Author Topic: A week using an Apple iPhone -- An Android user's perspective  (Read 15610 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Online HalcyonTopic starter

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 5591
  • Country: au
I'm actually only 12 hours in, but I figured I'd start the thread now. I'm sure there will be more to come...

A bit of background: For some reason, my Samsung Galaxy S8 developed a fault where it would no longer communicate with any cellular networks. It started off as intermittent but now, it seems permanent. After some troubleshooting, I determined that it's a hardware fault. Luckily it's still under warranty so it's getting repaired/replaced for free. Until that happens, I needed a temporary phone. I have a bucket full of old Android's which would give me basic functionality like phone calls and SMS, but I thought I'd use this opportunity to live life with my first Apple product (aside from my vintage Apple collection) and see what all the hype was about. I'll try and approach this with an open mind and leave any biases aside.

So I got myself an iPhone which was a mate's previous model. Prior to me taking possession, it was completely unlinked from his iCloud account and factory reset. It was already running iOS 12, but a few versions behind.

I popped my SIM card in and started the set up process. To start with, I was forced to create a new Apple ID (and iCloud email address) since I wasn't prepared to link any of my actual credentials to this handset. It was a minor annoyance to be backed into this corner, but one I expected being an Apple product. Then a screen full of "mandatory" details that must be filled out, including full name, address, phone number, date of birth... WHY!? No option to skip, no other option but forward. So naturally I fabricated everything.

Then came a bunch of other set up procedures for various services that I was never going to use. I must have hit "skip" or "no thanks" about 8 to 10 times before I could finally use the device in any sort of meaningful way.

After about an hour, I received a FaceTime call from someone I didn't know, but before I could answer or reject the call, it was apparently "Answered from another device". What the?! Every settings screen I can see shows only one account (mine) linked to this handset. It was time to turn off this FaceTime garbage... I then spent the next 20-30 minutes scouring every corner of various settings menus, turning off options which ranged from location settings to backing up absolutely everything, automatically to Apple's servers. Some of these settings were in logical places, many were not.

For the most part, I find the user interface to be sluggish while attempting to seem fluid. It spends most of its time jiggling icons, displaying window transitions and fading things in and out with just about every interaction rather than just getting the job done. The text input is also more hit-and-miss compared to most other on-screen keyboards I've used (it almost feels like it's in need of a LCD re-calibration).

Then there were the endless messages about a software update. Just about every time I left the notifications section or some other settings screen, a message would pop up reminding me to update. A little annoying, but fine, I'll accept it. Instead of just downloading the update and applying it like every other device on the market, it refused to do anything until I connected it to a Wi-Fi network, there was no option to bypass or force the download using the cellular network (even though it's faster and I have unlimited data on my phone plan).

I installed three applications which I also need day-to-day: Signal, WhatsApp and Authy. By no means small or poorly designed applications. On more than one occasion, buttons would simply stop responding inside the applications and I was forced to kill the application before re-starting it. When I say "not responding", the device registered a tap (you could see it graphically activating the various buttons), but it just did nothing.

I admit, iOS 12.3.1 looks polished enough (albeit a little dated) but functionally, it's average at best.

I can already see this week is going to be a barrel of laughs...
 
The following users thanked this post: Muttley Snickers, Ysjoelfir

Offline bd139

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 23011
  • Country: gb
Re: A week using an Apple iPhone -- An Android user's perspective
« Reply #1 on: July 01, 2019, 10:56:46 am »
This sounds like you're in the "who moved my cheese" stage of ownership. Give it a few weeks.

Some comments:

1. You fucked up when you created a new icloud address and didn't want to sign in with your existing email address. I don't get why people do this. The whole damn smartphone ecosystem is based around cloud connectivity and communication whichever vendor you go to. If you fight it you're just punching yourself in the dick over and over again. Buy a Nokia brick. Don't use a smartphone.
2. At least they ask you about the services rather than Androids provisioning which is basically "hello, we own you".
3. Facetime. Never used it other than when I accidentally facetime'd someone. Can't comment. Meh
4. You seriously disabled all the cloud stuff?!? See point 1.
5. Sluggish? Transitions? What handset was this. Mine is an XR and is fluid as anything. Same with my old 6s on iOS 12. And lets not go down the Android sluggish route. In the middle of an "app update session" even a flagship Android lump barely works.
6. Keyboard. No problems with mine. Again, which handset and where did you get it? If it's a hooky one it might have a third party screen on it. At which point, your funeral.
7. You can't whine about updates when comparing to Android which basically punches you in the balls right in the middle of critical stuff with updates.
8. Pardon the update for not wanting to do it over your expensive data. It does actually do that if you want it to. Hit the settings app.

