Author Topic: clock recommendation for Xilinx XCR3064XL (3.3v) or Altera Max 7000s (5v) CPLD  (Read 3785 times)

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Offline grips03

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Looking for a clock recommendation for Xilinx XCR3064XL (3.3v) or Altera Max 7000s (5v) CPLD

Clock will be 60hz. Would be cool if time high is same as time low. For some reason 555 timer does not like doing that.

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Offline JoeN

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Provide a clock of any value divisible by 60 and divide it down within the CPLD.  12.000 Mhz crystal / 60 = divide by 200,000.   Assumes you have the resources available.  It will give you a very accurate clock, as accurate as the crystal.

Something like this for 5V:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Valpey-Crystal-Oscillator-24MHz-5V-VF70BHT24-000MHz-DIP-8-Qty-4-/400272426272
http://www.ebay.com/itm/FOX-F1100E-120-Crystal-Oscillator-12MHz-5V-TTL-DIP-14-Qty-4-/301139016306

3.3V, search it out.

Why do you need such a slow clock?
« Last Edit: March 30, 2014, 07:09:40 am by JoeN »
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Offline dannyf

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Why do you need such a slow clock?

To build the world's slowest computer?

a 32Khz crystal + divider will work. Or a simple mcu.
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Offline grips03

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Provide a clock of any value divisible by 60 and divide it down within the CPLD.  12.000 Mhz crystal / 60 = divide by 200,000.   Assumes you have the resources available.  It will give you a very accurate clock, as accurate as the crystal.

Something like this for 5V:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Valpey-Crystal-Oscillator-24MHz-5V-VF70BHT24-000MHz-DIP-8-Qty-4-/400272426272
http://www.ebay.com/itm/FOX-F1100E-120-Crystal-Oscillator-12MHz-5V-TTL-DIP-14-Qty-4-/301139016306


Its for a Sega Genesis controller to Intellivision console adapter. I built an arcade controller to Intellivision console last year. So in this project I need the to clock the Sega Genesis controller, like the Genesis console does and decode 4 lines. I think I have the decoding logic right. And now need to find a way to clock this thing like the Sega Genesis console did.


3.3V, search it out.

Why do you need such a slow clock?
 

Offline SeanB

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You can make a 555 give a 120Hz output then divide by 2 in a 4013 chip to give 60HZ with equal on and off times quite easily. Otherwise a 4060 and use a RC oscillator to make some higher frequency and use the divider to get 60Hz.
 

Offline grips03

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Your right 555 timer will work after all.

I looked at the scope and pin 7 for the most part its 40 microseconds low, then 50 milliseconds high and then repeats. Its software controlled on the Genesis, so sometimes it high longer than this. For my purposes it should work ok.

r1=72k
r2=60ohm
c=1uf
 

Offline JoeN

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Why do you need such a slow clock?

To build the world's slowest computer?

a 32Khz crystal + divider will work. Or a simple mcu.

What simple divider solution could be used?  60 is not evenly divisible into 32768.
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Offline codeboy2k

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What simple divider solution could be used?  60 is not evenly divisible into 32768.

Not simple, but possible in hardware

32768 divide by 256 = 128 which is 8 more than you need for 120Hz. So drop 8 of every 128 pulses, or 128/8=16 so every 16th pulse of the 128Hz is gated out (dropped/swallowed).  This gives 120Hz. 

Then divide the final output by 2 to get a 50% duty cycle at 60Hz.   But this needs too much hardware... several counters and gates. 

It's really way, way easier with a small micro running an internal counter and dropping the needed counts.
 

Offline JoeN

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What simple divider solution could be used?  60 is not evenly divisible into 32768.

Not simple, but possible in hardware

32768 divide by 256 = 128 which is 8 more than you need for 120Hz. So drop 8 of every 128 pulses, or 128/8=16 so every 16th pulse of the 128Hz is gated out (dropped/swallowed).  This gives 120Hz. 

Then divide the final output by 2 to get a 50% duty cycle at 60Hz.   But this needs too much hardware... several counters and gates. 

It's really way, way easier with a small micro running an internal counter and dropping the needed counts.

Once I needed a divide by ten million counter and I found this project, he's doing exactly what you are saying with this micro.  Obviously you could provide a 12Mhz clock externally based on a crystal and divide by 200k.  It would just require a small code change:

http://www.leapsecond.com/pic/picdiv.htm
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