Electronics > KiCad

New symbol

<< < (4/5) > >>

jpanhalt:
Yes, by package, I was referring mostly to the footprint and secondarily to the 2D outline.  In Eagle, package and symbol are separate files that are then associated when making a "device."   Quite a while ago, there was a post here in which it was pointed out that KiCad libraries had a different structure that more closely associated symbols and packages in the same file. (https://www.eevblog.com/forum/kicad/eagle-to-kicad/msg3032444/#msg3032444)

Hence, my caution.  I haven't switched to KiCad (yet), but I do prefer having separate package and symbol libraries.

retiredfeline:
I think the documents you read indicate that compliant fully specified library symbols should have an associated footprint. However this can always be overridden in the project, so yes, symbols and footprints are separate concepts. As you would expect; tons of chips use the various DIP and SOP packages, and an IC may come in various packages.

Doctorandus_P:
I am confused by the difficulties that people apparently encounter here.

It starts with the original question about a triode (whatever that is).

In Eeschema (KiCad's schematic editor), just press "a" for add and then start typing "triode" in the search box.

The link that jpanhalt posted about making a symbol in KiCad should suffice in that area. I do recommend to start with a copy of an existing triode and then modifying it to your own insights.
Starting with an example shows you already what it looks like, and it keeps the form of the symbol in line with the other library symbols.

Creating and managing schematic symbols (ditto for footprints) is quite easy in KiCad. If people perceive it as "more difficult than in eagle" then it very likely is because they have years of experience in that other program and have forgotten about the learning curve in that program, and have to learn it again in KiCad because it works a bit "differently".

I switched to Linux some 6 to 8 years ago and for this I needed a Schematic + PCB program that works with Linux. I tried Eagle back then (and about 6 others) but I found it an annoying program to work with. I wanted to add a 0.2 Ohm resistor to a schematic, and Eagle would not let me do that.

Then I looked further and found KiCad. The way that KiCad works fits better with the way my brain works. Back then it had quite a bit of rough edges and some things (such as library management) did not work properly, but KiCad has made leaps of progress since then.


Karel:

--- Quote from: Doctorandus_P on November 09, 2021, 11:04:44 am ---Creating and managing schematic symbols (ditto for footprints) is quite easy in KiCad. If people perceive it as "more difficult than in eagle" then it very likely is because they have years of experience in that other program and have forgotten about the learning curve in that program, and have to learn it again in KiCad because it works a bit "differently".

--- End quote ---

In KiCad V5 there’s no ‘E’ (edit) command in the symbol editor for circles and polygons.
The only way to change the size of a circle is to delete it, set the grid to an appropriate size and try again.

Creating polygons with curved lines in a footprint is a breeze in Eagle. It's not possible in KiCad V5.
One of the more experienced people on the KiCad forums wrote "KiCad’s drawing capabilities are quite limited. It’s not a mechanical CAD program."
when I was asking how to create a certain footprint.

jpanhalt:
Neither is Eagle ver. 7.xx a decent mechanical CAD program.  When it is a matter of creating something complex (e.g., a PCB outline), I revert to a conventional mechanical CAD and import it as DXF.   That is easily aligned with the origin.  Then you are done.  I did not intend to draw this conversation into a comparison of the two programs.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

[*] Previous page

There was an error while thanking
Thanking...
Go to full version