Products > Computers

W11 - Worth upgrading from W10 ?

<< < (17/17)

james_s:

--- Quote from: tooki on June 13, 2022, 04:29:58 pm ---I remember when computers were so slow (very early 1990s) that a standard part of benchmarking in computer magazines was recalculating large Lotus 1-2-3 or Excel spreadsheets, because the difference between an entry level machine and a top of the line one could be 45 seconds vs. 15 seconds. That's a real, palpable difference. Only a few years later, they removed the "recalculate" command altogether because it was something that could be done in real time. It used to be that photography was an extremely high-end application, now it's something that (at least when implemented with some brains) is happy on almost anything: graphic artists no longer need to be as high up on the performance scale as they once did. When I started my career in IT, professional standard-definition video editing required machines with tons of specialized hardware and massive disk arrays (The video never even passed through the CPU: the computer was simply the host and user interface for dedicated hardware). SD (and HD) video editing is something modern systems can do in their sleep.

I also think it's important to point out that games have basically redefined what high-end means. GPU development isn't driven by high-end professional graphics (engineering workstations, etc) any more, it's driven by games. A GPU that's modest for modern games is, frankly, quite capable for a whole lot of engineering software. (The main difference between "pro" cards like the Quadro line is the drivers, which are optimized for accuracy over speed, whereas the gaming drivers are optimized for speed at the expense of accuracy. As an aside, on the Mac, there's never been this distinction, with the drivers all more or less corresponding to the pro drivers on Windows. That's why software that demands a pro GPU on Windows is perfectly happy with the equivalent gaming GPU on the Mac.) It used to be SGI pushing GPU capabilities forward for money-is-no-object level of high end applications. Less than a decade after $250,000 each SGI Onyx systems were needed to create the liquid metal in Terminator 2, SGI was moribund and Maya, the descendant of the software used to make that film, was running happily on Mac OS X and Windows NT on commodity hardware, thanks to games pushing GPU development forward at a tremendous pace.

Similarly, the growth of standard computer performance is why the high-end UNIX workstations (SGI, Sun, etc.) all died out. Mainstream hardware caught up with them, so there was no longer any justification to spend the enormous R&D costs to design those things.

--- End quote ---

For many years the computers I could afford were never really powerful enough and they quickly became hopelessly obsolete. Now my daily driver laptop was made in 2015 and I'm typing this on a 2011 made Thinkpad since my main laptop suffered a hardware failure and I haven't had a chance to rebuild it from some parts machines I bought and for day to day use this thing is plenty capable. I can't tell the difference in speed between this and brand new Macbooks at work. Computers got so fast that it just doesn't even matter anymore for most things, even a 10 year old PC is perfectly fine for about 98% of use cases.

james_s:

--- Quote from: austfox on June 14, 2022, 02:33:19 pm ---I put together a new computer for home use and installed a fresh copy of W11. About 4 hours in and all my programs were installed, drives setup the way I like them, desktops customised, and the whole thing just works without any issue.

W11 was a free upgrade from W10... W10 was a free upgrade from W7... and I've been around long enough to remember when DOS was AUD $150, Windows 95 for around the same price, and OS/2 was well over the $200 mark (maybe half the weekly wage back then).

I realise the money to be made nowadays is in data collection and App purchases, but since W11 has been working 'out of the box' for me, I can't complain.

--- End quote ---

Upgrade LOL

I consider Win10 a substantial downgrade from Win7. I've used both extensively and there is no comparison, I got so sick of fighting with Win10 at a former job that I have never looked back, upgrading to 7 was a breath of fresh air. I recently picked up another laptop that came with Win11 so I played around with that for a bit, not sure if it's better or worse than 10, the start menu is hot garbage though. They keep messing with it and it STILL is not half as capable as the start menu in Win7. I wish they'd just throw the Win7 UI on top of the Win11 framework and ditch all the telemetry and other trash, then they'd have a solid OS that I'd actually pay for.

Mechatrommer:

--- Quote from: james_s on June 15, 2022, 09:57:07 pm ---not sure if it's better or worse than 10, the start menu is hot garbage though. They keep messing with it and it STILL is not half as capable as the start menu in Win7.

--- End quote ---
currently using Win7 on 13yrs old PC, soon upgrading to Win10 on another older 7yrs old but upgraded to maxed PC. if talking about start menu, i still miss WinXP start menu... no need to scrollbar, all apps can fit in a screen for quick browsing. but its a second issue (after Windows Explorer) as i've workaround of putting my frequently used apps on desktop screen and taskbar. but digging seldomly used apps in start menu, WinXP is still the best... my need for newer Windows is only due to be able to run newer apps/features that cant be run on WinXP anymore, and security update is the second reason. the kids in M$ who develops newer Windows only think of appearance rather than practicality, maybe due to the majority of kids out there requesting it in their Users Experience Surveys.

tooki:

--- Quote from: james_s on June 15, 2022, 09:54:21 pm ---For many years the computers I could afford were never really powerful enough and they quickly became hopelessly obsolete. Now my daily driver laptop was made in 2015 and I'm typing this on a 2011 made Thinkpad since my main laptop suffered a hardware failure and I haven't had a chance to rebuild it from some parts machines I bought and for day to day use this thing is plenty capable. I can't tell the difference in speed between this and brand new Macbooks at work. Computers got so fast that it just doesn't even matter anymore for most things, even a 10 year old PC is perfectly fine for about 98% of use cases.

--- End quote ---
Exactly!!! In fact, until I got my Windows laptop last winter for school, my daily drivers were my 2008 Mac Pro and 2012 MacBook Air.

The only reason they struggle at all with my everyday stuff is because I tend to leave a bajillion browser windows open. (Indeed, particularly with the Mac Pro, the ever-growing problem wasn't performance, but software compatibility, since it doesn't support recent versions of macOS, and I've been too lazy to look into the hacks to get newer versions on it.) Asking the MacBook to run Windows in a VM with all my other stuff open at the same time was simply asking too much, so I got the Windows laptop for school. And realistically, Altium struggled in a VM on either machine, since VirtualBox's GPU support is... modest.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[*] Previous page

There was an error while thanking
Thanking...
Go to full version