Electronics > Microcontrollers

Debugging ARM in Eclipse

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Harvs:
So after trailing a few IDEs, I ended up going the free approach with Eclipse, Sourcery G++ and OpenOCD.  All seems to work OK, albeit far from the ideal IDE experience (that's probably largely in part due to my lack of in-depth knowledge of Eclipse, and how to set up the seemly millions of options.)  But it's manageable enough.

So the debugging aspects work reasonably, and I found the memory monitor which I can monitor addresses.  However, it would be really nice not to have to work out 0x48000810 is the PORTC ODR whenever I want to have a quick look at it (as an example.)

Is there any way to label memory addresses in Eclipse debugger?  I've done quite a bit of searching, and it seems like you have to build an Eclipse plugin.  It seems a bit nonsensical not to be able to just define a bunch of memory address labels in a file. :-//

enz:
Take a look at http://embsysregview.sourceforge.net/.
Don't know the current status of the project, but last year i used it with an Energy-Micro Cortex-M3 and it worked well.

Regards,
Martin

Harvs:
Thanks Marin, that's great :-+

Really good plugin with all the definitions as well.

They probably just need to throw a keywords section in their webpage, because it's not all that easy to find with google.

Cheers

enz:

--- Quote from: Harvs on December 01, 2012, 11:41:33 am ---
They probably just need to throw a keywords section in their webpage, because it's not all that easy to find with google.

Cheers

--- End quote ---

You're right.
I saw this plugin mentioned in application note AN0023 from Energy-Micro:
http://www.energymicro.com/downloads/application-notes
This is an interesting HowTo for setting up an eclipse toolchain, not only for Energy-Micro devices!
I think they even updated this AppNote in August 2012 to cover the current Indigo-Version of eclipse.

Martin

mrflibble:

--- Quote from: enz on December 01, 2012, 09:25:34 am ---Take a look at http://embsysregview.sourceforge.net/.

--- End quote ---
Hey, that looks potentially useful. Thanks for the tip!  Just installed it and did a few quick tests. The interface for setting register values seems a bit clunky, but for quickly viewing peripheral registers it does the job nicely. :) Tested with an stm32f4 discovery board...

edit: looks like setting register values also works nicely as long as you press the right buttons. :P

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