Author Topic: "udemy" IT technical courses - have an impact for perception of employee?  (Read 8961 times)

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Offline FlyingDutchTopic starter

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Hello Forum,

I want to ask if completing the "udemy" technical courses and obtaining a certificate of completion, impact the employer's perception of the employee. I found several of these courses interesting from the point of view of my work. For example, I have finished such courses:

ARM Assembly Language From Ground Up™ 1​
x86 Assembly Language Programming From Ground Up™​
Mastering Microcontroller and Embedded Driver Development​
Function Acceleration on FPGA with Vitis-Part 1: Fundamental​
FPGA Embedded Design, Part 4 - Microprocessor Design​
Write Your Own Operating System From Scratch - Step by Step​
PLC Programming - Structured Programming and Design Patterns​


I have dealt with these topics before, but these courses introduced a lot of new things that I didn't know before. Working with the source code of the projects was particularly important and interesting (especially programs in x64 assembly: FPU usage, MMX instructions, SSE Extensions, Advanced Vector Extensions). I am wondering if from an employer's perception completing such courses matters at all?
What is your opinion - please share it with me.

Best Regards
 
 

Offline tggzzz

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Re: "udemy" IT technical courses - have an impact for perception of employee?
« Reply #1 on: December 26, 2023, 04:53:51 pm »
No idea about those specific courses.

 "Completed" doesn't mean anything to me. It might just mean you turned up every day, and didn't drool over the keyboard.

I would be interested in how the courses had changed your understanding. That would give an indirect indication of what you didn't know and how you learned to improve. I would push your understanding to find out what you know you don't know.

What matters to me was what you achieved, and what you have done beyond the normal requirements. I would like seeing you set realistic goals that stretch you, what/why you did/didn't complete, and what you would do differently next time.
There are lies, damned lies, statistics - and ADC/DAC specs.
Glider pilot's aphorism: "there is no substitute for span". Retort: "There is a substitute: skill+imagination. But you can buy span".
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Offline FlyingDutchTopic starter

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Re: "udemy" IT technical courses - have an impact for perception of employee?
« Reply #2 on: December 26, 2023, 05:58:38 pm »
No idea about those specific courses.

 "Completed" doesn't mean anything to me. It might just mean you turned up every day, and didn't drool over the keyboard.

I would be interested in how the courses had changed your understanding. That would give an indirect indication of what you didn't know and how you learned to improve. I would push your understanding to find out what you know you don't know.

What matters to me was what you achieved, and what you have done beyond the normal requirements. I would like seeing you set realistic goals that stretch you, what/why you did/didn't complete, and what you would do differently next time.

Here are links to the first two courses for example:
https://www.udemy.com/course/arm-assembly-programming/
https://www.udemy.com/course/x86-assembly-programming-from-ground-uptm/

For the first course - I have experience in programming ARM-CortexM in C/C++ language, but it was interesting to me how C++ compilers generate assembly instructions from C++ code. I didn't know ARM assembly before this course, so ISA and assembly for ARM-CortexM4 have been a novelty for me. especially interesting for me was programming FPU in ARM assembly.
For the second course, I was familiar with the basics of X86/x64 CPU assembly, but I wasn't familiar with FPU,MMX instructions. SEE Extensions and Advanced Vector Extensions.
I studied very carefully the provided source code of many examples. As part of my own exercises after the course with ARM assembly, I implemented ln(x) (natural logarithm of given float number) using "Taylor series" - it was a similar example to sin(x) function implementation in the course. It would take some time to describe things I learned from these courses, but all of them were very interesting for me and I have fun studying them.

Best Regards
 

Offline YTusername

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Re: "udemy" IT technical courses - have an impact for perception of employee?
« Reply #3 on: December 27, 2023, 06:11:23 am »
Certificates especially from Udemy don't have any real value in recruitment. It is very easy to get it by only watching the videos. Certificates from respectable institutes or platforms may have a better influence on recruitment (unfortunately the price will be high in return). However, you can use it as a bonus point not as a major thing to get the Job. For example, getting a certificate from FEDEVEL may have more value than attending a PCB course on Udemy. Getting a certificate from Udacity about autonomous driving is better than attending something relevant on Udemy. I consider Udemy something useful to educate/train yourself with proof, but it is for yourself by the end of the day. 
 
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Offline FlyingDutchTopic starter

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Re: "udemy" IT technical courses - have an impact for perception of employee?
« Reply #4 on: December 27, 2023, 07:36:22 am »
Certificates especially from Udemy don't have any real value in recruitment. It is very easy to get it by only watching the videos. Certificates from respectable institutes or platforms may have a better influence on recruitment (unfortunately the price will be high in return). However, you can use it as a bonus point not as a major thing to get the Job. For example, getting a certificate from FEDEVEL may have more value than attending a PCB course on Udemy. Getting a certificate from Udacity about autonomous driving is better than attending something relevant on Udemy. I consider Udemy something useful to educate/train yourself with proof, but it is for yourself by the end of the day.
Hello,

thanks for your answer. It is as I thought that these courses have no meaning.

Best Regards
 

Offline VRomanov

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Re: "udemy" IT technical courses - have an impact for perception of employee?
« Reply #5 on: February 24, 2024, 02:12:37 am »
I've hired control systems engineers and plc programmers in the past. Here's my perspective:
- The courses indicate interest in a topic and some willingness to learn. They're definitely not a negative and something to talk about at an interview.
- My opinion is that most of those that sign up for those classes rarely finish them. I'd definitely ask a few questions to find out what your level of knowledge is if it's relevent to the job.
- Outside of that, I don't believe it puts you that much ahead of other applicants.
- Personally, I like to see some "extra" materials besides college, but don't expect that from many; I'd guess that most hiring managers over 40 won't even know what udemy is.

Hope that makes sense...
 


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