Author Topic: RS-232 - still alive and well  (Read 2317 times)

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Offline NiHaoMike

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RS-232 - still alive and well
« on: July 29, 2021, 01:59:10 pm »

Who else expected a young Chinese girl to not only know what it is but also why it's good to have?
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Offline DiTBho

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Re: RS-232 - still alive and well
« Reply #1 on: July 29, 2021, 02:38:38 pm »
Just looked at the title, yes, I have recently Japanese laptop and found the RS-232 is still alive and well, but that girl on Youtube ...
« Last Edit: July 29, 2021, 02:49:51 pm by DiTBho »
 

Offline T3sl4co1l

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Re: RS-232 - still alive and well
« Reply #2 on: July 29, 2021, 07:05:41 pm »
Well, I expected her to? :-//

She's been around for, let's see, 2015 at least, don't remember how many years before that?  Her appearance is unconventional, I suppose you might say, but she's got lots of electronics/programming/hacker/maker experience.

I haven't followed her career much, but she's definitely out there doing real projects. :-+

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Offline SiliconWizard

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Re: RS-232 - still alive and well
« Reply #3 on: July 29, 2021, 07:33:53 pm »
Yeah, she sure is showing a lot of boobs, but she's doing real stuff and has become pretty knowledgeable. So, hey, why not.

As to RS232, I haven't used that in over 15 years or so.
If I ever have to occasionally connect to a machine through RS232, I'll just buy a USB-RS232 adapter. But hey.
 

Offline Siwastaja

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Re: RS-232 - still alive and well
« Reply #4 on: July 29, 2021, 07:40:35 pm »
I use classic asynchronous serial (UART) a lot but not RS232 signalling unless I have to due to choices made by others. RS232 isn't that robust in the end, so either logic level for simplicity and least part count, or some differential solution like RS422/485 or CAN. The latter can be had at the same complexity (a transceiver chip) as RS232.
 

Offline DiTBho

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Re: RS-232 - still alive and well
« Reply #5 on: July 29, 2021, 07:58:45 pm »
My Japanese laptop also adds a Canbus @ 1Mbps port with a funny 4 pins connector.
My Japanese graphic calculator has a 3 wires serial-ling, which is actually a true LVTTL serial line @ 115200bps.

Will Canbus replace RS232? Who knows  :-//
 

Offline NiHaoMike

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Re: RS-232 - still alive and well
« Reply #6 on: July 30, 2021, 01:06:09 am »
She's been around for, let's see, 2015 at least, don't remember how many years before that?  Her appearance is unconventional, I suppose you might say, but she's got lots of electronics/programming/hacker/maker experience.
I expected her to know what it is, but not to have a device that used it. Most modern devices that have a serial port for configuration use a logic level UART connector or integrate a USB UART chip.
Will Canbus replace RS232? Who knows  :-//
Only if CAN interfaces become as common on microcontrollers as UARTs are now. I would say there's a better chance of USB OTG replacing UART, but UART has the simplicity that others don't.

Other potential alternatives would be I2C and SPI. I2C is a bit more complex with addressing while SPI is the fastest but also the highest pin count. What used to be an advantage over UART was no need for a precise clock, but many microcontrollers nowadays have internal oscillators good enough for UARTs.
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Offline Siwastaja

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Re: RS-232 - still alive and well
« Reply #7 on: July 30, 2021, 06:52:09 am »
Will Canbus replace RS232? Who knows  :-//

For general purpose maintenance/debug/low cost device port - no. CAN stays where it is useful, and those maintenance ports partially stay in RS232, partially transfer to logic level serial, and partially transfer to more complex alternatives such as Ethernet, bluetooth, other wireless, or custom ports.
 

Offline DiTBho

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Re: RS-232 - still alive and well
« Reply #8 on: July 30, 2021, 09:04:47 am »
Only if CAN interfaces become as common on microcontrollers as UARTs are now. I would say there's a better chance of USB OTG replacing UART, but UART has the simplicity that others don't.

