Author Topic: Lightweight Scripting Language for MCUs  (Read 28240 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline BloodyCactus

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 482
  • Country: us
    • Kråketær
Re: Lightweight Scripting Language for MCUs
« Reply #25 on: August 23, 2016, 06:23:03 pm »
How "lightweight" is it? I found this on the Lua website:

Quote
The source contains around 24000 lines of C. Under 64-bit Linux, the Lua interpreter built with all standard Lua libraries takes 245K and the Lua library takes 420K.

That's awfully big! I doubt it would be as large when built for a 32-bit MCU, but it's still not exactly what I'd call lightweight. How much can you strip out of it while maintaining its usefulness?

you could strip quite a lot out like the compiler side of it and just upload pre bytecompiled scripts etc and remove some of its standard libs you dont need.

check out https://www.lua.org/notes/ltn002.html for info on doing this on an older version of lua.

they got it the core of lua down to 24k

you would have to compiler the lua compiler and the eventual embedded interp code to have the same lua_number size (like int32_t or something instead of double unless you want double) and build the ocmpiler on the same endianness. (well thats what I had to do back in the day)
« Last Edit: August 23, 2016, 06:25:56 pm by BloodyCactus »
-- Aussie living in the USA --
 

Offline nctnico

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 27366
  • Country: nl
    • NCT Developments
Re: Lightweight Scripting Language for MCUs
« Reply #26 on: August 23, 2016, 06:29:13 pm »
Lua seems to be the lightweight scripting language of choice/
+1

How "lightweight" is it? I found this on the Lua website:

Quote
The source contains around 24000 lines of C. Under 64-bit Linux, the Lua interpreter built with all standard Lua libraries takes 245K and the Lua library takes 420K.

That's awfully big! I doubt it would be as large when built for a 32-bit MCU, but it's still not exactly what I'd call lightweight. How much can you strip out of it while maintaining its usefulness?
You need to look for eLua (embedded Lua).
There are small lies, big lies and then there is what is on the screen of your oscilloscope.
 

Offline krho

  • Regular Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 223
  • Country: si
Re: Lightweight Scripting Language for MCUs
« Reply #27 on: August 23, 2016, 08:10:12 pm »
There is a pascal from the author of Nuttx. Have no idea if you can just take the interpreter and put is inside your project but its worth a try.
 

Offline TJ232

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 331
  • Country: 00
  • www.esp8266-projects.org
    • ESP8266 Projects
Re: Lightweight Scripting Language for MCUs
« Reply #28 on: August 24, 2016, 04:30:03 am »
Lua seems to be the lightweight scripting language of choice/

+1.
Quite nice and easy to use.
You can find a lot of ESP8266 examples, drivers, projects, etc on http://www.esp8266-projects.com

Micropython and ESP Basic are also 2 interpreters that worth a look.

Used lately ESP Basic to quick build a test rig for some boards, nothing fancy, but a less than 30 min job ended with a nice automated validation tool with web interface included :)
ESP8266 Projects - www.esp8266-projects.org
MPDMv4 Dimmer Board available on Tindie: https://www.tindie.com/stores/next_evo1/
 

Offline legacy

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • !
  • Posts: 4415
  • Country: ch
Re: Lightweight Scripting Language for MCUs
« Reply #29 on: August 24, 2016, 06:27:00 am »
Lua seems to be the lightweight scripting language of choice/

+1.
Quite nice and easy to use.

eLua is also implemented and used by Texas Instruments for their CAS(2) pocket calculators in the TI-NspireCAS line
even the classic version(3) is able to have eLua aboard as "alternative" language(1)

as specifications,  those nspire calculators are ARM mini computers with 32-64Mbyte of ram and 2-10Mbyte of flash
yes: they can run linux, it doesn't make practical sense but as "intellectual challenge" t few linux-ports already exist, the CPU comes with TLB

therefore eLua on those calculators is not a strictly low level like MPUs (e.g. 8051,AVR8,...), it's medium level about the hardware 
but on ebay I have seen a few PIC32 equipped and sold (under 20-30 USD) with a built-in eLua interpreter  :-//


