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Updating SSD firmware on SAMSUNG drives...

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wraper:

--- Quote from: Monkeh on June 21, 2021, 03:29:22 pm ---I had to replace a motherboard earlier in the year because a BIOS update broke VT-d catastrophically and there's no way to roll back and no hope of getting it fixed.

--- End quote ---
Desolder Flash IC and program with $2.50 programmer

Monkeh:

--- Quote from: wraper on June 21, 2021, 03:58:15 pm ---
--- Quote from: Monkeh on June 21, 2021, 03:29:22 pm ---I had to replace a motherboard earlier in the year because a BIOS update broke VT-d catastrophically and there's no way to roll back and no hope of getting it fixed.

--- End quote ---
Desolder Flash IC and program with $2.50 programmer

--- End quote ---

Yes, and it's only a seven and a half hour flight away. Getting someone remotely to replace the board was a lot faster and less problematic than trying that..

Wuerstchenhund:

--- Quote from: Monkeh on June 21, 2021, 03:29:22 pm ---
--- Quote from: Wuerstchenhund on June 21, 2021, 02:36:34 pm ---SSD (and BIOS updates) should be treated like OS updates, i.e. you make sure you're on the latest version to avoid  problems later on. They are usually non-destructive (the time when a fw update wiped a SSD has long been gone) and are generally very reliable. You certainly don't want to risk your data encountering a problem that has already been fixed.

--- End quote ---

Ahh.. I had to replace a motherboard earlier in the year because a BIOS update broke VT-d catastrophically and there's no way to roll back and no hope of getting it fixed.

--- End quote ---

Most mainboards made in the last 10 years or so have a recovery function where you can flash a new BIOS in an unrecoverable board without any version checks, which should allow you to flash an older version.

Although, really, if a vendor releases a BIOS update which messes up something so basic as VT-d support then that says a lot about the (lack of) proper QA and I would seriously question if it's sensible to rely on that particular vendor's products.

Monkeh:

--- Quote from: Wuerstchenhund on June 21, 2021, 05:05:12 pm ---
--- Quote from: Monkeh on June 21, 2021, 03:29:22 pm ---
--- Quote from: Wuerstchenhund on June 21, 2021, 02:36:34 pm ---SSD (and BIOS updates) should be treated like OS updates, i.e. you make sure you're on the latest version to avoid  problems later on. They are usually non-destructive (the time when a fw update wiped a SSD has long been gone) and are generally very reliable. You certainly don't want to risk your data encountering a problem that has already been fixed.

--- End quote ---

Ahh.. I had to replace a motherboard earlier in the year because a BIOS update broke VT-d catastrophically and there's no way to roll back and no hope of getting it fixed.

--- End quote ---

Most mainboards made in the last 10 years or so have a recovery function where you can flash a new BIOS in an unrecoverable board without any version checks, which should allow you to flash an older version.

Although, really, if a vendor releases a BIOS update which messes up something so basic as VT-d support then that says a lot about the (lack of) proper QA and I would seriously question if it's sensible to rely on that particular vendor's products.

--- End quote ---

No attempt at a recovery flash resulted in a downgrade. As for the vendor, that'd be Asus. One of their higher end boards, too. It's all a sea of garbage and assuming any of these vendors won't break things will bite.

Samsung are, perhaps, slightly more trustworthy - but it's worth noting the reason I took the opportunity to upgrade the BIOS on that board is it was out of service due to a desperately early failure of an extremely lightly used Samsung SSD..

Wuerstchenhund:

--- Quote from: Monkeh on June 21, 2021, 05:13:00 pm ---No attempt at a recovery flash resulted in a downgrade. As for the vendor, that'd be Asus. One of their higher end boards, too. It's all a sea of garbage and assuming any of these vendors won't break things will bite.
--- End quote ---

Probably true, although I can't say as I stopped building PCs myself a very long time ago.


--- Quote ---Samsung are, perhaps, slightly more trustworthy - but it's worth noting the reason I took the opportunity to upgrade the BIOS on that board is it was out of service due to a desperately early failure of an extremely lightly used Samsung SSD..

--- End quote ---

I'm not surprised, we had quite a few premature failures of Samsung SSDs so we stopped using them.

I'm not sure why they are so highly rated, they might be better than many other consumer-grade SSDs but even their enterprise SSDs left me underwhelmed.

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