Author Topic: Wearable magnifying glasses for soldering?  (Read 1149 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline e100

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 323
Wearable magnifying glasses for soldering?
« on: September 12, 2019, 08:07:51 am »
I'm getting older and wear glasses for reading and distance. Todays fine pitch devices are a real challenge even to do a visual inspection, let alone soldering.
I've used a desk magnifying glass but that isn't very mobile.

What are people's experiences with the wearable magnifying glasses that are typically advertised for jeweler/watch repair applications? There appear to be a range of designs. What features are important. I need something that still allows me to wear my glasses underneath.
 
The following users thanked this post: xhale

Offline pisoiu

  • Regular Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 78
  • Country: ro
 

Offline e100

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 323
Re: Wearable magnifying glasses for soldering?
« Reply #2 on: September 12, 2019, 11:36:48 am »
I use something like this:
https://www.aliexpress.com/item/33003148364.html?spm=a2g0o.productlist.0.0.5888270bO0m2LQ&algo_pvid=89483409-0381-48e1-a1c1-edb826f8ec71&algo_expid=89483409-0381-48e1-a1c1-edb826f8ec71-0&btsid=92d30a84-4d0b-444a-83e2-bac9e4a9eb2d&ws_ab_test=searchweb0_0,searchweb201602_1,searchweb201603_53
They're ok from optical point of view but cheaper versions have some mechanical problems which makes initial adjusting a bit more difficult.

How heavy are these?
I see there is a clip on version for normal glasses. Is that what you have?
 

Offline DTJ

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 873
  • Country: au
Re: Wearable magnifying glasses for soldering?
« Reply #3 on: September 12, 2019, 12:47:19 pm »
I bought some magnifying dental spectacles. They are reasonable quality and create a good image. I think they cost me about $60.

I could not use them for soldering or even inspection work. I think it is because a small movement of your head results in visual feedback that my brain cannot process. I found I could not get the positioning of the soldering iron or solder right either.


I ended up buying a Amscope binocular zoom microscope. It was a great decision.

I got one with a continuously adjustable zoom (7 x t0 40x from memory). I use it for all soldering and inspection as well as lots of other tasks.
I'd be lost without it. With a 0.5x barlow lens fitted I have about 130mm of working space under the lens and a good wide viewing field.

Try to get one secondhand off your gumtree or classified website.
 
The following users thanked this post: Psi, SMTech

Offline SMTech

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 290
  • Country: gb
Re: Wearable magnifying glasses for soldering?
« Reply #4 on: September 12, 2019, 12:51:35 pm »
I once gave the more basic visor style types ago, but I think they just introduce a new problem, now you can see but eye strain will increase and it also takes a while get used to using them as they are messing with your DOF etc. A better but more expensive solution is to use a digital microscope/inspection camera with a decent refresh rate, there's a whole bunch of them on aliexpress with Sony sensors and some decent lenses that cost a fair bit less than something like a Tagarno
 

Offline Psi

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 7346
  • Country: nz
Re: Wearable magnifying glasses for soldering?
« Reply #5 on: September 12, 2019, 12:52:16 pm »
+1 for stereo microscope and 0.5 barlow lens
https://www.aliexpress.com/item/32661218238.html
i've used LuckyZoom before, they're a good aliexpress seller

When you say mobile, how mobile does it need to be?
You can pickup and move a microscope around more than a desk magnifying lamp that's fixed to the table.

« Last Edit: September 12, 2019, 01:01:32 pm by Psi »
Greek letter 'Psi' (not Pounds per Square Inch)
 

Offline amspire

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 3783
  • Country: au
Re: Wearable magnifying glasses for soldering?
« Reply #6 on: September 12, 2019, 01:06:55 pm »
+1 for stereo microscope and 0.5 barlow lens
https://www.aliexpress.com/item/32661218238.html

(ive used LuckyZoom before, they are a good aliexpress seller)
My microscope is a Lucky Zoom one and it is really excellent. Very clear, and when set up right, the focus remains sharp over the zoom range.

The stand in this sale is not quite high enough for my liking, and a big part of the costs of bigger stands is the shipping weight.

