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AMD Announces Zen 2/Ryzen 3000 at Computex

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Ampera:
I'm sure everyone's seen it, but by golly do we need to get some new threads up in here!

AMD, at a, beautifully, orchestrated showcase in Taipei just last night (for me), announced their new Ryzen 3000 CPUs. They also announced their 64-core Rome EPYC CPUs, and Navi, their "new" GPU series, which by the numbers doesn't look so amazing to me, and nobody really cares about.

What does look amazing is their new lineup of Ryzen CPUs, including two 8 core 16 thread CPUs, one at 65W SIXTY FIVE WHATS, and another at 105, with 3.6 -> 4.4 and 3.9 -> 4.4 clocks respectively.

Even though that was pretty incredible, not as much as the Ryzen 9 3900X, which albeit not a 16 core CPU like many were expecting, is a 12 core 24 thread monster running at 3.8 -> 4.6 Ghz, at again a 105W TDP.

Other insanities include a reported 40 PCIe 4.0 lanes, with (there's some muddyness about the implementation, but potentially), 80 PCIe 3.0 lanes worth of throughput. There's also a couple of Ryzen 5 CPUs that were supposedly announced, but elsewhere, not in the showcase. Prices for the Ryzen 7 3700X, Ryzen 7 3800X, and Ryzen 9 3900X are 329, 399, and 499 USD respectively.

12 cores 24 threads for half a grand, and apparently it seriously hurts Intel's upper end. We don't have independent benches yet, but it's looking like an all around bad day for Intel, who is still on a, we hope status, for 10nm's dropping in 2020, if it ever drops at all.

Not all is great for AMD, however, particularly its motherboard partners, as these new insane CPUs are apparently going to have iffy support statuses on motherboards from companies like MSI, although not ASUS, who state that all boards from Zen 1 launch to now are going to be perfectly compatible (presumably with BIOS updates) with all Ryzen 3000 chips.

So what are the thoughts? Has AMD repeated 2003 by releasing tech that completely destroys Intel in capabilities, with apparently little recourse? People have also had concerns about AMD's stability, and while I own many many perfectly stable, beautifully running AMD machines, I also own 4 (yes 4) completely dead nForce 4 939 motherboards I had /bought/ to use in a project. Time might only tell.

Ice-Tea:

--- Quote from: Ampera on May 27, 2019, 05:52:36 pm ---Not all is great for AMD, however, particularly its motherboard partners, as these new insane CPUs are apparently going to have iffy support statuses on motherboards from companies like MSI, although not ASUS, who state that all boards from Zen 1 launch to now are going to be perfectly compatible (presumably with BIOS updates) with all Ryzen 3000 chips.

--- End quote ---

Probably not *perfectly* compatible, as PCIe 4.0 won't be available for "far away" slots. To be honnest, I'm not sure I think it is such as big deal. The high-end first gen AM4 board probably will get updates, the lower-tier maybe not which makes sense as the power delivery there has less headroom. But even if your high-end mobo doesn't allow the upgrade, you can probably buy a lower-tier new gen board that offers the same functionality as features trickle down...

And the notion that at least *some* board will allow upgrades rips a new one over at Team Blue.

Ice-Tea:
Also: it's kinda funny how there's a hole the size of Uranus in this plot (the 16c/32t part) that is essentially a booby trap waiting to be sprung. As soon as Team Blue gets something out the door that might, maybe, pose a threat AMD launches it watches Intel go down in flames.

They know it, we know it, everybody knows it and there's nothing anyone can do about it  ^-^

Also: still rocking a 4750K and have no intention of replacing it.

Ampera:
If you mean 4790k, that's like the DX2-66 of this generation, everyone has one.

Of course, this is the sort of stuff you have to start complaining about when you're at the top of the mountain, looking down at Intel who still thinks it's okay to disable hyperthreading on even their higher end chips. Intel would have just put a new software incompatible chipset on it, and a socket that just has one incompatible pin that "makes all the difference".

Still, I thought it was worth mentioning.

BravoV:
Still have my 1700 and feel content about it as I don't do heavy computing or running tons of VMs, and no gaming as well.  :P

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