This is entirely the opposite experience I have. I was an android user from day one until 2017. Then I dumped it and got a 6s because I was fed up of being fucked over with Android shooting itself, SD card problems, apps not working, hangs, terrible performance, camera giving up randomly, battery problems, overheating. And that was on a Google flagship handset with vanilla android. It was hell.

Edit: to give you an idea how bad android was, I was in the middle of a contract job at one point with a whole damn site down trying to coordinate two companies and several engineers by phone. The dialler app updated right in the middle and then proceeded to not work at all. The handset bricked itself there and then as a phone. Totally useless. I actually went to the Apple Store 100 yards away and bought a 6s then because it was the only place I could just get a handset that would work, wasn't locked to some vendor or didn't have to jump through contract hoops to get my hands on it. Took 15 minutes to buy an set up and it stuck. It never let me down once. I never used Android again.
« Last Edit: July 01, 2019, 11:03:08 am by bd139 »
 
The following users thanked this post: ivan747

Online HalcyonTopic starter

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 5591
  • Country: au
Re: A week using an Apple iPhone -- An Android user's perspective
« Reply #2 on: July 01, 2019, 11:59:10 am »
On the topic of cloud services, I don't want or need any of that. I use Google for Gmail, Calendar and Contacts only. Why on earth would I want to link all the Apple rubbish to my primary email address as it will only ever be temporary? I don't trust Apple any more than I trust Google. At least with Google, I can download an archive of all my data and see exactly what is being tracked. If I don't like it, I switch it off. Apple is getting better at this, but they have a long way to go. Their default position is to move everyone onto their eco-system and make it harder to move away.

All my data is backed up to my private NAS, simply plug in a USB cable into my Android handset, copy the files down, that's it. No syncing, special applications or accounts required. It's literally a mass storage device.

bd139, nothing against you personally, but your responses reflect what I generally hear from Apple users, in that "You're doing it wrong". That seems to be Apple's mentality as well. I'm actually just expecting the bare minimum out of a so-called smart phone and want the ability to make my own decisions, but by assuming what I want, it makes productivity worse (for me).
« Last Edit: July 01, 2019, 12:03:47 pm by Halcyon »
 

Offline Ampera

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 2578
  • Country: us
    • Ampera's Forums
Re: A week using an Apple iPhone -- An Android user's perspective
« Reply #3 on: July 01, 2019, 12:06:00 pm »
I'm a fond believer that GNU needs to be brought to mobile devices with better vigor, and for a truly useful (not GNOME 3) mobile interface to be developed so it can become a proper possibility for people to spin their own phone environment.

I don't think it's fair to say that if you don't want to engage with cloud services you shouldn't have a smartphone. To me a smartphone is a computer, and when I spend money on a computer I expect to be able to do whatever I like to it. This is the core reason why Apple fails for me, at least on their iOS devices. It's fine if you want a nice shiny appliance that "just works", but that's never been my style (I run arch :) ). There should be room in the market for there to be a fully configurable mobile pocketable device that locks down nothing, just like a PC. It's obviously not for everyone, but there's got to be enough geeks in the world who would love to spend time on something like that.

I don't /love/ Android. To me, it's poorly documented under the hood, it's bloated and sluggish, it replaced too many things that were done better in GNU implementations. This is totally /my opinion/, but I don't blame Halcyon one bit for being a bit peeved at being taken out of his element, after all the most important thing about your environment is that it's /your/ environment and that you're comfortable and half-way happy with its quirks.