A longer tube for the focusing arm is not expensive. You can get a longer tube and mount it on a wooden base. When you want the microscope to overhang something, rotate the base to the rear of the microscope and put a weight on it.
 

Offline amspire

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 3783
  • Country: au
Re: Wearable magnifying glasses for soldering?
« Reply #7 on: September 12, 2019, 01:10:39 pm »
When you say mobile, how mobile does it need to be?
You can pickup and move a microscope around more than a desk magnifying lamp that's fixed to the table.
Exactly what I do. You can pick up this kind of stand with one hand very easily.  I do not like the massive microscope stands.
 

Offline Martin Hodge

  • Supporter
  • ****
  • Posts: 34
  • Country: us
    • MGH Designs
Re: Wearable magnifying glasses for soldering?
« Reply #8 on: September 12, 2019, 01:12:58 pm »
You want the OptiVISOR. It goes on over your glasses, doesn't attach to them.

 

Offline pisoiu

  • Regular Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 78
  • Country: ro
Re: Wearable magnifying glasses for soldering?
« Reply #9 on: September 12, 2019, 01:17:42 pm »
How heavy are these?
I see there is a clip on version for normal glasses. Is that what you have?

A bit heavy but if you don't use them all day long, that's not a problem (at least for me). Also, they may slip a bit from time to time due to head movements, sweating, etc. Mine came exactly as in the pictures, with plastic frames and lenses, not attachable to existing glasses.
As stated somewhere above, you need to get used to them, a small head movement translates into huge fov movement. Besides steady hands you also need steady neck :)
 

Offline asmi

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 810
  • Country: ca
Re: Wearable magnifying glasses for soldering?
« Reply #10 on: September 12, 2019, 01:20:04 pm »
I tried several different head-mounted magnifiers, but they all were not very practical as they limit the depth of view, and so I had to raise and lower them all the time. Stereo microscope is the ultimate tool for me now - it's good for placing even super-tiny 0201 parts, and at the same time it's great for post-reflow and post-soldering inspection (as I can easily change magnification by changing eyepieces from x10 to x20), and it's relatively cheap (150 USD + shipping).
 

Offline nigelwright7557

  • Regular Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 126
  • Country: gb
    • Murton-Pike Systems
Re: Wearable magnifying glasses for soldering?
« Reply #11 on: September 12, 2019, 01:21:56 pm »
I use 2.5 mag reading glasses for basic viewing.
For getting up real close just a hand held 10x magnifier.
PCBCAD51 PCB design software https://www.murtonpikesystems.co.uk
 

Offline SMTech

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 290
  • Country: gb
Re: Wearable magnifying glasses for soldering?
« Reply #12 on: September 12, 2019, 02:34:04 pm »
That is the simplest option isn't it, cheap and nasty clip on illuminated magnifier, popular with "crafting" cross stitch types.
 

Offline thinkfat

  • Supporter
  • ****
  • Posts: 358
  • Country: de
    • Matthias' Hackerst├╝bchen
Re: Wearable magnifying glasses for soldering?
« Reply #13 on: September 12, 2019, 02:35:57 pm »
I use 2.5 mag reading glasses for basic viewing.
For getting up real close just a hand held 10x magnifier.
Yep, the kind you get at the drugstore for cheap works just fine for soldering. For really fine work I use a stereo microscope. But for basic soldering, reading glasses are just fine.

Gesendet von meinem Nokia 6.1 mit Tapatalk

 

Offline e100

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 323
Re: Wearable magnifying glasses for soldering?
« Reply #14 on: September 12, 2019, 02:54:26 pm »
I have a stereo microscope that is collecting dust. It has 10x eyepieces and 2x objective but the field of view is so narrow that you spend half the time trying to figure out where the soldering iron is. I bought a pair of 5x eyepieces thinking that would solve the problem, so yes the magnification was less, but the field of view was also less!  |O
I didn't know about reduction barlow lenses until they were mentioned in this thread.
 

Offline e100

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 323
Re: Wearable magnifying glasses for soldering?
« Reply #15 on: September 12, 2019, 03:02:35 pm »
I bought some magnifying dental spectacles. They are reasonable quality and create a good image. I think they cost me about $60.

I could not use them for soldering or even inspection work. I think it is because a small movement of your head results in visual feedback that my brain cannot process. I found I could not get the positioning of the soldering iron or solder right either.


