash drives on the thin client too, though I suspect that may happen to them too. It seems that I can probably put an SATA drive in them, with some difficulty and not a lot of cost. They have internal USB ports too, so can be closed up so the flash drive doesnt go anywhere. Seems like they draw around 2 or 3 amps. Just a bit more than an RPI. They come with gigabit Ethernet and are x86_64 compatible. They have a AMD processor with built in Radeon GFX  from a couple of years ago. Its not a speed demon but also its not that shabby, especially considering the price. Its a "real GPU" it shares graphics memory with the CPU, like the RPI.


--- Quote from: Nominal Animal on February 18, 2022, 06:25:00 pm ---
--- Quote from: cdev on February 16, 2022, 10:05:07 pm ---I have been wondering what the best Raspberry Pi filesystem (Ext4 has been very reliable for me - although I have heard many good things about XFS.. but on the RPI, I dont know much about their pros and cons..)
--- End quote ---
It does not matter.  ext4, xfs, and even btrfs are all more reliable than the RPI hardware.

You see, the Broadcom SOC has a serious hardware issue: in certain situations, it can drop USB packets without telling anyone.  The Foundation has done a lot of work (by junior developers, as the senior developers do not associate with open source projects) to deal with this in software, but you cannot fix a silent hardware issue in software, not completely.

You'd be better off using an Amlogic S805 or S905 based SBC on Debian ARM port, as these have upstream Linux kernel support (including Amlogic employees contributing the support directly to the Linux kernel, instead of their own vendor kernels), and you can actually participate in the wider free/open source communities, instead of working inside the RPI community only.  Assuming reliability is a real concern, that is.  For a NAS box, minimize the Debian installation first, then only install what you need, and you get a pretty stable box.  For better stability, you'd need to switch to Devuan (Dev1) ARM port.  Thanks for that into. Devuan is more solid than Debian? Debian has lots of stuff that gets installed with Gnome that I dont want, thats for sure.

Me, I use xfs on large servers only; btrfs on Flash media and also when I want the features but don't want to use ext4 on top of LVM2 to get e.g. filesystem snapshot support (for coherent backups from running systems); and ext4 everywhere else.  On desktops, I use ext4 on top of LVM2 (since LVM2 provides most of the features people need xfs or btrfs for), but usually just ext4 on SBCs.

(Before anyone labels me an "anti-RPI nutjob", I do have a couple of RPIs myself, and half a dozen Amlogic S805/S905 variants, all of different types, from at least three different manufacturers [HardKernel, Orange Pi/Shenzhen Xunlong, Libre Computer, plus a TV box for hacking from H96].  However, I do have lots of Linux experience from all of its parts, including systems integration and distro development, so what I find useful might be different to what you need, so our experiences may well differ.)

--- End quote ---

Thank you!

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