Even with ecosystem stuff, I get it, you want to have all your stuff in one place, I am still fairly google-centric, and though I am trying to move away from that to my own services that I run the way I like them, it's a lot of work, and people still have things they need to be done. That doesn't mean it's all fine to start getting upset that someone else is /not/ using a specific cloud service, even when using a device "built" around it. I know, I was like that, it's literally a way I tried to justify my own decisions because I needed affirmation that what I was doing was actually cool, with no care about what actually worked for other people, or even what worked for me. I'd wager you're happy to have chance at a new Team Apple member, and kinda want to reel people in, even I still get like that.

Anyways Halcyon, I had an iPhone 3G I messed around with, jailbreak was fun, I threw whited00r onto it, got some neat things to do, there's definitely tinkery fun to be had if that's what you're in for, and there are other people who like the hardware, don't like the Apple, even though you're probably gonna pick up your old phone just back again, it might be fun to tinker around with it for shits and giggles. Might learn something, and any skill is good to have.
I forget who I am sometimes, but then I remember that it's probably not worth remembering.
EEVBlog IRC Admin - Join us on irc.austnet.org #eevblog
 

Offline bd139

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 23011
  • Country: gb
Re: A week using an Apple iPhone -- An Android user's perspective
« Reply #4 on: July 01, 2019, 12:18:53 pm »
You don't need to use the cloud services if you dont want to but you do need to sign into the device and provide information. The reason behind this is that the two-factor authentication is fully integrated with the device and you can brick it remotely and the store is tightly controlled. No side loading. That's a massively powerful feature for protecting your data and the fully sandbox means there are very few device vulnerabilities out there in the wild. It's fine moving away from their services. I don't use their services either. I use Fastmail for email/calendars, OneNote for notes, Google maps. I don't use an icloud email address. At no points was I wholly tied into the ecosystem (been there, done that, will never do it again).   Ironically Apple are way way way ahead on the privacy game and the control of your data. It's their main selling point: https://www.apple.com/uk/privacy/

With respect to backup, that doesn't back up the data in your silo'ed apps like Google's cloud based ones. Their "Google Takeout" is pretty good. But then again if you read the terms and conditions and compare to Apple (I have as part of corporate responsibility and compliance studies) are pretty much awful.

The killer thing for me is total continuity. If I knacker my handset, I walk into an Apple store, buy another one, sign in and wait ten minutes and I'm back in business. That's requred for my line of work.

Understand what you're suggesting about Apple users in general but I will speak up if something is a turd. If you've heard my rantings about the MacBook Air keyboard and that I now use a crappy old thinkpad you'll find I'm pretty unbiased. If iOS ball-kicking edition comes out, I'll be the first person out there whinging about it.

The problem comes is that I was an Android user for literally years to the point of being an Android developer for a bit. iOS stays out of the way, doesn't demand my attention, doesn't get abandoned by the vendor after 6 months and has actually improved my sanity and productivity.

In the scale of what's possible they are both turds though. Apple just a lot less. We can do better but the market is a two party one so you have to take a side or walk away and I'm not throwing the social and business advantage away of walking away and can't afford the friction of Android.

I'm a fond believer that GNU needs to be brought to mobile devices with better vigor, and for a truly useful (not GNOME 3) mobile interface to be developed so it can become a proper possibility for people to spin their own phone environment.

I would slash my wrists in a moment if I had to use a phone from the free software side of things. I'm saying that as a Linux admin, RHCA with over 20 years of experience with Linux and a decade of commercial Unix before that. They can't even get a useable desktop OS out without fucking it up on a galactic scale.
 
The following users thanked this post: ivan747

Online HalcyonTopic starter

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 5591
  • Country: au
Re: A week using an Apple iPhone -- An Android user's perspective
« Reply #5 on: July 01, 2019, 12:19:06 pm »
Thanks Ampera, I would rather not jailbreak my friend's phone. Maybe one day I'll experiment with one.

For this week I will use the iPhone not because I have to, but because I genuinely want to see how different it is and how it would effect *my* workflow. So far, I miss the lack of customisation, but as this is only a temporary handset, I've just got the bare minimum installed.
« Last Edit: July 01, 2019, 12:27:01 pm by Halcyon »
 

Offline bd139

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 23011
  • Country: gb
Re: A week using an Apple iPhone -- An Android user's perspective
« Reply #6 on: July 01, 2019, 12:21:48 pm »
One tip: It did hurt me quite hard to move from Android to iOS. Try and find the iOS way of doing stuff. Go in open minded. I failed at all of those.
 