I ended up buying a Amscope binocular zoom microscope. It was a great decision.

I got one with a continuously adjustable zoom (7 x t0 40x from memory). I use it for all soldering and inspection as well as lots of other tasks.
I'd be lost without it. With a 0.5x barlow lens fitted I have about 130mm of working space under the lens and a good wide viewing field.

Try to get one secondhand off your gumtree or classified website.

Yes, I've used a zoom microscope in the past. It makes it so much easier to navigate around a large board, see the relative position of the soldering iron and have everything in focus. Once you're in the right location you can zoom in to do the actual soldering.
 

Offline rea5245

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 370
  • Country: us
Re: Wearable magnifying glasses for soldering?
« Reply #16 on: September 12, 2019, 03:08:53 pm »
I got one with a continuously adjustable zoom (7 x t0 40x from memory). I use it for all soldering and inspection as well as lots of other tasks.
I'd be lost without it. With a 0.5x barlow lens fitted I have about 130mm of working space under the lens and a good wide viewing field.

Since it's a binocular scope, don't you need two barlow lenses?

There are zoom scopes starting at 3.5x available. Would that eliminate the need for barlows?

- Bob
 

Offline amspire

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 3783
  • Country: au
Re: Wearable magnifying glasses for soldering?
« Reply #17 on: September 12, 2019, 03:23:04 pm »
Since it's a binocular scope, don't you need two barlow lenses?
- Bob
No. It is just a single large diameter barlow lens just below the two stereo objective lenses.
 

Offline jfiresto

  • Regular Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 134
  • Country: de
Re: Wearable magnifying glasses for soldering?
« Reply #18 on: September 12, 2019, 03:33:07 pm »
... Since it's a binocular scope, don't you need two barlow lenses?...

One is enough, even on the Greenough-design microscopes you are probably thinking of. You just make the "barlow" lens large enough so that both optical paths pass through the lens: one left of center, the other right of center.

The other type of stereo microscope does that even higher up the microscope. It has a single, large main objective and passes both the left and right optical paths through it. Such "Common Main Objective" (CMO) microscopes can give brighter, sharper images and are more flexible, but suffer greater lateral chromatic aberration (color fringing) because the paths pass through the less well corrected sides of the lens. CMO microscopes are also more expensive.
 

Offline nigelwright7557

  • Regular Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 126
  • Country: gb
    • Murton-Pike Systems
Re: Wearable magnifying glasses for soldering?
« Reply #19 on: September 26, 2019, 08:13:45 pm »
I use 2.5 mag reading glasses for basic viewing.
For getting up real close just a hand held 10x magnifier.
Yep, the kind you get at the drugstore for cheap works just fine for soldering. For really fine work I use a stereo microscope. But for basic soldering, reading glasses are just fine.

Gesendet von meinem Nokia 6.1 mit Tapatalk

Its the fine SMD 0.5mm micro's I have trouble with.
Even if it looks good under magnifier there can sometimes be a short behind a pin.
What I do is when I design the pcb is put a row of vias next to the micro so I can buzz between adjacent pins.
Spent half an hour trying to remove a short on an A2D converter only to find they were connected on pcb anyway ! doh !
For fine scale SMD I stick it down with solder paste first to help stop  it floating around.
I then solder tack it and check it hasn't moved.
Then apply big blob of solder to iron tip and slowly run it along pins making sure every one gets solder.
Quite often there are blobs of solder so I remove them with copper braid.
A final buzz with the DMM and all is well.




PCBCAD51 PCB design software https://www.murtonpikesystems.co.uk
 

Offline NorthGuy

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 1805
  • Country: ca
Re: Wearable magnifying glasses for soldering?
« Reply #20 on: September 27, 2019, 01:49:49 pm »
+6 reading glasses still work for me when soldering (compare to my normal +2 for reading). You just need to remember to take them off once you're done, or you may get disoriented. For some reason, they don't sell them in Canada (+3.5 is the best I could find). I had to order mine from eBay.
 

