Author Topic: Why HCS08 not popular with hobbyists.  (Read 3408 times)

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Online Tomorokoshi

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Re: Why HCS08 not popular with hobbyists.
« Reply #25 on: April 09, 2019, 05:29:55 pm »
In quite a lot of cases though the expensive stuff is just as crappy or sometimes worse than the free options.

Quite. At least with the free stuff you do have a chance of connecting with the original developer(s) for support, or at least have access to the schematics and firmware. With many 'professional' solutions you have almost no chance of getting worthwhile support once the supplier has moved onto their next and greatest version. And because the developer has been made redundent and/or the software was lost in one of the many company reorganisations and takeovers that occurred shortly after you bought it.

Best you might get is the recommendation to upgrade to the latest and greatest Mk 7 bugfest - which might, or might not, fix the problem you have with the current version but will likely bring you a bundle of new improved and decidedly more 'interesting' problems. All for only $12K, less a generous 5% discount for being a naive schmuck loyal customer and to compensate for the $8K written off on the previous POS version.

with the added bonus of having to mess with license keys etc.

Yes, getting licenses set up in corporate servers is almost as miserable as getting software tools. License and purchase requests require layers of cost justification and interaction with management that is deterrent enough to shift to less optimal tools and platforms.

Motorola/Freescale/NXP/PDQ/etc. in particular was difficult this way. For industrial embedded projects, dealing with a network license is very troublesome due to the difficulty of even getting a network connection in some equipment location. FlexLM in particular is detestable.

I brought this up several times to local Freescale representatives at the time years ago. They never really figured it out. It's no surprise that ARM and PIC took much their actual and potential business away as new products got developed and old ones got updated. This was unfortunate, because my personal preference was for M68K derivatives when possible.

Microchip is also moving towards a network license model, which combined with the Java-burdened MPLAB X IDE results in painful experiences.

The question I asked them at the time was whether they were in the hardware business or the software business. Processor vendors need to make up their mind.
 

Offline nctnico

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Re: Why HCS08 not popular with hobbyists.
« Reply #26 on: April 09, 2019, 05:42:30 pm »
That is a good point about the licenses. Earlier this year I had to install a piece of software which uses a dongle. Getting it going took the better part of a day. Primarily due to the wrong drivers being installed  :palm: .
There are small lies, big lies and then there is what is on the screen of your oscilloscope.
 

Offline legacy

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Re: Why HCS08 not popular with hobbyists.
« Reply #27 on: April 09, 2019, 06:38:58 pm »
Motorola/Freescale/NXP/PDQ/etc. in particular was difficult this way. For industrial embedded projects, dealing with a network license is very troublesome due to the difficulty of even getting a network connection in some equipment location. FlexLM in particular is detestable.

well, have you ever used anything by Windriver? THEY are even more detestable, ... compared to them, everything else (especially the old FlexLM stuff) is .. a piece of cake  :D
 

Offline Siwastaja

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Re: Why HCS08 not popular with hobbyists.
« Reply #28 on: April 10, 2019, 01:39:25 pm »
Professional tools from manufactures which are be partly funded by the cost of the tools and generally have much better support than a bunch of hobbits on a forum. Not all open source/free tools are bad but may really are quite fractionanalized and with very arrogant forum support (if any).

It's interesting how this idea lives and lives. I do see it makes sense and the idea is internally coherent, so it's a valid expectation, but I'm seeing very little evidence that this is actually the case.

Quite the opposite has happened: "professional tools" have often become simple wrappers to run the open source tools. Many GNU tools, for example, have development history and tradition of three decades in them, and are used by almost anyone, hobbyist or professional. The proprietary part does less and less, and for a good reason: they have noticed it's better that way.

Whenever the "professional" tool is really a proprietary piece of software, it's quite common that it's an almost unusable piece of shit; but yes, if you pay enough, you'll get someone to answer the phone for you and help you out with an issue caused by their broken software.

This is the reality about most software development tools. In CAD, it's a different world altogether, where proprietary design software rocks and will probably do so for a long time.
« Last Edit: April 10, 2019, 01:43:27 pm by Siwastaja »
 


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