Online HalcyonTopic starter

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 5591
  • Country: au
Re: A week using an Apple iPhone -- An Android user's perspective
« Reply #7 on: July 01, 2019, 12:29:23 pm »
Thanks for being candid bd139. As I said, I'll give this a red hot go. Unfortunately because of my work the following are bare minimum requirements for me (which restrict me to a small number of handsets, Apple is one of them):

- Telstra "Blue Tick" approved (they are basically phones with higher gain antennas which have better coverage in fringe areas. Most phones never get this mark in Australia)
- Full disk and/or per-file encryption (with a chipset which hasn't been exploited by certain companies, no details mentioned)
- Decent battery life
- USB mass storage capability
- Support for 3G/LTE bands 1, 3, 5, 7, 8 and 28 (soon I'll be adding 5G bands to this list)

At the moment, the Samsung flagship models tick all those boxes (although I hate all the pre-loaded garbage; Bixby is the most useless feature ever).

If either Nokia or Blackberry still rolled their own hardware and included these features, I'd be very interested, but these days they are just names on cheap Chinese products.
 
The following users thanked this post: ivan747

Offline Ampera

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 2578
  • Country: us
    • Ampera's Forums
Re: A week using an Apple iPhone -- An Android user's perspective
« Reply #8 on: July 01, 2019, 12:37:39 pm »
I would slash my wrists in a moment if I had to use a phone from the free software side of things. I'm saying that as a Linux admin, RHCA with over 20 years of experience with Linux and a decade of commercial Unix before that. They can't even get a useable desktop OS out without fucking it up on a galactic scale.

You see, this is my core point. I have only been using Linux in a serious capacity for 1-2 years, and that's a /high/ end estimation. I started using it as a spur of the moment thing for desktop usage, and I think that it has truly redefined how I perform my computing. I believe Linux is an incredibly usable desktop OS if you like it, and want to put the time into making it usable, which I do. There's no such thing as one perfect environment, and there /shouldn't/ be. What's so great about computers is that they are infinitely programmable, and there's always a way to have another option, even if it's not easy.

I think the key fallacy is the, "try it my way, you'll like it my way" approach of suggesting tech. If there is a true benefit that you are suggesting to someone, you probably shouldn't have to tell them that they have to do it your way. People aren't you, they don't do things your way, and probably never will. Halcyon's not a complete beginner here, and throwing up everything he's ever known because /you/ say he should just isn't great.

My experience with this is how much I loved Arch Linux. It was a revelation of biblical proportions, and I wanted to share that with as many people as possible (in a genuinely religious way). Arch Linux only too, no filthy Ucuntu or Debian annoying. Arch Linux is a barebones distro, and requires a lot of under the hood knowing what you're doing to create an environment you can prosper from, and I'm a sort of person who very much enjoys that, and thought that just because it was easy, or even just fun and beneficial for me that if people just /tried/ to get into it, they'd find the same thing.

Well, I found that every single person I tried to convert just didn't have that sort of stamina. I struggled to try to teach people enough to get them hooked, since they really weren't interested and were just humoring me. I still suggest Arch Linux to people who want to get into Linux, because it worked with me, and it's what I know, but I now say don't expect a miracle, and that you have to learn and put time and effort into get out what you put in. It shouldn't annoy me that people are trying to Linux wrong, or computer wrong, since it's not me, and while I'm always here to help people with their problems in the way I know how, but not as a means to convert.

Thanks Ampera, I would rather not jailbreak my friend's phone. Maybe one day I'll experiment with one.

Didn't know if he gave it to you full and proper or as a loaner. Of course don't jailbreak his device, get a pennies cheap iPhone 3G or something to mess around with if you want to. Even if it's 30 bucks for a few hours of fun, it's still cheaper than laser tag.


