Electronics > Manufacturing & Assembly

Homemade pick-and-place from old scanner

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matseng:
This homemade pick-and-place must have the best complexity vs usability ratio I've seen so far.  A scavenged scanner plus parts from an old printer and hey presto! - a fully usable machine that takes care of all those pesky discretes...  I love it.

https://youtu.be/i0ZT4y3DYrY?t=2m52s


rx8pilot:
Its a clever use of old stuff. I love the comment...."This is the future of production"

(3) 8mm tapes and dreadfully slow, I would much rather hand build the PCB's.

sleemanj:

--- Quote from: rx8pilot on January 25, 2016, 04:48:38 am ---Its a clever use of old stuff. I love the comment...."This is the future of production"

(3) 8mm tapes and dreadfully slow, I would much rather hand build the PCB's.

--- End quote ---

Speed doesn't really matter if you just set it going and go do something else.

matseng:
For being a cheapass contraption cobbled up of random parts I think it does a marvellous job. Much easier to build than Redfrog for instance and also about the same speed.   Of course is doesn't even compare to one of the Neoden $5-10K machines, or yours $50K(?) machine.

I don't see the 8mm tapes as a big obstacle since that what's the discretes are using, it would be nice to have a few more rows of them though...

Think I rather use a slow machine like this instead of manually placing 50-100 parts on two dozens of boards. I've done that a couple of times and my old eyes & back really doesn't like that. So for me - better slow than hurt.

But I think it's time for me to invest in a TM220, I've got a project where I need to populate 200 boards with about 700 pieces of 0603's and sot23's each.  Having a PCBA in China do that for me would cost between 50 and 75% of a TM, so it almost makes economical sense at the first run.  Maybe there will be TM220's on the second hand market soon with all the new bigger/faster/better machines coming out.

rx8pilot:
I just recently got my P&P up to full speed. For a while I was doing part of my PCB's in the P&P and part of it by hand for parts that could not go into the machine. It was great to get familiar with the P&P but ultimately, it was really a challenge to have a split process. The P&P was only faster than hand assembly once I got all the feeders and was able to do the whole PCB in one shot. Organizing and designing the assembly process from end-to-end consumed a lot of time.

My eyes really opened up when I got a machine - a full commercial system. The planning, setup, programming, alignment, fiddling, etc is not trivial. I had spent the last two years manually assembling PCBs and was hoping that P&P would be a white knight coming to save the day. Not so fast. It is really a serious challenge if you are hoping to make money. For a hobby, TM220/TM240 seem awesome and fun - but not really something you could hand a biz on. A little project like this one that can put a few passives down at a time is cool, fun, and interesting as a project - just not particularly useful in the end.

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