Electronics > Manufacturing & Assembly

PCBWay parts library?

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HwAoRrDk:

--- Quote from: jmelson on August 17, 2022, 04:53:57 pm ---UGH!  I just tried to find suitable parts on LCSC, their parametric search is pretty bad, and I found VERY little.

--- End quote ---

Oh, yes, it's absolutely atrocious in places. :D But it varies so much from category to category - some good, some bad.

The thing that really gets my goat is how a category might actually have useful parametric property lists, but a significant number of products aren't actually tagged with any attributes! So you search, come up with sod-all, thinking "wait, is that all?", but in reality the majority were excluded due to their lack of attributes.

Sometimes I just sort by stock and then browse to get a handle on what's popular, then filter by keyword (ironically, often the descriptions contain info that could have been added as parametric attributes).

Psi:
Normally you use LCSC because they are 1/3 the price, not because they have a nice website  :-DD

Ya just have to be careful because the likelihood of getting bad chips is higher on LCSC.
So I try to avoid getting anything from LCSC that is mission critical to the pcb.

grandaspanna:
I've had good experience with PCBWay in at least three different scenarios:

* They've sourced all the parts based on my BoM
* I've sent them unique parts that they were unable to source
* I've had parts shipped directly to them from a supplier
The only quibble I've ever had is not getting the quantity break pricing where I've spec'd 1000+ of a single component, but at the end of the day, it's a few cents per board.

The related issue is designing stuff and then being unable to source the components you want. Drives me nuts.

MarkR42:
I have only used the fully "turnkey" on PCBWay.

But when using assemblers who are not JLCPCB, usually you will send a BOM, and specify all required information to get the right part. If you aren't fussy (e.g. it's a 33k pullup resistor) then just put the important info.

Then they will give you a list of the parts that they can source / have selected, with pricing, and ask if it's ok. If they substituted something that you didn't want, then you can suggest a different alternative, etc. If something is much too expensive, you can ask them for a better price or to suggest an alternative, or suggest one yourself.

I have found that they mostly quoted reasonable prices on standard component, but if you're using a hard-to-get component, they might be quoting from a scalper ($5 for a $1 part? or worse?).

 

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