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[UK] Job ad: Wanted, electronic engineer

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KJDS:

--- Quote from: Howardlong on February 01, 2015, 08:45:32 am ---
--- Quote from: mojo-chan on January 31, 2015, 11:33:45 pm ---I find that the bad contractors often get brought back repeatedly because it isn't obvious to management that they are bad. The product kinda works and when it needs updating they just get the same person back to do it. Sure, it takes them longer because of the crap design, but management doesn't know that.

The good contractors tend to become permanent anyway.

--- End quote ---

Interesting comments MC, because when I was doing contracts I found it was exactly the opposite!
....

--- End quote ---

I was going to respond to that last night with the reply "boolox" but I'd had a few beers so thought it prudent not to comment.

I'm now sober, therefore I'm happy to say that good contractors becoming permies is indeed, bollox. I know about 100 contractors, one of whom has become a permie. The rest are still enjoying the benefits of contracting, as are quite a few of the permies I'd got to know.

Stonent:
I find in my line of work, IT, there tend to be a lot of people who just don't really understand in depth how things work.

Maybe I'd be an a-hole for doing it, but I'd consider asking an applicant to start at the outlet and describe in detail how a computer starts up all the way until the desktop is ready.

or "How might you install a driver that can't boot due to lack of that driver?"

I'd be impressed if I found someone who knows how to use the windows debugger to read crash-dump files.

GK:

--- Quote from: linux-works on January 26, 2015, 11:06:19 pm ---it would be nice to see more job ads on this forum.
--- End quote ---


I once had a similar thought; even suggested an employment classifieds section to the forum. However now considering the amount of bullshit that appears to get posted in every single job thread, I don't think so any longer.

Howardlong:

--- Quote from: Stonent on February 01, 2015, 11:38:54 am ---I find in my line of work, IT, there tend to be a lot of people who just don't really understand in depth how things work.

Maybe I'd be an a-hole for doing it, but I'd consider asking an applicant to start at the outlet and describe in detail how a computer starts up all the way until the desktop is ready.

or "How might you install a driver that can't boot due to lack of that driver?"

I'd be impressed if I found someone who knows how to use the windows debugger to read crash-dump files.

--- End quote ---

I've been out of IT for a couple of years now, but I was in it in one form or another since the mid 70s and I agree. Knowing the fundamentals helps you identify problems as entire systems as opposed to the more typical blinkered approach. The typical programmer says the immortal phrase "it's a network problem" when they haven't really go a clue, the network guy says it's a server problem, and the server guy says it's an app problem. Having an open mind and a broad range of skills is automatically nurtured by knowing the fundamentals, but nowadays people are pigeon holed and having a broad range of skills isn't valued.

I'd have loved it if someone had asked me to start at the outlet in an interview, they might end up with quite a bit more than they bargained for that's for sure.

Not sure if I could answer your other two questions nowadays, although at one point in my career I did write quite a number of graphics drivers for Windows 2.0, 2.1 and 3.0, back in the days where a good deal of that stuff was still in assembler, and you counted your instruction cycles. We used Symdeb back then, but more recently it became windbg and I think KD? or something, plus you needed a bunch of OS symbol files appropriate to your OS version (there were also debug versions of some Windows versions, not sure if that still applies) to figure out. As you can prolly tell it's been a while...

Galenbo:

--- Quote from: KJDS on January 31, 2015, 08:59:37 pm ---I went to see a customer a few years ago and he was in a bad mood, having spent his morning teaching people with Masters degrees to solder.

I pointed out that I'd rather spend a morning teaching someone to solder then a couple of months to get them proficient in control theory.

--- End quote ---

So why doesn't he hire Masters that have proven their skills to solder?
Was their management course result more important?

I solder since I was 12 years old, including plastic toys.

Chances are that the ones that can solder are way better in control theory, too.
Not in repeating the graphs, words and formulas, but in looking at the result and defining possible shortcomings.

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