There are a lot of Freescale MPUs that come with an embedded CAN, also there are a some good and cheap SPI-CAN chip. So, it seems possible.

Other potential alternatives would be I2C and SPI

Both my Japanese PDA and laptop come with I2c and SPI. The laptop also has CAN, "RS232-4W"(1), I2C and SPI; however, I2C and SPI are only used internally(2), there is a little connector under the plastic, you can somehow access it, but you cannot connect a cable longer than 20cm, and that's the point! CAN and RS232 can be used with long cables! Even longer than 1m.



(1) "RS232-4W" means { 3.3V, TX, RX, GND }, it's sometimes routed to a RJ12/4pin (usually with routers)
(2) there are several SPI channels, one connects the boot flash, that contains u-boot.
I2C and I2S are used to connect the touchscreen chip, and the sound chip, but there is a fourth channel not used, routed to a small connector.
 

Offline DiTBho

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Re: RS-232 - still alive and well
« Reply #9 on: July 30, 2021, 09:08:56 am »
For general purpose maintenance/debug/low cost device port

With Linux I haven't yet understood if it's classified as "network" device, or "char" device  ;D
 

Offline PKTKS

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Re: RS-232 - still alive and well
« Reply #10 on: July 30, 2021, 01:46:13 pm »
Have a half dozen  devices still using RS232 and COM ports

Got some COB type dongles and still wondering if I will buy one of these multi serial PCI COM port adapters to have full RS232 still ready...

Either not having the RS232 signaling levels the protocol is still required by some gizmos..

Paul
 

Offline rfclown

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Re: RS-232 - still alive and well
« Reply #11 on: July 30, 2021, 01:54:19 pm »
I'm working on new designs for military gear and RS232 is still required.
 

Offline Siwastaja

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Re: RS-232 - still alive and well
« Reply #12 on: July 30, 2021, 03:58:17 pm »
For general purpose maintenance/debug/low cost device port

With Linux I haven't yet understood if it's classified as "network" device, or "char" device  ;D

CAN is pretty specific and can't easily replace "byte stream" devices. CAN is absolutely great for certain tasks which naturally fit with the CAN's ideology - publish structured data with identifiers, no "command"-"reply" interactions - but forcing something like a byte stream through CAN is horrible use of CAN.

CAN can not (  :D ) be used as a byte stream, because a hardware-delimited CAN packet is a structured piece of data with specific fields with specific meanings, all important. All CAN implementations I have seen, including socketcan, Kvaser API and PCAN API (it sucks not to have unified API on Windows), implement such structured data; for example, socketcan exposes a CAN packet as a C struct.

In linux, as a network device, you are still limited to reading a CAN packet in a byte array using read(), but AFAIK you can be sure to get a full packet (sizeof (struct can_frame)) at once, i.e., short count should not happen. Typical pattern is

Code: [Select]
struct can_frame frame;
nbytes = read(cansoc, &frame, sizeof(struct can_frame));
if(nbytes != sizeof(struct can_frame))
{
    // unsupported failure mode, never seen this happen,
    // maybe someone can confirm if this is _guaranteed_ to never happen?
}


Worst part of CAN is that it is ungooglable due to the stupid name choice. What next, how about "is" protocol? "l" would be pretty good as well (that's a lower case L in case you didn't already notice, just for confusion.)
« Last Edit: July 30, 2021, 04:02:16 pm by Siwastaja »
 
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Online peter-h

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Re: RS-232 - still alive and well
« Reply #13 on: August 01, 2021, 02:57:17 pm »
RS232, 422, 485 will live on, because

- the chip costs peanuts (MAX232 sort of thing)
- the software overhead is ~zero (CAN USB ETH are all massive, and complicated for customers to use except in very narrow cases)
- anybody can use it, straight away

Interfacing serial comms, and making USB-serial converters, etc, is my day job and has been for 30 years. Much less demand these days, for sure, but that's because things tend to get integrated more, and as companies lose people with real skills (retirement) they install turnkey systems which naturally use closed architectures (for customer entrapment).