P.S. Yes I understand the sort of hypocrisy I'm displaying by trying to explain to you how to not fanboy, because I discovered to not fanboy is the right way to do things, and that you need to do things my way. At the end of the day, conduct yourself how you wish, I still love engaging on the occasional throwdown defending my home team solution, it's nothing but human nature.
I forget who I am sometimes, but then I remember that it's probably not worth remembering.
EEVBlog IRC Admin - Join us on irc.austnet.org #eevblog
 

Online HalcyonTopic starter

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 5591
  • Country: au
Re: A week using an Apple iPhone -- An Android user's perspective
« Reply #9 on: July 01, 2019, 12:51:18 pm »
Halcyon's not a complete beginner here, and throwing up everything he's ever known because /you/ say he should just isn't great.

I did that about a year ago when I switched entirely from Windows to Linux. I don't regret a second of it. Windows 10 makes me angry and this is coming from someone who knows MS-DOS and Windows inside out since the beginning.
 

Offline bd139

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 23011
  • Country: gb
Re: A week using an Apple iPhone -- An Android user's perspective
« Reply #10 on: July 01, 2019, 12:53:38 pm »
Thanks for being candid bd139. As I said, I'll give this a red hot go. Unfortunately because of my work the following are bare minimum requirements for me (which restrict me to a small number of handsets, Apple is one of them):

- Telstra "Blue Tick" approved (they are basically phones with higher gain antennas which have better coverage in fringe areas. Most phones never get this mark in Australia)
- Full disk and/or per-file encryption (with a chipset which hasn't been exploited by certain companies, no details mentioned)
- Decent battery life
- USB mass storage capability
- Support for 3G/LTE bands 1, 3, 5, 7, 8 and 28 (soon I'll be adding 5G bands to this list)

At the moment, the Samsung flagship models tick all those boxes (although I hate all the pre-loaded garbage; Bixby is the most useless feature ever).

If either Nokia or Blackberry still rolled their own hardware and included these features, I'd be very interested, but these days they are just names on cheap Chinese products.


Yeah I'd stay away from anything that is Chinese generic handset derived with some customisation. Very low quality stuff usually. My eldest had a Nokia 5 for a bit as an example because I was being a cheap ass. Not very durable, had some serious battery life problems and bricked itself after 6 months resulting in a trip to a "third party approved repairer" under warranty who said it was water damaged and it wasn't and held it ransom for a charge to repair. I had to hit moneyclaim (UK courts service) to get them to pay out. That's another win for Apple - the service is much much better. She has my old 6s now. I took that back after 18 months of ownership to get a minor screen defect resolved and they couldn't fix it there and then in under an hour so gave me a brand new 6s handset immediately no questions asked.

Samsung I don't like. If it's Android it has to be stock.

On battery life, one of the killer features of my XR is the ability to squeeze two days out of it. I don't get charger anxiety. With my Thinkpad dual battery set up I can do a whole 12 hour day easy without dragging chargers around.

I would slash my wrists in a moment if I had to use a phone from the free software side of things. I'm saying that as a Linux admin, RHCA with over 20 years of experience with Linux and a decade of commercial Unix before that. They can't even get a useable desktop OS out without fucking it up on a galactic scale.

You see, this is my core point. I have only been using Linux in a serious capacity for 1-2 years, and that's a /high/ end estimation. I started using it as a spur of the moment thing for desktop usage, and I think that it has truly redefined how I perform my computing. I believe Linux is an incredibly usable desktop OS if you like it, and want to put the time into making it usable, which I do. There's no such thing as one perfect environment, and there /shouldn't/ be. What's so great about computers is that they are infinitely programmable, and there's always a way to have another option, even if it's not easy.

I think the key fallacy is the, "try it my way, you'll like it my way" approach of suggesting tech. If there is a true benefit that you are suggesting to someone, you probably shouldn't have to tell them that they have to do it your way. People aren't you, they don't do things your way, and probably never will. Halcyon's not a complete beginner here, and throwing up everything he's ever known because /you/ say he should just isn't great.

