Electronics > Mechanical & Automation Engineering

Book recommendations for beginner machinist

(1/5) > >>

TimNJ:
Hi everyone,

I'm back to make another ignorant post on the mechanical engineering sub-forum. >:D

Over the last few months, I've really gotten the itch to spend a lot of money start a hobby machine shop in my basement, but apart from watching a handful of machinists on Youtube and getting some of the lathe/mill lingo down, I am utterly clueless. I'm looking for some reference books, preferably with example projects that I could work through using a small lathe and/or mill. I am interested to learn basic technique with a little bit of hand-holding..

Older the book, the better, in my experience. Anyone have any favorites? I know Machinery's Handbook is a classic, but not sure how it stands as a "teaching book".

Thank you,
Tim

bdunham7:
Having owned and operated a specialty (engine) machine shop, I can tell you that in practice, the field consists of a lot of very specific solutions and very few general principles.  Ok, there are general principles of course, but you really don't want to be trying to figure things out from first principles.  Machinery's Handbook is filled with those specific solutions and I'd strongly recommend you get a copy in any case.

Also, the drill press is one of the most dangerous pieces of equipment in a typical machine shop.  You need one, but be careful!

Anything else specific, just ask.

TimNJ:

--- Quote from: bdunham7 on July 02, 2021, 04:18:42 pm ---Having owned and operated a specialty (engine) machine shop, I can tell you that in practice, the field consists of a lot of very specific solutions and very few general principles.  Ok, there are general principles of course, but you really don't want to be trying to figure things out from first principles.  Machinery's Handbook is filled with those specific solutions and I'd strongly recommend you get a copy in any case.

Also, the drill press is one of the most dangerous pieces of equipment in a typical machine shop.  You need one, but be careful!

Anything else specific, just ask.

--- End quote ---

Understood. Sounds like good advice. What I gather is that often first principles aren't enough to make anything interesting...similar to how you will struggle to make anything actually useful only knowing Ohm's Law, KCL/KVL etc. That said, I really am in the "Machinery 101" phase, although I've worked many times with a drill press throughout my youth, have some clue about fixturing, feeds/speeds, etc.

Some ideas include: cutting threads, cutting gears, knurling and making small custom enclosures for electronics projects (integrated PCB bosses, front-panel holes, etc.).

By the way, what about the drill press safety in particular? You mean to say that my dad letting me use one with no safety glasses when I was 10 years old was a bad idea?

jpanhalt:
I presume you are asking about manual machines.  The book on my shelves that I recommend is:

Machine Tool Operations
William J. Patton
Reston Publishing (Prentice-Hall) (1974)

One can also get introductory books from various tool manufacturers, such as Atlas (Manual of Lathe Operation and Machinists Tables, Clausing Corp., 1978).  There also seem to be a lot of books on manual machining from the WWII era.  Used books seem to be aplenty in used book stores and are generally quite cheap.  I suspect as old machinists die off, the family has no use for them. 

As already mentioned, Machinery's Handbook is also a valuable resource for tables, but don't get too hung up on details.  Many older machinists work by feel and sight for grinding cutters.

tpowell1830:

--- Quote from: TimNJ on July 02, 2021, 04:47:45 pm ---
--- Quote from: bdunham7 on July 02, 2021, 04:18:42 pm ---Having owned and operated a specialty (engine) machine shop, I can tell you that in practice, the field consists of a lot of very specific solutions and very few general principles.  Ok, there are general principles of course, but you really don't want to be trying to figure things out from first principles.  Machinery's Handbook is filled with those specific solutions and I'd strongly recommend you get a copy in any case.

Also, the drill press is one of the most dangerous pieces of equipment in a typical machine shop.  You need one, but be careful!

Anything else specific, just ask.

--- End quote ---

Understood. Sounds like good advice. What I gather is that often first principles aren't enough to make anything interesting...similar to how you will struggle to make anything actually useful only knowing Ohm's Law, KCL/KVL etc. That said, I really am in the "Machinery 101" phase, although I've worked many times with a drill press throughout my youth, have some clue about fixturing, feeds/speeds, etc.

Some ideas include: cutting threads, cutting gears, knurling and making small custom enclosures for electronics projects (integrated PCB bosses, front-panel holes, etc.).

By the way, what about the drill press safety in particular? You mean to say that my dad letting me use one with no safety glasses when I was 10 years old was a bad idea?

--- End quote ---

I was a machinist for 10 years, and my takeaway is that safety is priority one. I have personally seen tragedy multiple times because someone was a bit careless while operating some machine tool.

Safety glasses are the easiest and simplest PPM to use... please read and understand any safety guidelines for any equipment that you use. Also, spend some time to think through any operations that you attempt from a safety perspective. You don't want your family to find you wrapped around a lathe chuck. In most cases that I have tragically seen, carelessness was the number one cause for the accident.

Hope this helps...

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

There was an error while thanking
Thanking...
Go to full version