Online tggzzz

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 10086
  • Country: gb
    • Having fun doing more, with less
Re: Wearable magnifying glasses for soldering?
« Reply #21 on: September 27, 2019, 02:28:52 pm »
I'm getting older and wear glasses for reading and distance. Todays fine pitch devices are a real challenge even to do a visual inspection, let alone soldering.
I've used a desk magnifying glass but that isn't very mobile.

What are people's experiences with the wearable magnifying glasses that are typically advertised for jeweler/watch repair applications? There appear to be a range of designs. What features are important. I need something that still allows me to wear my glasses underneath.

A solution that works for one person may not work for another; it is highly personal. That suggests starting with flexible simple cheap solutions.

With one exception, I find stereo microscopes impossible to use, even though I've been taking stereoscopic pictures for 35 years. There's the added complexity of ensuring nothing gets deposited on the lens.

My preferred solution is a cheap head-mounted visor with multiple lenses. They aren't heavy, can be used with spectacles, can be used for other things (e.g. peering into equipment), have 1.2/1.8/2.5/3.5 magnification lenses and you can put two lenses "in series". The LED is not much use.

Example, but they are widely available under different brands: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Rolson-60390-Loupe-Magnifier-Visor/dp/B001MJ0JW2
There are lies, damned lies, statistics - and ADC/DAC specs.
Glider pilot's aphorism: "there is no substitute for span". Retort: "There is a substitute: skill+imagination. But you can buy span".
Having fun doing more, with less
 

Offline asmi

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 810
  • Country: ca
Re: Wearable magnifying glasses for soldering?
« Reply #22 on: September 27, 2019, 05:08:51 pm »
With one exception, I find stereo microscopes impossible to use, even though I've been taking stereoscopic pictures for 35 years. There's the added complexity of ensuring nothing gets deposited on the lens.
AmScope SE400 microscope has a working distance of over 200 mm! This is more than enough for just about any work I can think of. Infact this was too much for me, so I had to return it and get SE410 instead with lower distance of about 150 mm.
 

Offline jmelson

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 1265
  • Country: us
Re: Wearable magnifying glasses for soldering?
« Reply #23 on: September 27, 2019, 07:53:41 pm »
I have a stereo microscope that is collecting dust. It has 10x eyepieces and 2x objective but the field of view is so narrow that you spend half the time trying to figure out where the soldering iron is. I bought a pair of 5x eyepieces thinking that would solve the problem, so yes the magnification was less, but the field of view was also less!  |O
I didn't know about reduction barlow lenses until they were mentioned in this thread.
Well, they are all different.  But, I have used 3 different stereo zoom microscopes, and they all had a decent field of view.  One trick is to use them without eyeglasses, if you normally use them.  Getting your eyes closer to the eyepieces expands the field of view a lot.  The biggest requirement, though, is "working distance".  If the distance from objective lens to object is 20 mm, there's NO WAY you can do soldering with it.  Inspection, yes, but soldering no.  The units I've used all have something around 100 mm working distance or better.  That is enough room to get your hands and a soldering iron under it.

As for the soldering iron, you need to know where it is by feel, to avoid burns.  This is something you learn by experience, to know if you hold your hand like THIS, then you KNOW the iron will be THERE.  it develops over time.

Jon
 

Offline ivaylo

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 588
  • Country: us
Re: Wearable magnifying glasses for soldering?
« Reply #24 on: September 28, 2019, 06:34:57 am »
I use something like this:
https://www.aliexpress.com/item/33003148364.html?spm=a2g0o.productlist.0.0.5888270bO0m2LQ&algo_pvid=89483409-0381-48e1-a1c1-edb826f8ec71&algo_expid=89483409-0381-48e1-a1c1-edb826f8ec71-0&btsid=92d30a84-4d0b-444a-83e2-bac9e4a9eb2d&ws_ab_test=searchweb0_0,searchweb201602_1,searchweb201603_53
They're ok from optical point of view but cheaper versions have some mechanical problems which makes initial adjusting a bit more difficult.
These work. Mine were made out of some weird plastic though which disintegrated in the course of 12 months or so. First started cracking, then broke in smaller and smaller pieces. Probably a bad batch and manufacturing fixed long time since, but am hesitant to buy the cheap ones again.
 


Share me

Digg  Facebook  SlashDot  Delicious  Technorati  Twitter  Google  Yahoo
Smf