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Linux for the rest of US, Ubuntu's (un)friendliness, dual boot win10 and 18,4lts

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alpher:
Just tried to install Ubuntu 18.4LTS alongside my windows 10 install, imagined it to be rather smooth an painless process :(, boy I was wrong.
I've installed and used a couple of versions both Ubuntu and it's light weigh cousin Lubuntu, both times it was a straightforward fresh install on a wiped hdd.
Now for a couple of reasons I wanted to have it installed alongside my windows 10 install.
What could be difficult here I thought?, convincing a windows user to switch to Linux has to be one of the most important (if not THE one!) priorities of the Ubuntu team, I'm I right here?
My reasoning: to bring people to the (dark  >:D) side one has to make it easy first to try the product then to convince future converts that the Linux is a better or at least not inferior choice.
After all it is free ::).
So in my naivety I fired up a freshly downloaded 18.4lts image from a USB stick hoping that given the above the installer will somehow automagicaly  allow me to create a new partition and install ubuntu there without much intervention, guess not. >:(
OK. I gather I have to resize my partitions beforehand, done.
I have a fresh empty partition ready to accept my new Ubuntu install, I'll fire up the installer, point to the empty space, hit install and voilla!! , :( you guessed.
Instead of accepting the destination, and doing all the "necessary" prep work all by itself, I'm being bombarded with options to create extra partitions, formating options that let you choose from like 20 different filesystems? :-//
How the f#uck I'm supposed to know what partitions to create, how many, and what's the mount point?
I know that there are guides on the net regarding this, but why, I mean WHY the geniuses at Ubuntu didn't think of doing it somehow easier for the first time potential convert?
Couldn't the installer somehow interactively guided you through the process? Is it to difficult a programming task in 2019?
Or is the secret goal of all the Ubuntu programmers to keep the Linux acceptance at below 1.5% mark?

Ampera:
I mean to be fair there isn't really a benchmark by how it /should/ be done. Partitioning and installing is a (relatively) complicated thing that can't just be automated. It's not like you can install Windows on a machine that has Linux on it and expect the Windows installer to figure out how the hell to dual boot it.

The thing about Linux, and the thing that so many people don't get (including Ubuntu) is that it's best when you consider it's a sophisticated piece of software you need to learn. While Windows might try to cater to a simpler audience, Linux and Windows are /different/ and do things in different ways with different steps and often to different ends.

What I don't get about people complaining when everything just doesn't work for them like they think it should in Linux is why they are drawn to Linux in the first place. You can't expect me to believe some marketing saying that it's magically easy to use is the sole reason why you want to use it. If Windows is working for you better than Linux, then that's great, and feel free to leave Linux and its universe be, there's no reason we can't eventually come to a two OS ecosystem (there have been many many before). If you're finding that Windows isn't doing what you want it to, and want something different, don't act upset and surprised when it is different.

I wanted a rude username:
The idea is to get people to switch to Linux, and the defaults are an easy way to do that. Accept defaults, and the installer razes your hard drive and does all the partitioning, filesystem selection, bootloader installation, etc. for you.

As soon as you want the installer to accept responsibility for not nuking existing data, the situation gets way harder. You could argue that hiding that behind an "Advanced" option is actually desirable.

alpher:

--- Quote from: HaywoodJablowme on September 30, 2019, 12:33:14 am ---The idea is to get people to switch to Linux, and the defaults are an easy way to do that. Accept defaults, and the installer razes your hard drive and does all the partitioning, filesystem selection, bootloader installation, etc. for you.

As soon as you want the installer to accept responsibility for not nuking existing data, the situation gets way harder. You could argue that hiding that behind an "Advanced" option is actually desirable.

--- End quote ---

Actually the installer defaults to a fresh install, Nuking all existing data into oblivion.
I find it quite unacceptable, letting you install and effectively use the os without nuking the existing data should be the highest priority, option to Nuke should be just that an OPTION, not the default.

ebclr:
Follow this instruction you will be surprised by how easy and useful this is 

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/wsl/install-win10

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