Off Topic Hobbies > Mechanical Engineering

Advice needed on replacing rotted out corrugated garage for use as a workshop

<< < (3/3)

Johnny B Good:
 For any heavy stuff, I'm thinking using something like free standing dexion shelving units. For lighter weight items like electronic components, I'd be inclined to glue MDF panels to the walls with "No More Nails" and screw inter-lockable plastic storage boxes onto the panels. Ditto for any tool racks and such.

 I'd prefer not to drill into any of the concrete panels at all and I'd rather use existing bolts in the support posts than drill into them to attach any hangings such as MDF panels. Drilling into the panels or posts risks exposing the reinforcing mesh/rods to the air which is best avoided to save any future problems with rust.

 It might also be possible to hook support hangers over the tops of the concrete wall panels, avoiding any need to drill into them. In this case gluing the lower parts of any MDF panels hung off those hangers will help fix them in position.

 There are many ways to skin this particular cat whichever way I go and I'll worry about the shelving issue once the garage/workshop has been built (or erected).

 Whatever way I go, I still need a good strong concrete base to build on, along with a couple of 80mm ducts back to the house for electrical and comms service cabling. This should give me plenty of room in the comms cable duct to run an MDPE line for mains water supply if the need ever arises.

 Unfortunately, the ducts have got to get past a water drain pipe or two so moling them in is maybe not a good idea meaning the route will probably have to be trenched... very carefully. However, I'll leave that decision to the experts - moling might be a viable option after all despite my own misgivings.

dunkemhigh:
[attach=2]My office is wooden so nothing is supported by the walls - all my shelves and desks are freestanding, but most are attached to the walls for stability. It works well, but the downside is that you can't have overhanging things because of the support legs. Actually, that's not quite correct - I use a panel to support an overhead monitor, which is fixed to adjacent studs.
[attach=1]

I would be unhappy to use No More Nails for something like this (even ignoring that this isn't concrete but has a peelable surface). Just prefer an actual physical restraint to magic :). Hangers might work, though. I would be inclined to use those as backstop for the glue rather than standalone, but I ain't a builder.


--- Quote ---I still need a good strong concrete base to build on
--- End quote ---

When we had ours laid it was, of course, for a car garage, so it was laid rough. I've always regretted not thinking more about it and insisting it was smooth. OTOH, we did specify an inspection pit and although we get a car in there now, it's come in dead useful as cold long-term storage...

gtm:

--- Quote from: Johnny B Good on June 24, 2021, 12:07:20 am ---other issues of interest are in regard of planning permission


--- End quote ---
If it was me I would look into the technicalities of that.
I lived in London for 20 years, and I knew a guy who was forced to to tear down is shed because he didn't have planning permission.
It wasn't a normal shed though, in terms of height it was normal,but it was made of thick wood planks, with a nice roof, plasterboard inside, toilet, electricity... It was basically a spare room.
He had it for 10-15 years, until the Council noticed and then there were several court cases over a few years , in the end the Council won.
This was Lambeth Council in South London.
Iirc, if if it can be considered "permanent" construction,  then you need planning permission. Or something like that.

Of course you could always save your rotted out corrugated sheets, and use them as camouflage for your new workshop

Johnny B Good:

--- Quote from: gtm on June 24, 2021, 10:11:35 am ---
--- Quote from: Johnny B Good on June 24, 2021, 12:07:20 am ---other issues of interest are in regard of planning permission


--- End quote ---
If it was me I would look into the technicalities of that.
I lived in London for 20 years, and I knew a guy who was forced to to tear down is shed because he didn't have planning permission.
It wasn't a normal shed though, in terms of height it was normal,but it was made of thick wood planks, with a nice roof, plasterboard inside, toilet, electricity... It was basically a spare room.
He had it for 10-15 years, until the Council noticed and then there were several court cases over a few years , in the end the Council won.
This was Lambeth Council in South London.
Iirc, if if it can be considered "permanent" construction,  then you need planning permission. Or something like that.

Of course you could always save your rotted out corrugated sheets, and use them as camouflage for your new workshop

--- End quote ---

 I put up a free standing 27 foot lattice tower in our back garden some 35 years ago without any planning permission. I think it rather helped it to escape notice from any would be objectors by virtue of it being painted a dark drab green with a thirty foot conifer in the garden backing onto ours being less than ten feet away :)

 The seven year limitation on submission of objections has long since expired so there's no danger of being forced to dismantle it and, even though I no longer use for any radioham activities, it's staying put just in case we attract interest from a buyer (if and when we come to sell up) with an interest in radio (ham or SWL). It won't be too difficult to remove the top two nine foot sections to downgrade it to a very sturdy washing line support post should a potential buyer not fancy having such a feature in their back garden.

 This new garage/workshop is a virtually identically sized replacement for the eyesore of a wreck that had existed for quite some time even before we moved into the property. In any case, both the old and the new garage/workshops didn't/don't require explicit planning permission by virtue of conforming to the limits defined by "Permitted development rights".

 As for your suggestion to use the old corrugated iron sheets to disguise the upgrade, those have long since been consigned to the scrapyard where they rightfully belong  :)

 Radiohams use the "temporary erection" work around to neighbourly objections to such antenna towers by using a trailer mounted tower that can be erected to heights of thirty feet or more in a matter of minutes, relocating them to another part of their garden every other week or so to suppress accusations of it effectively being a permanent construction. Garages and outhouses are permanent constructions allowed by Permitted development rights so the issue of permanent versus temporary construction in these cases simply doesn't exist.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[*] Previous page

There was an error while thanking
Thanking...
Go to full version