My experience with this is how much I loved Arch Linux. It was a revelation of biblical proportions, and I wanted to share that with as many people as possible (in a genuinely religious way). Arch Linux only too, no filthy Ucuntu or Debian annoying. Arch Linux is a barebones distro, and requires a lot of under the hood knowing what you're doing to create an environment you can prosper from, and I'm a sort of person who very much enjoys that, and thought that just because it was easy, or even just fun and beneficial for me that if people just /tried/ to get into it, they'd find the same thing.

Well, I found that every single person I tried to convert just didn't have that sort of stamina. I struggled to try to teach people enough to get them hooked, since they really weren't interested and were just humoring me. I still suggest Arch Linux to people who want to get into Linux, because it worked with me, and it's what I know, but I now say don't expect a miracle, and that you have to learn and put time and effort into get out what you put in. It shouldn't annoy me that people are trying to Linux wrong, or computer wrong, since it's not me, and while I'm always here to help people with their problems in the way I know how, but not as a means to convert.

When it comes to computation, I value leveraging it to solve problems rather than as an activity itself. I've grown out of the activity side of things. Many years ago I'd sit there on my cluster of old pentium 2 machines building kernels from scratch and running a mini network in my house. At one point I had a couple of big Sun enterprise machines. Then I got married, then I got kids, then my priorities changed. My objective is now to get from A-B efficiently and that means not fighting customisation where possible. Arch feels like that for me. So does Android. To get anything functional I have to climb a mountain and if anything goes wrong I have to climb that mountain again. Ergo even my current Linux activity goes through the portal of windows 10 and into CentOS on AWS where I can shortcut hundreds of little customisation concerns which all build up to the point it becomes a cost in both time and money and stress. This is the "principle of least surprise" in practice.

I'd rather have the soldering iron and morse key in my hand you see.

Halcyon's not a complete beginner here, and throwing up everything he's ever known because /you/ say he should just isn't great.

I did that about a year ago when I switched entirely from Windows to Linux. I don't regret a second of it. Windows 10 makes me angry and this is coming from someone who knows MS-DOS and Windows inside out since the beginning.

Windows 10 makes me angry too. But when your day job is wrangling hundreds of Linux machines it makes you less angry than Linux does :)

Perspective is an issue always.



I await the day I can retire and live in the sticks and shake my fist at technology :)
 

Offline Mr. Scram

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 9810
  • Country: 00
  • Display aficionado
Re: A week using an Apple iPhone -- An Android user's perspective
« Reply #11 on: July 01, 2019, 01:53:11 pm »
I got into exactly the same phone being held hostage pilo-o-poo with an official Apple repair centre. I wanted to believe they did better, but I guess they don't.
 

Offline bd139

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 23011
  • Country: gb
Re: A week using an Apple iPhone -- An Android user's perspective
« Reply #12 on: July 01, 2019, 02:02:18 pm »
Didn't you buy a hooky phone though if I remember?
 

Offline Mr. Scram

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 9810
  • Country: 00
  • Display aficionado
Re: A week using an Apple iPhone -- An Android user's perspective
« Reply #13 on: July 01, 2019, 02:39:24 pm »
Didn't you buy a hooky phone though if I remember?
No, but even ignoring that part of the story it all was hooky as hell. Asking to make an appointment to pick up the phone and then not having it there and that's just one of many stunts they pulled. I've wasted way too much time on their runaround scheme. Utter dicks.
 

Offline james_s

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 21611
  • Country: us
Re: A week using an Apple iPhone -- An Android user's perspective
« Reply #14 on: July 01, 2019, 04:16:25 pm »
For me it was not so much which mobile platform I like best but which I hate least. They're both crap honestly, they both piss me off. Overall my iPhone works very well, I've never used any of the cloud stuff, never used facetime. I've never been as happy with it as I was with iOS 6 though. That was so nice and polished, it felt high end and it just worked. iOS 7 took on a butt fugly look that the platform has never recovered from and I'm always hitting bugs. The reminders worked perfectly in 6 and I relied on them heavily. At some point they broke and have never been fixed, they're just flakey.

I have a few Android devices too and they have their own set of issues.
 

