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How many years to keep HDDs inside NAS before preventive replacement?

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Rerouter:
If your device supports it, setup an email or other critical notification if anything changes about any of the critical SMART data, I use hard disk sentinel for this,

A hard drive that is happily spinning away and not showing any issues via SMART is technically more trusted than a brand new untested drive, as a drive that has been running for years is less likely to face a critical fault if disturbed, vs a new drive that could have manufacturing faults

To this end, any new drive I will tend to run 3-5 verified erase passes with random data, So far it has caught all early faults,

If you wish to verify that your drives are fully healthy, make the device perform a full volume read test, while most enterpise like weekly, I prefer monthly at a low transfer rate. (Raid card handles this for me)

Other small thing is a lot of SSD's with many reallocated sectors, but low wear leveling can be fine to keep using, just need to force it to read over the drive a few times and prompt the controller to reallocate everything, you will usually loose some space on the drive, but after that bad area is dealt with, the rest is usually ok.

Haenk:

--- Quote from: Mr. Scram on January 25, 2020, 10:40:20 pm ---It's hard to get a hard drive up to those temperatures even in ill-advised scenarios due to convection and heat transfer through the supporting brackets. It wouldn't surprise me if you'd need insulation or have some hot part in close proximity.

--- End quote ---

A certain enclosure we sold (I'd guess about 10k of them) was essentially a closed metal frame inside a closed acrylic frame. 7200rpm drives ran really hot in there, easily reaching 60oC or more. However this hasn't led to a higher failure rate (compared to drives without enclosure), surprisingly.

Mr. Scram:

--- Quote from: Haenk on January 28, 2020, 02:48:56 pm ---A certain enclosure we sold (I'd guess about 10k of them) was essentially a closed metal frame inside a closed acrylic frame. 7200rpm drives ran really hot in there, easily reaching 60oC or more. However this hasn't led to a higher failure rate (compared to drives without enclosure), surprisingly.

--- End quote ---
A closed acrylic frame with zero convection is nigh on intentionally insulating the drive. That's probably a worst case scenario. Your experience seems to mirror what the big hard drive consumers report though. :)

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