(1) the primary language on those calculators is BASIC, also supported by the old TI89/92,TI83,T84 line
(2) CAS, computer algebra system, something like Mathematica, able to manipulate symbols in mathematical expressions, also able to calculate integrals, differential equations, etc, but not so advanced like PC-software, anyway it comes with a lot of complexity, therefore eLua is a good choice in order "to glue" the user interface with algorithms and mathematical tools, according with feedbacks from users (students) … compared with TI-BASIC, eLua has actually boosted the productivity and reduced the frustration, it's more than appreciated in the last CX2-nspire line
(3) calculators with R1-R2 layout (<=2008 machines), they can have eLua once upgraded to the last firmware available, TIOS-v3.9.0.463
 

Offline Sal AmmoniacTopic starter

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 1741
  • Country: us
Re: Lightweight Scripting Language for MCUs
« Reply #30 on: August 31, 2016, 11:00:48 pm »
How about Scheme? Does anyone have any experience using this language as an extension language for microcontrollers in the Cortex-M4 class? Are there any good free implementations?

I used to be an enthusiastic GNU Emacs user back in the day and wrote quite a lot of code in its extension language, eLisp.
"That's not even wrong" -- Wolfgang Pauli
 

Offline ebclr

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 2329
  • Country: 00
Re: Lightweight Scripting Language for MCUs
« Reply #31 on: September 01, 2016, 09:26:35 am »
http://www.cypress.com/products/ez-usb-fx2lp?source=search&keywords=ez%20usb

It's a different approach but extremelly powerfull to do your intent
 

Offline l3VGV

  • Contributor
  • Posts: 12
  • Country: ru
Re: Lightweight Scripting Language for MCUs
« Reply #32 on: March 21, 2021, 01:19:41 am »
Spent more then a 2 weeks researching same topic.

Im using stm32f103c8 'blue pills' mostly, as a HID devices. Even with bloaty HAL libraries i have 45k FLASH and 15k of RAM free, and CPU is never used like at all.

Need to add complex logic on top of my apps. And make it work in hostile environment - user is stupid and can hang device or try to steal my IP with hacking.
So cant run another pure binary, need VM with execution time limits and all OPs arguments check.

User must have access to scripting, thru lightweight config utility. So no GCC! or complete Java compiler.

*

FORTH. Not my kind of syntax(sarcasm).


Good stuf.

If u have like 60k+ FLASH space go for MicroPython, best choice today IMO. Very good code, not fastest one, but we dont need speed anyway. Can run bytecode from FLASH.


If u for new stuff - BERRY, flash footprint with all modules off is 39k! very cool and clean syntax. Cant run bytecode from flash, yet.
https://github.com/Skiars/berry/tree/master/examples


Last thing worth mentioning - PAWN. Very small and blazing fast VM, 15k flash size!. Very good documentation, on language itself and  implementation.
Very bugy compiler(it ether corrupt stack and crush, or go infinite loop). Syntax is poor, but FFI is ok. All static, all compile time. No variable arrays, or dictionaries, or classes and rest of those new nonsense.
But static is good, no memory juggling = no fragmentation.
(im going with that one)


picoC. very slow, so sloooooow. Too slow.


mJS very nice javascript VM, but a litle too big for me.

LUA/eLUA have again strange syntax for my taste, i like classes and structs. and RAM usage is a bit too high for f103c8.(start form 10k).


some more reading attached

« Last Edit: March 21, 2021, 12:10:44 pm by l3VGV »
 
The following users thanked this post: nctnico

Offline nctnico

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 27366
  • Country: nl
    • NCT Developments
Re: Lightweight Scripting Language for MCUs
« Reply #33 on: March 22, 2021, 12:36:31 am »
Did you get eLua going? It is still on my bucket list to make it work on NXP's ARM microcontrollers but never got time for it.
There are small lies, big lies and then there is what is on the screen of your oscilloscope.
 

Offline gnuarm

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 2247
  • Country: pr
Re: Lightweight Scripting Language for MCUs
« Reply #34 on: March 22, 2021, 02:29:11 am »
Forth?
Probably too tiny?
Someone should do a bit of host side programming to allow a generic forth to import cmsis-style .xml or .h files to pick up words for accessing the peripherals.

Forth is an interesting language. I've tried to like it over the years but just haven't been able to get my head around it. Too weird, plus it has the reputation of being a cult language. I remember back in the 80s lots of guys saying that Forth was about to take over and you weren't on the bandwagon you'd be left behind. Never happened...

