Electronics > Manufacturing & Assembly

Oven for baking compoentents?

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c64:
Is it possible to use vacuum instead of baking?

Psi:
You could also consider if you really need to care about it at all.
Keep in mind the baking requirement is often just there to maximize yield at super large volumes. At ultra small volume like 100pcs it may not make any noticeable difference.

Or, maybe the parts actually are super sensitive to moisture and 50% could popcorn off the PCB without baking, or maybe have a high failure rate later on.  But normally if they are this bad there will be a very clear warning about it in the datasheet. Rather than just a rating with nothing else said about it.

I'm not saying to ignore the rating, just saying. Make your on call, maybe after some testing.

Microdoser:

--- Quote from: Psi on October 03, 2023, 11:37:51 pm ---You could also consider if you really need to care about it at all.
Keep in mind the baking requirement is often just there to maximize yield at super large volumes. At ultra small volume like 100pcs it may not make any noticeable difference.

Or, maybe the parts actually are super sensitive to moisture and 50% could popcorn off the PCB without baking, or maybe have a high failure rate later on.  But normally if they are this bad there will be a very clear warning about it in the datasheet. Rather than just a rating with nothing else said about it.

I'm not saying to ignore the rating, just saying. Make your on call, maybe after some testing.

--- End quote ---

I use some parts that Digi-Key say are moisture sensitive and came in special moisture proof packaging with the little card that shows they weren't exposed to moisture, and had advice to bake before use, which I didn't do, and I had no issues with any of them. I test all my boards after construction and I would replace any non-functioning parts (none so far), and no parts have popcorned off the board during soldering. It's possible lifespan may have been affected, but I've had no failures in years of operation.
 
I'm also not saying to ignore the rating, just that I have the policy to see which parts it matters for in the real world and account for that retrospectively. Currently, it's none of the parts I use.
 
But back to your original question, if you really want to dry out components, just get a basic food dehydrator. You can get one for £30 from Amazon, set the temperature you want (usually 35c-70c), they are fairly small, won't heat up the whole house (maybe a small room will be 2 degrees warmer) and as a bonus, you can use it as a food dehydrator or 3D filament dryer.

Teledog:
Baking out?
At what temp/how long?
Plain oven, or kilns?
A desiccant is relatively easy, bag the components with the desiccant for a few days/ad infinitum.
And as far as desiccants go, I like to use 3A molecular sieve ("baked out" at @350F+ for a few hours).. cheap & reusable multiple times.
You'll know when it's properly dried by putting a single (cooled, room temp) granule on the tongue & listen to it sizzle & get hot! ;-P..

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