Electronics > Microcontrollers

How did you survive prior to the internet making information easy to find?

(1/15) > >>

e100:
I'm about to start an ESP32 project and today I saw someone on a forum mention that the GPIO pin toggle speed was way slower than the clock speed would suggest. I checked the ESP32 sitting on my desk and two minutes later I was looking at this post https://www.esp32.com/viewtopic.php?t=1595 which confirmed the behavior.

So how did you find out about this kind of stuff prior to internet making information searchable?


evb149:
Well before the internet was popular there were electronic bulletin board systems, or USENET / gopher if you did have internet access at work / school / whatever before the "web" was popular.

And of course "user groups", "clubs", "groups", etc. with people doing similar projects where one could ask.

But also just a lot of self trial and error.
Based on my own recollection though of the 1990s and before a LOT of the technology was a LOT simpler back then so it wasn't nearly as complicated in the "bugs", "quirks", "weird software" areas as we have now.   Sure there were those things but in simpler systems and ones not driven by such a mess of 3rd party firmware / software that one could only speculate how / where something might be going wrong.

An ESP32 would be like AMAZING technology that you'd expect in like a whole rack full of equipment in 1990.

Back then late 1980s early 1990s  you'd be lucky to be working with Z80 / 8088 / 8086 / 6802 / PIC12 or similar chips,
and one's desktop computer might have somewhere around the same level of storage and processing power as some of these ESP32s have today on a chip.




pcprogrammer:
Don't forget about datasheets that you could request from suppliers and electronics fairs to look around for new technology.

Or libraries with books for that matter or the popular electronics magazines.

evb149:
Or companies that actually still hired helpful application engineers / tech support people who responded to email / phone.

There was actually a brief shining time around the 1995-2000ish era when you could call up a few of the major semiconductor
companies and get them to mail you a CD/DVD with ALL their catalogs, application notes, data sheets, etc. on them.
Yeah it'd take a week to get, but then you really had it all right there at your fingertips on your own PC at least if they didn't
use some horrible "application" as their catalog instead of just PDFs / databases etc.

Ironically that was WAY faster to get a bunch of data sheets, drawings, etc. from a few different companies than it is today
with their awfully pretty but totally unusable web sites where it'd now take someone something like six months of continual effort just to "point, click, download, save-as" their whole list of a few thousand data sheets / application notes one by one to their own PC.

They really just need a github or something where one can just "git clone https://www.molex.com/product_data/all" similar
to the way one used to be able to get it on CD or by FTP.


--- Quote from: pcprogrammer on June 19, 2022, 07:34:53 am ---Don't forget about datasheets that you could request from suppliers and electronics fairs to look around for new technology.

Or libraries with books for that matter or the popular electronics magazines.

--- End quote ---

RoGeorge:
At first, we survived with printed on paper info:  books, databooks (a book of datasheets), magazines.

I remember the whole floor used to be filled with all kinds of books and magazines, all opened at a given page or article that was related to whatever project was happening at the moment.  It was the equivalent of a web browsers with many open tabs.  ;D

That was not very efficient, so we invented the Internet.  :P

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

There was an error while thanking
Thanking...
Go to full version