Author Topic: Share files and folders between W10 and Linux.  (Read 1354 times)

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Offline luiHS

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Share files and folders between W10 and Linux.
« on: May 28, 2021, 03:44:00 pm »
Hi.

I am going to install Windows 10 and Linux (Ubuntu) on the same SSD hard disk. I also have three other hard disk with data that I currently access from Windows 7.

The question is whether it is possible that the Linux installation can access the files and folders that I now have on those three other hard disk that I access from Windows, and which are formatted as NTFS.

In particular I am interested in being able to access the files of the Thunderbird email reader, to be able to manage the email both from Windows 10 and from Linux.

I may also be interested in accessing files created with LibreOffice and others, both from W10 and from Linux. Or create files in Linux that I can later use from Windows and vice versa, the data always being on other hard drives, not on the operating system's startup disk.

« Last Edit: May 28, 2021, 03:46:33 pm by luiHS »
 

Offline fable

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Re: Share files and folders between W10 and Linux.
« Reply #1 on: May 28, 2021, 03:53:29 pm »
With Linux you can access all drives and partitions no problem but with windows you can't access Linux partition so you will need software for that
 

Offline nctnico

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Re: Share files and folders between W10 and Linux.
« Reply #2 on: May 28, 2021, 04:41:05 pm »
One way would be to run Linux or Windows in a virtual machine and access the host files through a network share. Another option is to look at WSL (running Linux under Windows directly). Both remove the requirement of dual booting which just sucks.
There are small lies, big lies and then there is what is on the screen of your oscilloscope.
 

Offline PKTKS

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Re: Share files and folders between W10 and Linux.
« Reply #3 on: May 28, 2021, 05:15:27 pm »
Waaaaaayyyyyy  back in 80s...

MS bought or "acquired" or whatever they need at time to
have some stuff to charge license fees for and literally implode
whoever gets in their way..

LAN Manager.. LANtastic.. whatever they did to rename that shit
it is a NetBIOS SMB Frankenstein dated 80s and suited to fill the
gap where Novell Netware was prevalent..

So..  by 90s they had a functional "GUI" with that  shitty services
where you are allowed to "share"  (your stuff) files.. printers..
with networked *windoozeee*  OS.. (by that time OS/2 already
had such similar SMB based stuff).. but interoperability of course
was never in the agenda..

So.. that 80s crap shit is still there..  mostly as their
solution to allow you to access your stuff (aside their new CLOUD)

Go SAMBA where that shit is functional and you can set a fully
operational interclient/server with whatever MS brain dead machine
and access all your stuff..

including printers... as long as they never ever allowed remote
printing services work as they should...

The DIGITAL LANDLORDS will never ever play nice..
you can bet that..

But any  SAMBA release  works  out of the box
as long your kernel is provided w/recent CIFS and
other shit evolved from that crap..

Paul  :-\
 

Offline coromonadalix

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Re: Share files and folders between W10 and Linux.
« Reply #4 on: May 28, 2021, 05:36:53 pm »
personally i would dual boot the computer with separate oses on each drive, you kick the bios boot option and choose the needed drive ?

Since you can use the same softwares between linux and windows :  thunderbird   libreoffice  .... i would not take the chance of fuc$#$$# something between the ose's

You have some linux utilities to dual boot a system ...  i'm not a linux fan    but i use Zorin Os  loll

If i recall  you have to install windows first,   linux based os'es  should see windows and offer a dual boot option ??

Or G-parted and Grub can help if i recall ??
 

Online Monkeh

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Re: Share files and folders between W10 and Linux.
« Reply #5 on: May 28, 2021, 06:53:00 pm »
Format one of your drives as exFAT and you can read and write to it from both systems with no difficulties. Walls of text not required.
 
