Author Topic: PWM control module.  (Read 4594 times)

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Offline firewalker

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PWM control module.
« on: November 10, 2011, 03:29:14 pm »
Is there any general purpose PWM modules with microcontroller input in order to drive "high" power DC devices? E.g. 12 volt 3 Amps pwm module. I am sure I had came across with such devices but can find them now (it was something like solid state relay).



 Alexander.
« Last Edit: November 10, 2011, 03:43:42 pm by firewalker »
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alm

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Re: PWM control module.
« Reply #1 on: November 10, 2011, 09:24:49 pm »
Do you mean a MOSFET?
 

Offline firewalker

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Re: PWM control module.
« Reply #2 on: November 10, 2011, 10:12:47 pm »
??. ? MOSFET is a discrete component. It was like a solid state relay as I said (actually a very fast ssr).

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Offline Balaur

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Re: PWM control module.
« Reply #3 on: November 10, 2011, 10:37:57 pm »
As Alm suggested, a logic-level MOSFET transistor is a perfect candidate for your application.

However, all depends on the application you have in mind:

a) If you already have a perfectly good DC Power Source (constant voltage), a MOSFET is all you need
b) If you don't have a DC power, have a look into the pre-made Point Of Load (POL) modules. Many of them support an ON/OFF control and with some luck, maybe some of them are able to be driven with a PWM signal. Then you can directly control the POL module
c) If you just want to drive some LEDs or such, most common LED drivers directly accept a PWM control input.

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Offline Balaur

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Re: PWM control module.
« Reply #4 on: November 10, 2011, 10:39:57 pm »
However, I forgot to add that it's quite improbable that a PWM method works on any device that has some kind of decoupling capacitors.
 

Offline firewalker

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Re: PWM control module.
« Reply #5 on: November 10, 2011, 11:14:38 pm »
I know that a MOSFET is an exact match. 99.99% the device would contain a power MOSFET.

I was intrigued by the nice packet with screw terminals. The device was referred as a pwm driver. Can't recall where it was. Perhaps a magazine advert.
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Offline NiHaoMike

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Re: PWM control module.
« Reply #6 on: November 12, 2011, 04:09:58 am »
You'll likely need a MOSFET driver in order to get low switching losses. That's especially true if you're using a low voltage processor and/or using high PWM frequencies.
Quote
However, I forgot to add that it's quite improbable that a PWM method works on any device that has some kind of decoupling capacitors.
Add an inductor. Then you get a buck converter.
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Offline IanJ

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Re: PWM control module.
« Reply #7 on: January 25, 2012, 09:15:44 pm »
Is there any general purpose PWM modules with microcontroller input in order to drive "high" power DC devices? E.g. 12 volt 3 Amps pwm module. I am sure I had came across with such devices but can find them now (it was something like solid state relay).

 Alexander.

If I'm reading you correctly.....

http://www.dimensionengineering.com/

Look at their Sabertooth DC motor controllers.
I'm currently using one of their dual 60amp ones in a home made Segway.

However, be careful when looking at these types of drivers as they all claim PWM input compatibility, but in actual fact they are analogue input and you need an external RC to convert PWM.
In saying that, you do get true digital comms if you use their RC input mode (700uS to 1700uS).

There are loads of others out there.

Ian.
« Last Edit: January 25, 2012, 09:17:32 pm by IanJ »
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