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SSD RAID or something else

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tszaboo:
I've run into some computing problem today. So in my home desktop, I had this 240Gb SSD for the last 6 years. And it got used up. Every now and then Windows became a slog, drive write speeds dropped to 1MB/sec and the system just became absolutely unresponsive. It took me a lot of time to track it to the SSD.
Fortunately, I keep backups. And this only has installed software, not actual data. But also reinstalling everything takes a huge amount of time (and even more to set up all the software with all the settings), so I tried cloning the drive... And now my saturday is gone. Because 2 software ended up not doing it, and searching for solutions, several CHKDSK and so on. Now I have a linux distro doing a clone, for the last 4 hours...
So I dont want to deal with this sort of things, really. Seeing that a 512Gb SSD is like 50 EUR, I can throw in 2 in the computer, configure RAID 1 and hope for the best. Or is this the best way to keep the computer running, if a drive fails? Every 2 year, place a new drive in, throw out one of the old one, to keep the write levels down?
Or do you guys just reinstall everything every few years?

oPossum:
My solution is eight SSD in RAID 6 with an LSI 9270 controller. I'm not suggesting that is a good solution, but it is tolerant of 2 drive failure and preforms almost as well as a ordinary NVME SSD (that I can't really use in my current system). It is all old stuff than can be had for cheap.

ogden:

--- Quote from: NANDBlog on February 08, 2020, 09:31:02 pm ---And it got used up.

--- End quote ---

SSD rule #1: never fill drive completely with partition or files. Leave minimum 10% free space so drive have room for Garbage Collection (background erase), Wear Levelling and TRIM. Full SSD is slow because garbage collection can't keep-up, drive in result do not have enough pre-erased sectors for quick writes, it has to wait for erased sectors to become available. Erase+write obviously is much slower than write operation alone. AFAIK full SSD's wear-out (tend to fail) faster as well, yet it may differ from drive to drive make/model.

Fully agree that RAID1 is next best thing you can do to your SSD & data.

tszaboo:

--- Quote from: ogden on February 08, 2020, 10:24:30 pm ---
--- Quote from: NANDBlog on February 08, 2020, 09:31:02 pm ---And it got used up.

--- End quote ---

SSD rule #1: never fill drive completely with partition or files. Leave minimum 10% free space so drive have room for Garbage Collection (background erase), Wear Levelling and TRIM. Full SSD is slow because garbage collection can't keep-up, drive in result do not have enough pre-erased sectors for quick writes, it has to wait for erased sectors to become available. Erase+write obviously is much slower than write operation alone. AFAIK full SSD's wear-out (tend to fail) faster as well, yet it may differ from drive to drive make/model.

Fully agree that RAID1 is next best thing you can do to your SSD & data.

--- End quote ---
Oh the slow write is not even the worst. It started to have bad sectors, that took a very long time to respond. So it was failing silently, and it was bringing my productivity down. Or spoiled the gaming night (yes, I do that sometimes). 6 years ago probably the GC wasnt that fleshed out, but they always overprovision the drives. This 240GB model probably had 256 GB Flash on it. BTW, cloning still in progress, I really hope I dont have to erase the new drive and start installing windows...

sokoloff:
From where you're starting, I'd be using Linux to do a dd clone of the drive to a new one (as it sounds like you're doing). Get the data off and leave the gimped drive set aside for a while. Then, see where you're at with that one performance-wise. (Verify that it was an SSD issue and not a Windows OS issue.)

I'm a Mac guy for the last 4-5 years and have done several machine migrations, with this most recent one being the only one that I set up from scratch again. In the Windows world, I used to pave and re-install my machine every couple of years back in the 3.1/NT/XP/7 days. I had a Server2K8 machine that ran well for 6+ years as a daily driver, with no re-paves and no boot drive changes. Not enough experience with 10 yet to say (my parents run 10 and so I get roped in to support them at times).

I wouldn't think that going to RAID 1 on new drives would solve the issue you're facing now. Going to bigger drives (500GB) and under partitioning them (allocate 300 GB and leave 200GB for wear leveling and remapping) might help. I use backups to protect my data and I'm willing to go reinstall apps if I ever need to do so.

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