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Alternative to US Puget systems quiet workstation computers? available in Canada

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dentaku:
I used to build my own desktop machines but that was many years ago. My desktop is very old now and I don't feel like researching all the new motherboards, CPUs and ram so I want to simply buy one from a company that builds powerful and quiet workstations for non-gamers.
It's got to be quiet and give me very low latencies in audio applications when using my Focusrite 2i2 audio interface.
Of course having a fast CPU and lots of ram will also help in circuit simulation software, Fusion 360 and compiling microcontroller code / FPGA simulation.

Puget Systems builds such workstations but they only sell in the US.

Where would someone in Canada find a service like this?
I could just look at the parts list for a computer Puget sells as a guide and order them then assemble it myself but I would prefer to just buy the whole thing already assembled.
I'm sure I could build something like this for less money but I'm willing to pay for the convenience. I would probably start with just the onboard video and 16GB of ram if I built my own.
https://www.pugetsystems.com/nav/core/Z590-A/customize/

Wuerstchenhund:
Puget sells custom PCs. Most of the components they use is gamer-grade/consumer-grade hardware.

They seem to be one of the better assemblers out there, and they offer some powerful PCs, but you still get generic components and (as far as I can see) no ISV certifications so they aren't really a true 'workstation' vendor.

We buy lots of workstations, and we stick with HP and Dell because the hardware is rock solid (especially HP) and comes with certifications for a wide range of professional applications and OSes (which is mandatory for many software programs to even get support), support is very good and there are a lot of support options, and real prices are generally lower than what most assemblers can do anyways.

But at the end of the day it all depends on what you want/need. If you're fine with lower tier hardware or have special requirements that the big names can't satisfy then an assembler may be the best option.

thm_w:
Your requirements are relatively low. You'd want a GPU for fusion though, something basic like a 1660/3060, etc. with decent vram.
Places like memory express will build the system from parts you buy from them for a minimal fee. Or you can buy a prebuilt, which may end up cheaper given current shortages.

The nice thing about modern motherboards is they have much better fan control options in the BIOS. I'm not sure if Dell or HP have any of that stuff. Noise is mostly about the case, decent cpu air cooler, and what fan curves you choose.

This is the puget case: https://www.memoryexpress.com/Products/MX81090

nctnico:

--- Quote from: dentaku on November 22, 2021, 08:18:51 pm ---I used to build my own desktop machines but that was many years ago. My desktop is very old now and I don't feel like researching all the new motherboards, CPUs and ram so I want to simply buy one from a company that builds powerful and quiet workstations for non-gamers.
It's got to be quiet and give me very low latencies in audio applications when using my Focusrite 2i2 audio interface.
Of course having a fast CPU and lots of ram will also help in circuit simulation software, Fusion 360 and compiling microcontroller code / FPGA simulation.

Puget Systems builds such workstations but they only sell in the US.

--- End quote ---
Buy one of the higher end workstations from Dell. These are really quiet. Probably quieter than can be build from standard components because the motherboard and casing are designed to form one unit for providing optimal airflow. I have a Dell Precision 5810 for several years already. I've upgraded it to a GPU with a passive cooling solution though. In the beginning I had to get used to the absense of noise coming from a PC in my office.

Simon:
You post reads like an add, I'd have treated it so were it not for your history of genuine posts. I've built my own PC's right from the start after buying my own first PC. I've never had issues with compatibilities, I have no idea what you are on about. There is a reason the PC parts industry is dominated by standards, else it just would not work at all. Sure if you buy some cheap junk of an addon card you may have issues but generally motherboard + CPU + ram + graphics card + decent PSU and you are done.

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