Electronics > Manufacturing & Assembly

Self-Laminating Two FPC halves?

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envisionelec:
I have a research project wherein I need to place an array of components between two layers of flexible PCB (FPCB). The components, which are piezo ceramics, will be glued with a Henkel conductive epoxy (TBD, but likely an Eccobond). What is involved in the laminating process on a DIY scale for proof of concept? I obviously don't want to crush the ceramics. I think I might have painted myself into a corner... :clap:

It seems I would need a custom plate to avoid crushing my components - or very careful ironing.  Anyone have experience with such a thing?

scientist:
Why bother with flex PCBs if you're going to laminate the halves together? It's not going to be rigid, and it's not going to be anywhere near as flexible as a single board. 

SeanB:
If you are going to laminate you will need a press as large as the complete board, and with a platen top and bottom lined with a soft silicone rubber and with some PTFE sheet ( or other non stick plastic that your particular epoxy will not bond to) to apply a firm pressure while the epoxy cures. You assemble the components and align within the work time and then carefully press together.

envisionelec:

--- Quote from: SeanB on May 08, 2014, 04:55:31 pm ---If you are going to laminate you will need a press as large as the complete board, and with a platen top and bottom lined with a soft silicone rubber and with some PTFE sheet ( or other non stick plastic that your particular epoxy will not bond to) to apply a firm pressure while the epoxy cures. You assemble the components and align within the work time and then carefully press together.

--- End quote ---

Thank you. I have a press for doing LCD flex and anisotropic epoxy. This assembly is larger, but not by much. I have decided that the custom platen is the way to go.

envisionelec:

--- Quote from: scientist on May 08, 2014, 03:10:36 pm ---Why bother with flex PCBs if you're going to laminate the halves together? It's not going to be rigid, and it's not going to be anywhere near as flexible as a single board.

--- End quote ---

The application demands an FPCB.

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