How much surgery has that girl had done?? :)
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Offline NiHaoMike

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Re: RS-232 - still alive and well
« Reply #14 on: August 01, 2021, 04:38:34 pm »
One thing I find lacking with both USB to serial adapters as well as "proper" UARTs on PCs is the lack of standardized support for 9 bit mode, something most microcontrollers support. That provides a good way to implement out of band framing for data values that are a multiple of 8 bits, for example binary data.
Both my Japanese PDA and laptop come with I2c and SPI. The laptop also has CAN, "RS232-4W"(1), I2C and SPI; however, I2C and SPI are only used internally(2), there is a little connector under the plastic, you can somehow access it, but you cannot connect a cable longer than 20cm, and that's the point! CAN and RS232 can be used with long cables! Even longer than 1m.
Almost every PC has I2C exposed on an external port, that's part of VGA and DVI/HDMI. It is, however, rather low bitrate. Displayport switched to its own serial protocol to work better with stuff like touchscreens.
Worst part of CAN is that it is ungooglable due to the stupid name choice. What next, how about "is" protocol? "l" would be pretty good as well (that's a lower case L in case you didn't already notice, just for confusion.)
Searching "can bus" seems to work at least on Duck Duck Go. It has been a long time since I last used Google for web searching, I suppose if it's even more garbage than it was back then, it's time to switch to something else.
How much surgery has that girl had done?? :)
She identifies as a cyborg ("part robot") so quite a bit. Funny thing is, back when I was in elementary school, I had a hard time finding friends (because I read so much about science and technology) so I wished for a robot to be my friend, a wish that kind of came true. I think her unusual appearance is to try to set herself apart from other models in technology like Xyla Foxlin and Sarah Petkus.
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Online nctnico

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Re: RS-232 - still alive and well
« Reply #15 on: August 01, 2021, 05:09:08 pm »
RS232, 422, 485 will live on, because

- the chip costs peanuts (MAX232 sort of thing)
- the software overhead is ~zero (CAN USB ETH are all massive, and complicated for customers to use except in very narrow cases)
- anybody can use it, straight away
You forget reliability. Last year I did a relatively large project which consists of several sub-units. The communication between them uses RS232. The unit itself has a USB port which identifies/works as a serial port.

Quote
How much surgery has that girl had done?? :)
Way too much if you ask me   :(
« Last Edit: August 01, 2021, 05:10:39 pm by nctnico »
There are small lies, big lies and then there is what is on the screen of your oscilloscope.
 

Online james_s

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Re: RS-232 - still alive and well
« Reply #16 on: August 01, 2021, 05:38:24 pm »
Way too much if you ask me   :(

I have a hard time taking someone seriously that tries that hard to get attention, it's a gimmick IMO, it reeks of desperation and it's distracting. She looks like she'd be working in an adult entertainment venue, not an engineering lab.
 

Offline NiHaoMike

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Re: RS-232 - still alive and well
« Reply #17 on: August 01, 2021, 06:41:54 pm »
You forget reliability. Last year I did a relatively large project which consists of several sub-units. The communication between them uses RS232. The unit itself has a USB port which identifies/works as a serial port.
Actual RS-232 or just a logic level UART? Those terms are often used interchangeably when RS-232 refers to the +-12V signal levels that operate with a UART at the core.

On reliability, it's not really true of half duplex RS-485. Most UARTs don't implement CSMA/CD in hardware so it's up to you to do it in software. It's especially problematic if the system doesn't have real time capability. (Some better USB to RS-485 adapters use a microcontroller instead of a standard USB UART for that reason.)
She looks like she'd be working in an adult entertainment venue, not an engineering lab.
I don't think she'll be a particularly great dancer with such a high center of gravity.
Cryptocurrency has taught me to love math and at the same time be baffled by it.