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Offline themadhippy

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Re: Share files and folders between W10 and Linux.
« Reply #6 on: May 28, 2021, 07:02:55 pm »
Quote
Format one of your drives as exFAT and you can read and write to it from both systems with no difficulties
dont even need to go that far,linux plays nicely  with nfts
 

Online Monkeh

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Re: Share files and folders between W10 and Linux.
« Reply #7 on: May 28, 2021, 07:06:04 pm »
Quote
Format one of your drives as exFAT and you can read and write to it from both systems with no difficulties
dont even need to go that far,linux plays nicely  with nfts

Nicely-ish. I have limited trust in the various open implementations. Frankly, even the Windows implementation is a little.. iffy.
 

Online Ian.M

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Re: Share files and folders between W10 and Linux.
« Reply #8 on: May 28, 2021, 07:33:24 pm »
+1.  Linux NTFS support has vastly improved over the last decade or so but NTFS is a proprietary poorly documented moving target.  If a NTFS filesystem is mounted R/W under Linux, IMHO there's *still* a higher risk of corruption than for a native Linux or FAT based filesystem.
 

Offline nctnico

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Re: Share files and folders between W10 and Linux.
« Reply #9 on: May 28, 2021, 09:43:41 pm »
Quote
Format one of your drives as exFAT and you can read and write to it from both systems with no difficulties
dont even need to go that far,linux plays nicely  with nfts
I'd go for exFAT. As others said: NTFS is iffy and not without it's problems.
There are small lies, big lies and then there is what is on the screen of your oscilloscope.
 

Offline retiredfeline

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Re: Share files and folders between W10 and Linux.
« Reply #10 on: May 28, 2021, 11:17:49 pm »
In particular I am interested in being able to access the files of the Thunderbird email reader, to be able to manage the email both from Windows 10 and from Linux.

I may also be interested in accessing files created with LibreOffice and others, both from W10 and from Linux.

This is iffy and the devil is in the details for each program. A program or suite may be cross-platform but that doesn't mean the internal file formats will be the same for all platforms.

For LibreOffice, the file formats should be interchangeable given that they can be exported. For Thunderbird's mail folders, I would check for howto's of people who have tried it, and any special things they had to do. I seem to remember that it can be made to work, but check before you risk your mail files.
 

Offline PKTKS

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Re: Share files and folders between W10 and Linux.
« Reply #11 on: May 29, 2021, 07:44:26 pm »
Judging by some comments it seems that some folks just
forgotten how MS changed their *.INI  files more or less circa
version Win-2000 to complete REGISTRY stored keys..

Several important programs aspects and data became hidden
inside that crap unmanageable crock of...

Even the "recent file list" on vast majority applets are hidden
in registry keys.. that said it is unlikely programs wo access
to that crap would work as they should..  expect weird stuff.

That said .. as pointed all my VMs are interoperable using SAMBA SMB/CIFS
among them in which I can access what matters on same machine
or ....  remote machines...

Far from ideal but better than nothing and "SAFE" as it should be.

Truth is .. ditch that crap windooozzzee ASAP..   :palm:
Paul
« Last Edit: May 29, 2021, 07:46:12 pm by PKTKS »
 

Online Monkeh

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Re: Share files and folders between W10 and Linux.
« Reply #12 on: May 29, 2021, 07:49:33 pm »
Judging by some comments it seems that some folks just
forgotten how MS changed their *.INI  files more or less circa
version Win-2000 to complete REGISTRY stored keys..

Or we're aware of the irrelevance of the registry for programs designed to operate effectively on multiple platforms, and aren't justifying useless rants.
 
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Offline PKTKS

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Re: Share files and folders between W10 and Linux.
« Reply #13 on: May 29, 2021, 08:20:36 pm »
Your insults always make my days...   :clap:

so far I am still trying to find these programs
"designed to work everywhere..."

May be ..some day...
Thanks for your always kind suggestions..

Paul  ^-^
 

Offline Siwastaja

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Re: Share files and folders between W10 and Linux.
« Reply #14 on: May 30, 2021, 06:49:22 am »
Really, haven't seen any issues whatsoever in linux NTFS support in years. It's a really common use case.

No need to overthink it, most likely it Just Works out of the box; in other words, install Windows, then install Linux, all Windows partitions are directly available in Linux.

