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Yet another bad pixel rant

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blueskull:
So, I've been recently buying and returning 4 Acer Swift 7 and 1 Dell XPS 13, both are $1700 integrated GPU ultrabooks, so supposedly they should have perfect quality control.
To my surprise, all 5 units have at least one bad pixel and one has very bad backlight bleeding (not surprised since it's a Dell), one has a defective keyboard.
I was not looking for cheapies. I'm paying between $1.3k to $1.9k on an iGPU laptop, and it should have basic respect to its price tag.

What's wrong with the PC market? I've never seen those problems with a Mac, rest of a 2010 lowest end Air.
I don't need a Mac. MacOS is getting unusable as they abandon and deprecate OpenGL. OGL performance is miserable, and I can't even play CSGO with an external RX570.
Parallels is buggy, and it's becoming a limiting factor of Altium in 3D. Thus I need a real PC. Virtualization sounded good, but it is not.

Is there a PC brand that can be called premium that can stack up with Apple in terms of quality in 2019?

Ampera:
This might be a stupid question, but aren't Macs just Unix PCs? Use a different operating system if the hardware in them is good for you.

maginnovision:
My current HP laptop had no bad pixels in the 4k display when I bought it. I took it to Colorado for a trip where it developed one stuck red, one stuck blue, and one stuck green pixel. I was busy at the time but planned on sending it back for fixing(they have a pretty good policy in practice). I never did and... They've fixed themselves. None stuck on, even partially, or off.

rrinker:
 The various Microsoft Surface models are top build quality. Not all of them are tablets or glorified tablets, they do have serious power models.

 Our company buys us all exclusively HP stuff (except sales, they get Surfaces), and I've had mine for goign on 2 years now with no issues, no parts breaking or feeling like they are about to break, the screen has no dead pixels, the hinge is nice and sturdy. It's not a touch screen (a plus in my book). It's fairly light weight, but it's not an ultra slim - you can open it up and the drive(s) (it has an m.2 AND SATA drive bay) are not soldered on, and neither is the RAM. No discrete GPU in this model, I don;t think it's even an option, but the integrated one works fine for EasyEDA, even the 3D views, and my 3D CAD, plus app dev tools and SQL Server. Since it's not an ultra slim design, it has real ports - multiple USBs, an actual Ethernet port (GbE), DVI, and VGA. BT (I think 4.0, this is actually 2 generations old now), 802.11ac wifi, optional cellular. The newer ones have betetr processors, mien has an i7-6600U so only 2 cores with hyperthreading, but I still run multiple VMs with no problem, I have 32GB RAM. This is the EliteBook 840 G3, current model is the G6 I think, with several improvements. Oh and you CAN get a discrete GPU in this model, Radeon RX 550. Just checked the HP page, it's fully customizable, so you can order it with the CPU you want but smallest memory and smallest SSD, and upgrade those yourself, and save a LOT, as with everyone, the price of the extra RAM and bigger drives is all out of proportion to what those things really cost. And HP still has service guides with parts lists and procedures, and you can buy spare parts to fix these things yourself.
 

Ampera:

--- Quote from: blueskull on October 23, 2019, 11:00:50 pm ---
--- Quote from: Ampera on October 23, 2019, 10:50:58 pm ---This might be a stupid question, but aren't Macs just Unix PCs? Use a different operating system if the hardware in them is good for you.

--- End quote ---

Windows driver is not complete. Not all hardware features are supported, and power management is bad.

--- End quote ---

What about Linux?

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