Cryptocurrency lesson 0: Altcoins and Bitcoin are not the same thing.
 

Online nctnico

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Re: RS-232 - still alive and well
« Reply #18 on: August 01, 2021, 08:07:09 pm »
You forget reliability. Last year I did a relatively large project which consists of several sub-units. The communication between them uses RS232. The unit itself has a USB port which identifies/works as a serial port.
Actual RS-232 or just a logic level UART? Those terms are often used interchangeably when RS-232 refers to the +-12V signal levels that operate with a UART at the core.
I mean the +/-12V levels. There shouldn't be much confusion about that though  :)
There are small lies, big lies and then there is what is on the screen of your oscilloscope.
 

Online peter-h

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Re: RS-232 - still alive and well
« Reply #19 on: August 02, 2021, 06:48:27 am »
Most products which are "boxed" and with RS232, have a swing of at least -5V to +5V. You can get that with a MAX3232, which runs from +3.3V.

There may be some which swing -3.3V to +3.3V but I haven't seen that.

The 0 to +3.3V or 0 to +5V cases tend to be board-level products e.g. development boards.

Indeed, RS232 is "reliable" because there is no chance of DHCP not working or any of the thousand other things which break the more advanced methods. Same for RS422 or RS485 which are equally cheap to implement.
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Offline Raj

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Re: RS-232 - still alive and well
« Reply #20 on: August 02, 2021, 07:07:56 am »
I highly doubt that it's the S£xy cyborg that's the brain behind her videos. People have speculated that it's her engineer husband.
I just want someone unbiased, to meet her in person and test her knowledge out.

Kasyan TV used to have a male voiceover, until it became popular. Now a female voices the channels video.


Side note:
While typing this, I realized that windows has F-ed up my keyboard settings and when I type "#", or shift 3, it prints "£" symbol.
« Last Edit: August 02, 2021, 07:12:48 am by Raj »
 

Offline NiHaoMike

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Re: RS-232 - still alive and well
« Reply #21 on: August 02, 2021, 01:37:25 pm »
I highly doubt that it's the S£xy cyborg that's the brain behind her videos. People have speculated that it's her engineer husband.
There is no husband, she's a lesbian. Also, a lot of smart Asians are also very good looking. (Look up Kitty Yeung and Xyla Foxlin for more examples in engineering.)
Cryptocurrency has taught me to love math and at the same time be baffled by it.

Cryptocurrency lesson 0: Altcoins and Bitcoin are not the same thing.
 
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Offline DiTBho

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Re: RS-232 - still alive and well
« Reply #22 on: August 02, 2021, 03:28:07 pm »
Found a couple of sonar sensors. They offer RS422 as communication link.
Nice. I can wire a 5m cable without any problem  :D
 

Offline PKTKS

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Re: RS-232 - still alive and well
« Reply #23 on: August 02, 2021, 03:38:03 pm »
Most products which are "boxed" and with RS232, have a swing of at least -5V to +5V. You can get that with a MAX3232, which runs from +3.3V.

There may be some which swing -3.3V to +3.3V but I haven't seen that.

The 0 to +3.3V or 0 to +5V cases tend to be board-level products e.g. development boards.

Indeed, RS232 is "reliable" because there is no chance of DHCP not working or any of the thousand other things which break the more advanced methods. Same for RS422 or RS485 which are equally cheap to implement.


Industry grade products are RS232 and GPIB ready ..
and LXI  counts as a feature...

No serious industry device lacks RS232 as of  today..
https://www.kikusui.co.jp/en/product/selection.php?Category=DC%20Power%20Supplies

It may vanish someday..  but not now..

Paul
 

Online nctnico

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Re: RS-232 - still alive and well
« Reply #24 on: August 03, 2021, 08:54:33 am »
You won't find RS232 on most modern test gear. USB and ethernet are standard nowadays (where USB typically mimics a serial port even if it is called USB TMC).
There are small lies, big lies and then there is what is on the screen of your oscilloscope.
 


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