Opposite way requires more work - i.e., installing linux filesystem (ext4 or whatever) drivers in Windows.

 

Offline ejeffrey

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Re: Share files and folders between W10 and Linux.
« Reply #15 on: June 05, 2021, 04:51:13 pm »
Yeah NTFS under linux pretty much just works for ages.

WSL can mount and access ext4 filesystems but native windows apps can't without installing  a third party driver.  I think WSL takes over the entire device so that is an argument for using separate drives for Windows and Linux.

I used to use the ext2 filesystem driver for Windows in the windows XP days, I'm not sure what the status of that is these days.
 

Online magic

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Re: Share files and folders between W10 and Linux.
« Reply #16 on: June 07, 2021, 01:26:43 pm »
I was under impression that exFAT is a pile of rubbish barely better than FAT32.

NTFS works and is easy to recover data from if SHTF. Not sure what the objections are, did MS screw something up in recent years? I have been pretty much Windows-free for the last decade, so perhaps not up to date.
 

Offline mansaxel

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Re: Share files and folders between W10 and Linux.
« Reply #17 on: June 07, 2021, 02:35:57 pm »
In general, I am incompetent, and have a bad attention span. Still, I want things to work immediately, and without fuss. Therefore, I run one OS per computer, and communicate between the systems using networks.  If the number of physical computers is to low, there's virtualisation. Further, I believe that important files belong on a computer with UPS and mirrored drives, where backups are taken regularly, in some form of climate controlled facility. This gives the added benefit of making them available to several computers simultaneously, again via networking.

My particular file system perversion is OpenAFS (on FreeBSD with ZFS storage), but that is not for everyone. A FreeNAS install is more likely to fulfil people's needs; then there's SMB and NFS.

So, my advice is to do it differently, if at all possible. Dual-boot sucks (you're always in the one OS when you need an utility only available in the other) and is risky.

Offline Calaverasgrande

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Re: Share files and folders between W10 and Linux.
« Reply #18 on: June 07, 2021, 03:14:25 pm »
Linux and MacOS for that matter, have no trouble with NTFS, ExFAt, Fat32 etc.
I'd go with Fat32 or ExFat simply to avoid any permissions conflicts when two differenet operating systems are taking turns on a filesystem with clunky permissions.
When I worked in broadcast this was a very real issue.

Also, having gone down this road many times, I'd heavily advise against trying to put two OS on one disc.
I've never seen Windows happy like this. Even if you partition the disc into volumes you still have to wrangle a bootloader that they will both be happy with. UEFI only makes this worse.
It's much more preferable to have them on distinct drives and choose which is the boot drive from BIOS, or a Linux loader.
 

Offline Karel

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Re: Share files and folders between W10 and Linux.
« Reply #19 on: June 07, 2021, 03:33:54 pm »
NTFS-3G and Ntfsprogs

NTFS-3G is a stable, full-featured, read/write NTFS driver for Linux, Android, macOS, Mac OS X, FreeBSD, NetBSD, OpenSolaris, QNX, Haiku, and other operating systems.
It provides safe handling of the Windows XP, Windows Server 2003, Windows 2000, Windows Vista, Windows Server 2008, Windows 7, Windows 8 and Windows 10 NTFS file systems.
NTFS-3G uses the FUSE file system interface.

Ntfsprogs is a set of utilities for managing and interacting with NTFS partitions. In 2011, we merged Ntfsprogs with NTFS-3G.
The project is licensed under the GNU General Public License v2 (GPLv2)

It's installed by default by most distro's.

https://www.tuxera.com/company/open-source/

 

Offline evb149

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Re: Share files and folders between W10 and Linux.
« Reply #20 on: June 07, 2021, 05:54:43 pm »
As has been said, you can store things to share in FAT32 or NTFS based file systems if you construct the disc format / partitioning and file system format in compatible ways.
I'm not sure about details like DOS partitioning or GPT or whatever else may be possible that's a bit better than the most legacy DOS / Win2k compatible option.
Obviously don't turn on stuff like bitlocker and tread carefully if you want to use things like compression etc. in case there are compatibility issues between OSs.

