Electronics > Microcontrollers

From PIC to STM32

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Veketti:
If I may continue to this regarding the development environment. As there are no development board for every type of MCU, how is the code to be ported to different MCU model? For example, you'll use STM32L476RET6 in final product, but closest development board is 511-NUCLEO-L476RG which has STM32L476RG mcu. It's the same family but with more flash memory. I'd assume, you'd just develop the code for the Nucleo in CubeIDE, then once finished start new project with STM32L476RET6. Then define all the same pins, clocks, exatly the same than what it was for Nucleo. Then copy all your code from between the /*USED CODE xx*/ tags and cross your fingers that it works on your PCB?

Or perhaps there's an easier way, like just change the MCU type and press generate?  ::)

Siwastaja:

--- Quote from: Veketti on December 07, 2023, 09:08:51 am ---If I may continue to this regarding the development environment. As there are no development board for every type of MCU, how is the code to be ported to different MCU model? For example, you'll use STM32L476RET6 in final product, but closest development board is 511-NUCLEO-L476RG which has STM32L476RG mcu.

--- End quote ---

Just build your own board using the final chip. I almost never use the "development boards", they are simply too far from the final application and you would spend a lot of time breadboarding hardware around the devboard. While the results of these breadboarding tests are useful, the work itself goes to waste.

The reason is simple: you will have some custom electronics that need development and testing anyway. By doing very first revision of the final board, you can develop HW/SW in parallel. Even the quickly designed "prototype zero" board will reveal hardware problems, ideas, etc., which is extremely helpful when designing the next revision, which could be very close to the final product. "Prototype zero" can also be shown to management, customers, etc.; it's the first step in right direction, but changes are still easy to make.

For example:
1) board revision 0, design in a few days, ignore time-consuming parts and don't try to optimize to perfect design; order boards from China ASAP
2) during wait time, finish BOM details (like resistor values), order components, start writing software
3) components arrive. Keep writing software
4) boards/stencils arrive. Now you have components, board and some initial version of your firmware. Hand-assemble and start real development work.

SuzyC:
Siwastaja, special thanks for such clear advice!

My problem is that I am such a Noob and so not able to layout a proto rev 0 board because I lack the basic familiarity with working with a 3.3 ARM M0 chip and I need to experiment with a STM ARM M0 chip on a working proto board to learn the chio's quirks/capabilities to begin with. I got to setup a work environment/toolchain.

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