Offline Berni

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 4868
  • Country: si
Re: A week using an Apple iPhone -- An Android user's perspective
« Reply #15 on: July 02, 2019, 05:40:52 am »
Everyone around me has Android phones and i never really seen issues with reliability (The once case i seen at a relative turned out to be a half dying SD card) or forced updates (These phones even stop getting any updates at all after 2 years). And no nether Android or iPhone are perfect.

I have come to Android from using Windows Mobile 2002 to Windows Mobile 6.1, and i was also annoyed by quite a few things that Android does. And funny enough the things that irked me in that switch are also similar things that irk me on iOS compared to Android.

Windows Mobile was a pretty much no bullshit OS that didn't try to look pretty, nor try stop you from doing anything stupid. it was a big step in what phones could do, since we could finally run native machine code binaries rather than java. Things ran fast even on such old hardware and it worked well (Apart from needing a reboot every month or so but that's just windows for you).

Then Microsoft killed off Windows Mobile and created that Windows Phone 7 abomination that nobody wants, so i came to Android and okay it did look a bit prettier, but everything seamed slower despite the device its running on having way more processing power. So many things unnecessarily animated, so many settings locked down and hidden away. And wait... I need to download a frigi'n file manager to see my filesystem?! Okay fine USB it is... it appears as a digital camera?! And why is navigating trough it so slow?! Okay fine how do i install stuff... only trough the Play store? Can't i just copy a executable on there and run it? Okay fine... But i also want a new theme...A samsung account?! I have to f****g register just to install a new UI theme? And why are notifications poping up all the time for all these crappy apps. Okay lets just customize the apps menu then... you can only move things around? No folders even?! (We are talking early android here) You are saying i can't just make a shortcut to anything i want in the start menu like by just dropping a file in the start menu folder? And why are there basically no hardware buttons? Not even arrow keys for gods sake! Sigh... this thing is a toy made for IT illiterates.

Then using a iOS device sent me basically trough the same thing. It felt unnecessarily pretty and animated, but with an even more inconsistent UI and less actual buttons. The software features even more limited and locked down, it couldn't even multitask in any satisfying way in the early days (while Windows Mobile 2002 could many years before). I don't need the OS protecting me from myself, if i screw up a important system file its my fault that it doesn't boot anymore.

Its the same trend desktop OSes are taking lately. They are making them ever more locked down and idiot proof.

EDIT: And yes i'm still using Android. Its gotten better over the years or maybe i just gotten used to it. And id be fine with using an iPhone too. But i still think the Windows Mobile 6 experience was better.
« Last Edit: July 02, 2019, 05:46:35 am by Berni »
 
The following users thanked this post: Ysjoelfir

Offline Marco

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 6671
  • Country: nl
Re: A week using an Apple iPhone -- An Android user's perspective
« Reply #16 on: July 02, 2019, 06:23:29 am »
I've always felt that usability has been where the reality distortion field has done Apple the most favours.

If you're willing to pay for it great for security, privacy and hardware though. Not a bad deal at the high end, lower end their margins get a bit ridiculous though.

PS. their dominance and vertical integration is damaging for the tech industry though, far worse than Microsoft ever was.
« Last Edit: July 02, 2019, 06:26:25 am by Marco »
 

Online HalcyonTopic starter

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 5591
  • Country: au
Re: A week using an Apple iPhone -- An Android user's perspective
« Reply #17 on: July 03, 2019, 07:08:14 am »
Day 3

I confirmed that the LCD is a genuine Apple display which has never been replaced. I'll chop up the inaccuracies in the keyboard to muscle memory and a different sized handset I'm used to. However I have found that the colours seem rather more subdued or washed out when watching videos when compared to my Samsung. The Samsung LCD is not only a higher resolution, but colours seem to be reproduced more accurately.

The internal speaker in the iPhone is also significantly quieter (at full volume) and suffers from minor distortion (this could just be my picky ear from years in video production).

Other than that, it's been fine. I still miss the ability to fine-tune settings and really customise things. Overall, I would rate the iPhone as "adequate", it does every job just fine, but doesn't really excel in any particular area.


 

Offline bd139

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 23011
  • Country: gb
Re: A week using an Apple iPhone -- An Android user's perspective
« Reply #18 on: July 03, 2019, 07:10:12 am »
Which handset model is this out of interest?
 