That all being said there may be a simpler and possibly better option.  I get that you have a few local data drives attached to the particular computer and it sounds like you're
dual booting anyway.  Though I have to wonder what you're using for backups and file servers and so forth when you want to share and preserve data outside of that particular PC?

If you had a suitable file server or NAS or such you might just be able to put the data file systems to be shared on the NAS / server, then access them from both
platforms via either / both of CIFS / SAMBA or NFS for multi-platform accessibility and data sharing / centralization facilitation.

Having it shared from a server also may help data integrity since then you would have more choices like RAID backed storage whereas you'd have to be both careful and brave
to try to dual boot between LINUX and windoze and have a software based RAID as well as a file system shared between the two OSs in a fully compatible way.

Personally I'd also question the dual booting strategy.  You could possibly just run linux and virtualize windows under linux or run windows and use either WSL or a full VM to run your linux environment then you'd have simultaneous access to applications / tools / data that is unique to each environment as well as simplifying the data disc sharing between the two because
the VM layer should have simple options to share mounts / directories / files etc.

 

Offline Calaverasgrande

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Re: Share files and folders between W10 and Linux.
« Reply #21 on: June 12, 2021, 11:26:58 pm »
another consideration.
There has been a huge uptick in malware and hacker activity in general over the last decade.
When I got into IT work dealing with malware was an occasional thing.
In the last few years it has become a huge part of enterprise computing.
We once had our postal meter hacked! Which by the way was running Linux, so if anyone thinks Linux is so cool it doesn't get hacked...
I can reel off a bunch of funny anecdotes about hackers, malware etc.
But the point is that malware is on the minds of people who engineer these operating systems.
For this reason Windows is going to look sideways at any other operating system it finds on "their storage".
That is what a some remote Access Tools look like. Distros!
Microsoft knows that some people dual boot. But it's just not as robust about this as MACOS or Linux.
Then there is that god damned Windows 10 update thing.
Good luck having that continue to play nice with another operating system once you have them cooperating.
I've seen Win 10 automatic updates take down all kinds of normal software. And more than once just wreck a good system to the point we erased it and started over.
 

Offline ebclr

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Re: Share files and folders between W10 and Linux.
« Reply #22 on: June 13, 2021, 05:29:16 am »
https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/wsl/about

You also have the option to use VMware for virtual machines with Linus, in this case, will be a graphical drag and drop, ins any direction
 

Offline Karel

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Re: Share files and folders between W10 and Linux.
« Reply #23 on: June 13, 2021, 06:33:52 am »
I believe the best approach is single boot Linux, with VMware to run windows
(or Virtualbox for maker/hobbyist/home use).

Ofcourse, make sure your pc is Linux compatibel, specially the graphics card.
Do NOT use nvida cards! Use AMD with the default opensource drivers.
Do NOT install any closedsource videodrivers.

On Linux you can assign a directory which content will be shared with windows.
In windows this appears as a networkdrive. Files can be shared in both directions.

This is the most safe and reliable setup.


In the past I have used a Linux windows 7 dualboot setup using separate harddisks.
Windows was installed first on the first harddisk and Linux after that on the second.
The bootloader was Grub.
This worked reasonably apart from that you can't use both systems at the same time which is a pitty.
Then, after some years, microsoft started to release some updates that required to restart the pc,
continued to install some update, and restarted the pc again. Some of these updates didn't play well with
a dualboot with Linux (Grub). During the second phase of the installation of the update, windows reported
that it was not able to install the update and reverted it. It puzzled me but after some time I discovered
that, when I disconnected the second harddisk with Linux and instructed the bios to boot from the first disk,
the installation of these problematic updates went fine.
So, from that moment, every time when there were new updates, I risked to loose time caused by some
windows update that didn't play nice with Grub and dualboot Linux and I had to open the pc, disconnect the
sata cable to the second disk, change a bios setting, boot windows, perform the problematic update,
and do everything again in the reverse order.

So, after some more time I decided that enough was enough and I pulled out the windows disk,
installed virtualbox and windows on top of Linux.