The thing that turned me off was the stack-oriented nature of the language. Variables were rarely used--instead you needed to keep track of what was on the stack and invoke operations to copy and move things around on the stack. I tried, but could never keep track of what was where in my head and always had to write tedious comments like (n1 n2 n3 -- n2 n3 n1) for every operation to have any hope of keeping track of where everything was. I also found that if I came back to a piece of code I'd written more than about a few days previously I couldn't understand it without staring at it for a long time.

This is a common complaint with Forth.  It does mean the user is stuck in the world of more complex languages and has not taken to heart the ideas that make Forth easy to use. 

There is an explicit stack which is not hidden as it is in other languages.  This removes the complications of syntax for defining and invoking subroutines so that they become the  tools of the language and so are refereed to as simply "words" rather than subroutines.  In fact, "words" is a good way to think of programming in forth, when you define words you are extending the language into an application specific language. 

Once you grasp that idea fully, it is very powerful and leaves you with a magnificent tool moreso than a programming language. 

I've never figured out why people don't like it.  Maybe if they had been exposed to Forth early on, before being "ruined" by other languages they would not have issues accepting the stack or RPN. 
Rick C.  --  Puerto Rico is not a country... It's part of the USA
  - Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
  - Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209
 

Offline gnuarm

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 2247
  • Country: pr
Re: Lightweight Scripting Language for MCUs
« Reply #35 on: March 22, 2021, 02:32:31 am »
Forth?
Probably too tiny?
Someone should do a bit of host side programming to allow a generic forth to import cmsis-style .xml or .h files to pick up words for accessing the peripherals.

I don't do so much MCU programming these days, but I believe this has already been done.  If someone is interested, I could nose around the Forth groups and ask.

Most of my Forth coding these days is on a PC for operating an FPGA based test fixture for boards that I build.  I likely have a large order coming in and I need to add some things to the test program, so I'll be cracking open that nut again. 
Rick C.  --  Puerto Rico is not a country... It's part of the USA
  - Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
  - Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209
 

Offline techman-001

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • !
  • Posts: 748
  • Country: au
  • Electronics technician for the last 50 years
    • Mecrisp Stellaris Unofficial UserDoc
Re: Lightweight Scripting Language for MCUs
« Reply #36 on: March 22, 2021, 03:00:24 am »
Forth?
Probably too tiny?
Someone should do a bit of host side programming to allow a generic forth to import cmsis-style .xml or .h files to pick up words for accessing the peripherals.

I don't do so much MCU programming these days, but I believe this has already been done.  If someone is interested, I could nose around the Forth groups and ask.

Most of my Forth coding these days is on a PC for operating an FPGA based test fixture for boards that I build.  I likely have a large order coming in and I need to add some things to the test program, so I'll be cracking open that nut again.

The latest release of SVD2FORTH is out now: https://sourceforge.net/projects/mecrisp-stellaris-folkdoc/files/svd2forth-v3-stm32-20.03.21-F7a01.zip

It's designed for Mecrisp-Stellaris, produces a memory map file, a bitfields file and also transforms the SVD into a useful equates.s file for assembly use. Details in the readme.
 

Offline l3VGV

  • Contributor
  • Posts: 12
  • Country: ru
Re: Lightweight Scripting Language for MCUs
« Reply #37 on: March 22, 2021, 06:56:30 am »
Did you get eLua going? It is still on my bucket list to make it work on NXP's ARM microcontrollers but never got time for it.

Well, i downloaded latest version and few docs, but... eLUA site was not updated for so long. End ebuilder is down.

Second, LUA syntax is not for me.

Third, it will use GC. FLASH and RAM footprint is very big, 10k+ RAM for itself(default import tables and system stuff) and much more than 64k FLASH. seems like it for the slightly bigger uc. Maybe it can be striped?

 

Offline JoeyG

  • Regular Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 122
  • Country: au
Re: Lightweight Scripting Language for MCUs
« Reply #38 on: March 22, 2021, 07:46:38 am »
Microphython and CircuitPython,   - but Phython on a MCU is not very efficient in terms of speed and memory usage.

Another is Micromite basic https://geoffg.net/micromite.html

Then there is the basic stamp  https://www.parallax.com/propeller-2/

 

Offline iMo

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 4896
  • Country: vc
Re: Lightweight Scripting Language for MCUs
« Reply #39 on: March 22, 2021, 07:15:58 pm »
@Sal: I've been messing with your dilemma for 40years already. The only "really interactive and complete" MCU tool fully running on a target is Forth, imho.  Well, you have to overcome the initial mental barrier first.
Btw, I read a guy from NZ is claiming his Forth can do Basic - ABCForth..
 