Online HalcyonTopic starter

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 5591
  • Country: au
Re: A week using an Apple iPhone -- An Android user's perspective
« Reply #19 on: July 03, 2019, 07:19:54 am »
Which handset model is this out of interest?

iPhone SE running 12.3.1.
 

Offline bd139

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 23011
  • Country: gb
Re: A week using an Apple iPhone -- An Android user's perspective
« Reply #20 on: July 03, 2019, 07:32:26 am »
Ah SE is the Moto E of iPhones. Bear that in mind during evaluation. It’s not a bad handset as such but it’s based on 2015 tech in a 2010 chassis.
 

Offline Jeroen3

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 4038
  • Country: nl
  • Embedded Engineer
    • jeroen3.nl
Re: A week using an Apple iPhone -- An Android user's perspective
« Reply #21 on: July 03, 2019, 07:36:18 am »
The problem with none of the handsets fitting any of our requirements is because we are above average users.
To limit myself even attempting to tinker with my phone, I bought an iPhone. Tinker factor 0.

Day 3

I confirmed that the LCD is a genuine Apple display which has never been replaced. I'll chop up the inaccuracies in the keyboard to muscle memory and a different sized handset I'm used to.
Apple's on screen keyboard is a kind of special thing. They researched how users typed and adjusted where the keys triggered from where the keys are displayed.
Try typing upside down as a joke. It won't work properly at all.
This is because our digits are not cursors.

If you have those fancy Swipe keyboards they try the same. But typical on screen keyboard of random android do not, and it types differently.

Don't try jailbreaking anymore. You don't need it, and the community is collapsing. The package manager, Cydia, has been more or less abandoned. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cydia
Back in the day pre iPhone 3GS and iPhone 4, jailbreaking addedd lots of features. But now not so much anymore.

*owner of iPhone 8 256GB.
 

Offline Mechatrommer

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 11418
  • Country: my
  • reassessing directives...
Re: A week using an Apple iPhone -- An Android user's perspective
« Reply #22 on: July 03, 2019, 01:19:05 pm »
good luck on repairing those lcd... check 28:50


mr rossman has buttload of other apple rant video's such as...


i decided not to poke iphone with 10' barge pole when realizing it cannot bluetoothing with other android devices few years ago.
Nature: Evolution and the Illusion of Randomness (Stephen L. Talbott): Its now indisputable that... organisms “expertise” contextualizes its genome, and its nonsense to say that these powers are under the control of the genome being contextualized - Barbara McClintock
 

Offline bd139

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 23011
  • Country: gb
Re: A week using an Apple iPhone -- An Android user's perspective
« Reply #23 on: July 03, 2019, 01:45:45 pm »
Gah. Rossman is basically "technology Trump" and selling his own polarising viewpoint for youtube mindshare while preying on people stupid enough to spent $2000 on a device they can't afford to replace or repair to start with and don't have insurance to cover it. Apple aren't going to replace a device full of coffee and spooge. No one is. Claim it on your insurance!

Only thing I BT to is my car and that works nicely. Literally just get in it and it works. Don't have to do anything.
« Last Edit: July 03, 2019, 01:47:45 pm by bd139 »
 

Offline Mechatrommer

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 11418
  • Country: my
  • reassessing directives...
Re: A week using an Apple iPhone -- An Android user's perspective
« Reply #24 on: July 03, 2019, 01:54:05 pm »
i dont see any advantage for him bashing apple. most of his video showing repair on apple products. when no more people buying apple whats he's going to repair? i think people buying android will just buy another one new when their older one got a slight brokenage. its expendable, probably much cheaper and less hassle than sending to repair shop like rossman's? a premium grade iphone can probably buy 2 or 3 premium grade samsung, no?
« Last Edit: July 03, 2019, 02:03:46 pm by Mechatrommer »
Nature: Evolution and the Illusion of Randomness (Stephen L. Talbott): Its now indisputable that... organisms “expertise” contextualizes its genome, and its nonsense to say that these powers are under the control of the genome being contextualized - Barbara McClintock
 


Share me

Digg  Facebook  SlashDot  Delicious  Technorati  Twitter  Google  Yahoo
Smf