I couldn't be more happier.

I don't know if these problems still exist with windows 10. I'm not going to try because over the years I
have lost all my trust in microsoft and even if they changed their nasty behaviour, I'll continue to avoid them
like the plague, just because of what they did in the past.
Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, shame on me.
 

Offline evb149

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Re: Share files and folders between W10 and Linux.
« Reply #24 on: June 13, 2021, 10:30:35 am »
Speaking from painful personal experience I've been pretty poorly served by both nvidia and amd in terms
of linux drivers.  Even though amd has quasi-semi-eventually open sourced parts of their video driver / GPU related codes and hardware documents, as far as I know vast amounts of the driver and other GPU support code isn't open source.
And where there was open sourced information sometimes they took so long to release it that the current generation
cards were basically obsolete before anything but basic "yeah I can see the screen" support actually was available.
So with AMD cards one could either use the open source drivers / windowing support stuff and that would often be adequate
if one wanted to "just see the screen" and have very basic accelerated 2D/3D support.  But if one wanted anything better
than that like a more full set of accelerated 3D, good OpenCL / GPGPU support, GPU card / video settings management utilities that worked comprehensively, etc. you'd often be out of luck.
And you'd have to look at the open source stacks hardware compatibility lists to even see what features were supported for a given GPU model / architecture.  And since AMD changed architectures pretty much every generation, typically new cards were lagged behind in even basic support years.

Or you could use the AMD proprietary drivers / tools, but then they would only work with certain kernel versions, after
not very long of a time they'd often declare a product "end of support life" which basically meant that if you wanted to use a newer Xorg version or newer kernel version your final-available-version EOL'ed video drivers wouldn't work at all with the next
LTS version of your LINUX (e.g. Ubuntu LTS or such).  And because new cards would be slowish to support well you might
have the current LTS version of linux be 1 years old coincidentally when AMD released the new card generation, then forward to a year or so later by the time the support might be out for relatively stable use with that LTS, then if you're lucky you might be able to run the next LTS before AMD would stop supporting that card generation for kernel / Xorg so basically you'd be trapped on that LTS version or maybe that +1.

NVIDIA: No choice to reallty run the open source drivers unless ALL you want is "yeah I can see the screen, usually".
No likelihood of good open source acceleration, video card / screen management utilities, OpenCL, CUDA support, AIML support, etc.
But if you do run the NVIDIA drivers you get stuck with whatever kernel / Xorg versions they support which often won't be really recent ones, so you may end up running an outdated LINUX version just to have the GPU drivers work.
Then same issues as AMD  with "end of life" card driver support when the card itself may only be a couple/few years old and you can't even move up to the next LTS linux that comes out if it has much newer kernel / Xorg.

And Vulkan linux window environment support is a royal mess for NVIDIA; don't know about AMD.

I don't think either one is commendable until you can:

1: Run CUDA / OpenCL / AIML / GPU X / GPU Vulkan with good acceleration.
2: Run that with open source support.
3: Be able to run at least the next 2-3 LTS release versions of linux and have the thing work with the current kernel / X / Vulkan for those after purchasing any card model that is available new.
4: Have accelerated video codec / playback support that works well in LINUX and is open sourced.

That said, if you can live with NVIDIA's bad support of LINUX in their closed drivers, at least you tend to get more stuff that works moderately well from the NVIDIA drivers than the AMD drivers.  e.g. relatively up to date AIML / CUDA / OpenCL support and such as opposed to historically not so much so in AMD.  I hear AMD has been trying to improve some of that, we'll see how that goes later in this generation.

Currently though you can't even BUY a decent NVIDIA or AMD GPU unless you make a 6-month long quest for the holy grail out of shopping, so the choice is academic.



I believe the best approach is single boot Linux, with VMware to run windows
(or Virtualbox for maker/hobbyist/home use).

Ofcourse, make sure your pc is Linux compatibel, specially the graphics card.
Do NOT use nvida cards! Use AMD with the default opensource drivers.
Do NOT install any closedsource videodrivers.

 


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