Offline gnuarm

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 2247
  • Country: pr
Re: Lightweight Scripting Language for MCUs
« Reply #40 on: March 23, 2021, 01:12:15 am »
I don't do so much MCU programming these days, but I believe this has already been done.  If someone is interested, I could nose around the Forth groups and ask.

Most of my Forth coding these days is on a PC for operating an FPGA based test fixture for boards that I build.  I likely have a large order coming in and I need to add some things to the test program, so I'll be cracking open that nut again.

The latest release of SVD2FORTH is out now: https://sourceforge.net/projects/mecrisp-stellaris-folkdoc/files/svd2forth-v3-stm32-20.03.21-F7a01.zip

It's designed for Mecrisp-Stellaris, produces a memory map file, a bitfields file and also transforms the SVD into a useful equates.s file for assembly use. Details in the readme.

It seems like for real work on MCUs Mecrisp is gaining the high ground and is on its way to becoming the defacto standard for embedded Forth.  The originator Matthias has put a lot of effort into porting to a number of MSP430 and ARM devices and boards.  I believe he has even ported it to the picoPi (or whatever they call it) as an image rather than an app running under Linux.  I think there is even a version that runs on a custom core in an iCE40 in case that's the way your boat floats. 

But what really sets it apart is that there is a growing set of documentation... something relatively unheard of in the Forth community... or other places.  lol 
Rick C.  --  Puerto Rico is not a country... It's part of the USA
  - Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
  - Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209
 

Offline iMo

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 4896
  • Country: vc
Re: Lightweight Scripting Language for MCUs
« Reply #41 on: March 23, 2021, 12:15:51 pm »
For example with Mecrisp-Stellaris for stm32f407 CM4 (an example) you got a file called lib_registers.txt with definition words for about 300 registers and bits.

You upload that lib into your F407 once (as a text via terminal for example) and you can play with the registers as you wish. Stellaris can save your dictionary words into its flash, thus all you need for an "interactive work" is to fire up your F407, connect a serial terminal and you can mess with your bits and registers on-line then (and save the new word into the F407's flash when happy).

In order to write a celestial navigation app all you would need is a mechanical teletype worst case.. Would be better if you got a PC which can do copy/paste and work with .txt files, however  :-DD

PS: after powering up the F407 mcu preloaded with the stock libraries and drivers you can send the status of your button wired to pinA0 of portA via Usart6 in a loop for example:

Code: [Select]
[ here you are in your terminal.. ]

\ these new words could be saved to F407's flash
compiletoflash

: button? 1 porta_idr bit@ ;
: PA0sendbuttonstate begin button? >usart6 cr >usart6  key? until ;

PA0sendbuttonstate

[..here is the usart6 output ]
1
1
0
0
1
1

Or just to look at the pins A0, C7, B17 input logic levels anytime

Code: [Select]
[ here you are in your terminal.. ]

1 0   lshift porta_idr bit@ .   1 ok.
1 7   lshift portc_idr bit@ .   0 ok. 
1 17  lshift portb_idr bit@ .   0 ok.

Or when too lazy

Code: [Select]
[ here you are in your terminal.. ]

\ these new words could be saved to F407's flash
compiletoflash

:  ib17 1 17  lshift portb_idr bit@   ;
:  ic7   1 7  lshift portc_idr bit@   ;
:  >u6   >usart6 ;

ib17  .   1     ok.
ic7   .   0     ok.
ib17  .   0     ok.

\ send out input values at pins C7 and B17 via usart6

ic7 >u6 ib17 >u6 cr ic7 >u6  ib17 >u6 cr ic7 >u6 ib17 >u6

[..here is the usart6 output ]

01
11
10


« Last Edit: March 23, 2021, 02:41:41 pm by imo »
 

Offline techman-001

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • !
  • Posts: 748
  • Country: au
  • Electronics technician for the last 50 years
    • Mecrisp Stellaris Unofficial UserDoc
Re: Lightweight Scripting Language for MCUs
« Reply #42 on: March 23, 2021, 01:27:50 pm »
Or if even lazier (using svd2forth) :

Code: [Select]
gpioc.

