Products > Computers

HDD S.M.A.R.T help

(1/1)

kaugustino:
[attach=1]
Hello
I have this HDD that is getting up in age. Just wondering how it is doing. i know smart data is not perfect.
System is win7

Rerouter:
Looks like no pending or realicated segments. So looks healthy to me. SMART data is usually a very good indicator of a drives health.

Its presented weirdly in that program. But what your looking for is the data column. Which is what the drive is reporting. Threshold is when it starts reporting a value. Which for reallocated sectors you can see it hides its health until 140 have been used up. This is why many rules of thumb about preparing to replace a drive when you see that count change

Smart data can also help catch things like crappy data cables when you see data crc errors start to spike.

kaugustino:
Thanks. That equals out to what my smart tests were saying. I just want to be sure. As i am going to build a new system soon anyway.

Nominal Animal:
What I do with spinning disks, is keep track of any changes in the raw value ("data") of SMART attributes 1, 5, 196, 198, 199.

I do not trust disks with any number of reallocated sectors (5, 196); to me, they are very similar to bad pixels on a display.
Sure, the disk may be otherwise good, but the data I keep on spinning disks is valuable enough for me to be picky.

The disks I've had fail, have either done so completely unexpectedly, or with an increase in (some of the) aforementioned attributes just before failure.
I also run smartd on machines with spinning disks; it is responsible for reading the disk sector by sector regularly, to ensure all data is still accessible.
I also run an offline SMART test to update all the attributes before checking them; this depends a bit on the drive firmware, though.
Whenever I haven't powered up the drives for a while (say, for a month or longer; I have offline simulation data I use for exploring visualization and sonification), I run a full SMART self-test, and recheck the attributes for any changes.

All this is classed "paranoid", but I do it with existing services and a couple of custom scripts, so it's not much of an effort, really.
It won't always catch a drive before they fail, and i may have discarded drives that still have life in them.
I do not use any Seagate drives, for example, because I've had too many of them fail.

kaugustino:
Great points. Thanks
I have had two or 3 Seagate drives go bad myself. With 1 WD (Blue?) that had issues. I tend to also listen to my dives too. As i figured out a drive was having issues before S.M.A.R.T noticed. I am a bit paranoid with this hdd being older. I might just ghost it just for my sanity sake.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

There was an error while thanking
Thanking...
Go to full version