Author Topic: Which material for shieldings?  (Read 2448 times)

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Online Aldo22Topic starter

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Which material for shieldings?
« on: September 02, 2023, 08:36:38 am »
I am not sure if this is the right forum category.

I am looking for a material/sheet for shielding etc. which should be easily cuttable and to some degree formable (edges).
About the type that is used for these simple shields, e.g. in the NanoVNA (picture).
Is this aluminum or steel?

How thick should it be? I can't measure the ones I have, unfortunately.
Would something like this work (aluminum)?
Or steel?

Am grateful for advice.
Thank you!


 

Offline Gyro

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Re: Which material for shieldings?
« Reply #1 on: September 02, 2023, 08:41:19 am »
It's Tin plated steel. It offers reasonable corrosion protection and good solderability. The traditional source is old food cans [Edit: hence the name 'Tin can']
« Last Edit: September 02, 2023, 08:43:51 am by Gyro »
Best Regards, Chris
 

Online Aldo22Topic starter

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Re: Which material for shieldings?
« Reply #2 on: September 02, 2023, 09:11:31 am »
It's Tin plated steel. It offers reasonable corrosion protection and good solderability. The traditional source is old food cans [Edit: hence the name 'Tin can']
Thank you!
Would that be something like that?
https://www.aliexpress.com/item/1005004729698466.html
What thickness is still workable with scissors or knife?
Is 0.2mm already too thick?


 

Offline Gyro

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Re: Which material for shieldings?
« Reply #3 on: September 02, 2023, 09:18:46 am »
Good question, I would think the thinner the better for scissors, the traditional tool is 'Tin Snips' (that name again), which are like really heavy scissors. If you're just prototyping / home project then thin brass or copper sheet is also useable, softer, and available from craft stores etc.
Best Regards, Chris
 
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Offline PartialDischarge

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Re: Which material for shieldings?
« Reply #4 on: September 02, 2023, 09:52:38 am »
There are proto kits to make you own shielding cans. I've seen this one but there may be others.

https://www.mouser.es/new/harwin/harwin-emc-can-dev-kit/

 
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Online Andreas

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Re: Which material for shieldings?
« Reply #5 on: September 02, 2023, 10:22:03 am »
Hello,

I would etch (like a PCB) (instead of cutting) a shield.
There are photosensitive brass sheets (0.3 mm) available see link here:

https://www.eevblog.com/forum/projects/source-for-rf-sheilding-cans/msg3788141/#msg3788141

Tinning can be done with a chemical bath.
https://www.seno.de/seno-3211-glanzzinn

with best regards

Andreas
 

Online Kean

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Re: Which material for shieldings?
« Reply #6 on: September 02, 2023, 10:23:30 am »
K&S Metals are a supplier to hobby stores that has mixed packets of sheet metal including tin.  The hobby stores also sell little sheet bending tools typically used for making scale models.
https://ksmetals.com/collections/tin-coated-sheet

I've used their brass, copper, and tin for various projects like RF shields and are solderable.
Thickness shouldn't be too critical, but obviously the thinner stuff can be more easily cut or bent but also deformed unintentionally.
 

Offline KaneTW

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Re: Which material for shieldings?
« Reply #7 on: September 02, 2023, 11:00:52 am »
 

Offline geggi1

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Re: Which material for shieldings?
« Reply #8 on: September 02, 2023, 11:17:44 am »
0,2/0,3mm copper sheets is simple to work with and not to hard to get.
 
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Online Aldo22Topic starter

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Re: Which material for shieldings?
« Reply #9 on: September 02, 2023, 11:34:57 am »
Thanks for all the responses. :-+
Actually, I am only interested in the basic material, less in ready-made solutions.

0,2/0,3mm copper sheets is simple to work with and not to hard to get.

Yes, this could be the solution. For example this?
https://www.aliexpress.com/item/1005004330910399.html

There are also very thin steel sheets:
https://www.aliexpress.com/item/1005004451000362.html

I just do not know how they behave.
Whether they stay in the shape you give them or are so elastic that they flatten out again and again?
 

Online coppercone2

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Re: Which material for shieldings?
« Reply #10 on: September 02, 2023, 11:46:01 am »
bungard sounds like a excellent name for underware
 

Offline Karel

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Re: Which material for shieldings?
« Reply #11 on: September 02, 2023, 12:15:36 pm »
We used nickel-silver for shielding because it's easy to handle and easy to solder.

https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Nickel_silver&useskin=vector

 
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Online Aldo22Topic starter

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Re: Which material for shieldings?
« Reply #12 on: September 02, 2023, 02:46:15 pm »
Thank you all for your support!
I have ordered this:
https://www.aliexpress.com/item/1005004330910399.html
Thickness 0.2mm, Width 80mm
 

Online Aldo22Topic starter

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Re: Which material for shieldings?
« Reply #13 on: September 19, 2023, 09:14:15 am »
0,2/0,3mm copper sheets is simple to work with and not to hard to get.

Thanks again for the advice.
This is exactly what I was looking for.
You can cut it with household scissors, it keeps the shape you give it and it's sturdy enough.
It's probably easy to solder as well.
 


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