GPIOC_MODER.  RW   $40020800
3|3|2|2|2|2|2|2|2|2|2|2|1|1|1|1|1|1|1|1|1|1|
1|0|9|8|7|6|5|4|3|2|1|0|9|8|7|6|5|4|3|2|1|0|9|8|7|6|5|4|3|2|1|0
0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

GPIOC_OTYPER.  RW   $40020804
3|3|2|2|2|2|2|2|2|2|2|2|1|1|1|1|1|1|1|1|1|1|
1|0|9|8|7|6|5|4|3|2|1|0|9|8|7|6|5|4|3|2|1|0|9|8|7|6|5|4|3|2|1|0
0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0

GPIOC_OSPEEDR.  RW   $40020808
3|3|2|2|2|2|2|2|2|2|2|2|1|1|1|1|1|1|1|1|1|1|
1|0|9|8|7|6|5|4|3|2|1|0|9|8|7|6|5|4|3|2|1|0|9|8|7|6|5|4|3|2|1|0
0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0

GPIOC_PUPDR.  RW   $4002080C
3|3|2|2|2|2|2|2|2|2|2|2|1|1|1|1|1|1|1|1|1|1|
1|0|9|8|7|6|5|4|3|2|1|0|9|8|7|6|5|4|3|2|1|0|9|8|7|6|5|4|3|2|1|0
0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0

GPIOC_IDR.  RO   $40020810
3|3|2|2|2|2|2|2|2|2|2|2|1|1|1|1|1|1|1|1|1|1|
1|0|9|8|7|6|5|4|3|2|1|0|9|8|7|6|5|4|3|2|1|0|9|8|7|6|5|4|3|2|1|0
0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0

GPIOC_ODR.  RW   $40020814
3|3|2|2|2|2|2|2|2|2|2|2|1|1|1|1|1|1|1|1|1|1|
1|0|9|8|7|6|5|4|3|2|1|0|9|8|7|6|5|4|3|2|1|0|9|8|7|6|5|4|3|2|1|0
0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0

GPIOC_BSRR write-only

GPIOC_LCKR.  RW   $4002081C
3|3|2|2|2|2|2|2|2|2|2|2|1|1|1|1|1|1|1|1|1|1|
1|0|9|8|7|6|5|4|3|2|1|0|9|8|7|6|5|4|3|2|1|0|9|8|7|6|5|4|3|2|1|0
0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0

GPIOC_AFRL.  RW   $40020820
3|3|2|2|2|2|2|2|2|2|2|2|1|1|1|1|1|1|1|1|1|1|
1|0|9|8|7|6|5|4|3|2|1|0|9|8|7|6|5|4|3|2|1|0|9|8|7|6|5|4|3|2|1|0
0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0

GPIOC_AFRH.  RW   $40020824
3|3|2|2|2|2|2|2|2|2|2|2|1|1|1|1|1|1|1|1|1|1|
1|0|9|8|7|6|5|4|3|2|1|0|9|8|7|6|5|4|3|2|1|0|9|8|7|6|5|4|3|2|1|0
0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0
 ok.

 
The following users thanked this post: iMo

Offline techman-001

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • !
  • Posts: 748
  • Country: au
  • Electronics technician for the last 50 years
    • Mecrisp Stellaris Unofficial UserDoc
Re: Lightweight Scripting Language for MCUs
« Reply #43 on: March 23, 2021, 01:34:34 pm »
And these are all you need to see to know that this F407 Disco is running at 168 MHz.

Code: [Select]
RCC_CR.
RCC_CR.   $40023800
3|3|2|2|2|2|2|2|2|2|2|2|1|1|1|1|1|1|1|1|1|1|
1|0|9|8|7|6|5|4|3|2|1|0|9|8|7|6|5|4|3|2|1|0|9|8|7|6|5|4|3|2|1|0
0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
 ok.
RCC_PLLCFGR.
RCC_PLLCFGR.  RW   $40023804
3|3|2|2|2|2|2|2|2|2|2|2|1|1|1|1|1|1|1|1|1|1|
1|0|9|8|7|6|5|4|3|2|1|0|9|8|7|6|5|4|3|2|1|0|9|8|7|6|5|4|3|2|1|0
0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0
 ok.
RCC_CFGR.
RCC_CFGR.   $40023808
3|3|2|2|2|2|2|2|2|2|2|2|1|1|1|1|1|1|1|1|1|1|
1|0|9|8|7|6|5|4|3|2|1|0|9|8|7|6|5|4|3|2|1|0|9|8|7|6|5|4|3|2|1|0
0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0
 ok.
FLASH_ACR.
FLASH_ACR.   $40023C00
3|3|2|2|2|2|2|2|2|2|2|2|1|1|1|1|1|1|1|1|1|1|
1|0|9|8|7|6|5|4|3|2|1|0|9|8|7|6|5|4|3|2|1|0|9|8|7|6|5|4|3|2|1|0
0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
 

Offline iMo

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 4896
  • Country: vc
Re: Lightweight Scripting Language for MCUs
« Reply #44 on: March 23, 2021, 01:46:47 pm »
What is important to say is the user only writes
Code: [Select]
RCC_CR.
RCC_PLLCFGR.
RCC_CFGR.

as the command in the terminal.. :)
 

Offline gnuarm

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 2247
  • Country: pr
Re: Lightweight Scripting Language for MCUs
« Reply #45 on: March 23, 2021, 02:59:04 pm »
In order to write a celestial navigation app all you would need is a mechanical teletype worst case.. Would be better if you got a PC which can do copy/paste and work with .txt files, however  :-DD

What do you have against paper tape?  I would say I had a long history with fond memories of using paper tape, but it is exactly the opposite.  I used it for a short while only because it sucked so badly as soon as I could afford them I bought two 8 inch floppy disk drives which I never did a lot with because they sucked so badly.  The OS would allocate half the remaining disk space for each file opened, so if you wanted a .obj, a .lst and another file output from an assembly pass, the third file opened only got 1/8th of the remaining disk space and often the process would crap out when the file filled up.  At least that never happened with the paper tape punch.  lol

Now from one room in the house I tap into a target board hanging off a raspberry pi in another room and download source code to the target to run tests.  What a Long Strange Trip It's Been. 
Rick C.  --  Puerto Rico is not a country... It's part of the USA
  - Get 1,000 miles of free Supercharging
  - Tesla referral code - https://ts.la/richard11209
 
The following users thanked this post: newbrain

Offline tggzzz

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 20027
  • Country: gb
  • Numbers, not adjectives
    • Having fun doing more, with less
Re: Lightweight Scripting Language for MCUs
« Reply #46 on: March 23, 2021, 03:12:05 pm »
What do you have against paper tape?  I would say I had a long history with fond memories of using paper tape, but it is exactly the opposite. 

I started using 5-channel paper tape in 5cps teleprinters. Grim - especially flipping between figure-shift and number-shift. Modern devices have returned to those wretched keyboards :(

Mind you, it was fun watching a 1000cps paper tape reader spew the tape 2m horizontally into a big basket - and stop instantly. Paper cuts? What are they?
There are lies, damned lies, statistics - and ADC/DAC specs.
Glider pilot's aphorism: "there is no substitute for span". Retort: "There is a substitute: skill+imagination. But you can buy span".
Having fun doing more, with less
 
The following users thanked this post: iMo

Offline phil from seattle

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 1029
  • Country: us
Re: Lightweight Scripting Language for MCUs
« Reply #47 on: March 23, 2021, 03:18:58 pm »
Here we go again.  I had to key in the bootloader for a PDP 11/40 backwards in the snow. so there.
 
The following users thanked this post: nctnico, mycroft, elecdonia, iMo

Offline tggzzz

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 20027
  • Country: gb
  • Numbers, not adjectives
    • Having fun doing more, with less
Re: Lightweight Scripting Language for MCUs
« Reply #48 on: March 23, 2021, 03:34:59 pm »
Bootloader? You mean it wasn't already in the core memory when power was reapplied?
There are lies, damned lies, statistics - and ADC/DAC specs.
Glider pilot's aphorism: "there is no substitute for span". Retort: "There is a substitute: skill+imagination. But you can buy span".
Having fun doing more, with less
 

Offline phil from seattle

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 1029
  • Country: us
Re: Lightweight Scripting Language for MCUs
« Reply #49 on: March 23, 2021, 04:41:47 pm »
Bootloader? You mean it wasn't already in the core memory when power was reapplied?

No, the Space Sciences department across the street had a prototype doppler weather radar that regularly corrupted the core memory.
« Last Edit: March 23, 2021, 04:43:39 pm by phil from seattle »
 


Share me

Digg  Facebook  SlashDot  Delicious  Technorati  Twitter  Google  Yahoo
Smf