Author Topic: RISC-V microcontrollers from GigaDevice  (Read 4328 times)

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Online nctnico

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Re: RISC-V microcontrollers from GigaDevice
« Reply #50 on: August 28, 2019, 05:09:11 pm »
... And the Vega board https://open-isa.org/ with 4 cores :)

That's unusual, it has a NXP logo, and claims to have a foot in both camps, with ARM and RISC V cores. RF support and BGA with large memories (1.25MB Flash  384k RAM ) 
However, even with a Nov 2018 NXP data sheet download, a search on NXP.COM for RV32M1, finds nothing at all ?
The layout of the documents looks exactly like the documents from Freescale. This is very interesting because it may hint NXP is working on a new breed of non-ARM microcontrollers and maybe even SOCs.
There are small lies, big lies and then there is what is on the screen of your oscilloscope.
 

Online brucehoult

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Re: RISC-V microcontrollers from GigaDevice
« Reply #51 on: August 29, 2019, 06:41:55 am »
A story on the Longan Nano here, although I don't think there's any new info: https://www.cnx-software.com/2019/08/29/longan-nano-gd32v-risc-v-development-board-comes-with-lcd-display-and-enclosure/

And apparently the "Bumblebee" core is actually Andes N22. There's a story here: https://www.cnx-software.com/2019/08/28/andescore-n22-risc-v-core-rv32imac-rv32emac-instruction-sets/

This story doesn't seem to quite match the Gigadevice/Sipeed docs, for example the Sipeed docs say that PMP (Physical Memory Protection .. basically a set of several base&bound registers so you can detect things such as stack overflow or protect machine mode things from user mode code) is not implemented.
 
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Offline mac.6

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Re: RISC-V microcontrollers from GigaDevice
« Reply #52 on: September 01, 2019, 05:16:08 pm »
Here is an other one https://www.sifive.com/boards HiFive1 Rev B. Only 16KB of ram. And the Vega board https://open-isa.org/ with 4 cores :)

RV32M1 is not a true 4 core, it's 2+2, ie you use either ARM CM4/CM0+ or RI5CY/ZeroRISCY pair (and I think ARM/RISC-V hybrid also).
 

Online brucehoult

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Re: RISC-V microcontrollers from GigaDevice
« Reply #53 on: September 12, 2019, 05:05:15 am »
Just had a short conversation with Sipeed on twitter. They've just received the 2nd batch of 1000 Longan Nano boards, they have over 3000 ordered. The next batch is going to be about three or four weeks away -- which ties in with the delivery date on my order being October 9.

They said once they've caught up on board orders they'll be making the bare chips available too.
 
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Online coppice

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Re: RISC-V microcontrollers from GigaDevice
« Reply #54 on: September 12, 2019, 11:45:11 am »
A story on the Longan Nano here, although I don't think there's any new info: https://www.cnx-software.com/2019/08/29/longan-nano-gd32v-risc-v-development-board-comes-with-lcd-display-and-enclosure/

And apparently the "Bumblebee" core is actually Andes N22. There's a story here: https://www.cnx-software.com/2019/08/28/andescore-n22-risc-v-core-rv32imac-rv32emac-instruction-sets/

This story doesn't seem to quite match the Gigadevice/Sipeed docs, for example the Sipeed docs say that PMP (Physical Memory Protection .. basically a set of several base&bound registers so you can detect things such as stack overflow or protect machine mode things from user mode code) is not implemented.
They arrived just in time for longan season.  :)
 

Offline mac.6

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Re: RISC-V microcontrollers from GigaDevice
« Reply #55 on: September 16, 2019, 01:57:45 pm »
A story on the Longan Nano here, although I don't think there's any new info: https://www.cnx-software.com/2019/08/29/longan-nano-gd32v-risc-v-development-board-comes-with-lcd-display-and-enclosure/

And apparently the "Bumblebee" core is actually Andes N22. There's a story here: https://www.cnx-software.com/2019/08/28/andescore-n22-risc-v-core-rv32imac-rv32emac-instruction-sets/

This story doesn't seem to quite match the Gigadevice/Sipeed docs, for example the Sipeed docs say that PMP (Physical Memory Protection .. basically a set of several base&bound registers so you can detect things such as stack overflow or protect machine mode things from user mode code) is not implemented.

I have sources in China that says gigadevice is using Nuclei RISC-V IP and not Andes. Look at https://www.riscv-mcu.com  , FPGA page refers to Nuclei.
 

Online SiliconWizard

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Re: RISC-V microcontrollers from GigaDevice
« Reply #56 on: September 16, 2019, 02:47:19 pm »
Anyway, it's always nice to see new RISC-V entrants, but I personally don't care much for those small/borderline copycat MCUs (except for the core). Not my thing nor my needs at all. Of course they cover a significant market, just not mine.

I would like to see more of completely original, and a little more powerful RISC-V MCUs (such as the ones SiFive provides, but with more off-the-shelf variants).
The Kendryte initiative was pretty interesting. I got unfortunately disappointed with the lack of documentation and support.

What I would personally be interested in:
- Ultra-low power RISC-V MCUs. There are some that are reasonably low-power now, but still can't compete with ARM-Cortex-based ULP MCUs, and often by far,
- On the other end of the spectrum, beefier (but with still reasonable power consumption) ones, like in the 200-400 MHz range, and a sensible set of peripherals,
- And the absolute ideal: either of the above, but with additional reconfigurable logic blocks (such as a limited number of slices of a typical small FPGA)!

 
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Online brucehoult

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Re: RISC-V microcontrollers from GigaDevice
« Reply #57 on: September 16, 2019, 05:05:08 pm »
A story on the Longan Nano here, although I don't think there's any new info: https://www.cnx-software.com/2019/08/29/longan-nano-gd32v-risc-v-development-board-comes-with-lcd-display-and-enclosure/

And apparently the "Bumblebee" core is actually Andes N22. There's a story here: https://www.cnx-software.com/2019/08/28/andescore-n22-risc-v-core-rv32imac-rv32emac-instruction-sets/

This story doesn't seem to quite match the Gigadevice/Sipeed docs, for example the Sipeed docs say that PMP (Physical Memory Protection .. basically a set of several base&bound registers so you can detect things such as stack overflow or protect machine mode things from user mode code) is not implemented.

I have sources in China that says gigadevice is using Nuclei RISC-V IP and not Andes. Look at https://www.riscv-mcu.com  , FPGA page refers to Nuclei.

It's right there in the datasheet P14:

"Note: The Bumblebee core used for this MCU is jointly developed by Nuclei System Technology
and Taiwanese Andes Technology, and Nuclei System Technology provides authorization and
technical support services.At present, Nuclei System Technology can license the mass-proven N200
series of ultra-low-power commercial processor cores, as well as research a variety of high
performance embedded processor series, and provide customers with customized services."

http://dl.sipeed.com/LONGAN/Nano/DOC/Bumblebee%20core%20intro_en.pdf
 

Offline ale500

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Re: RISC-V microcontrollers from GigaDevice
« Reply #58 on: November 09, 2019, 11:58:23 am »
I ordered a couple of longan nano board from aliexpress as soon as I saw that they were available. Let's see when they show up...
Regarding the sw, the longan ide installer seems to include platformio, the compiler (so no need to install it extra... ) I already have vs code installed... I just wonder what is lightweight about this vs code...
 

Offline ralphrmartin

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Re: RISC-V microcontrollers from GigaDevice
« Reply #59 on: November 09, 2019, 06:26:52 pm »
Note - although this works on PlatformIO - it doesn't work on a Mac. You'll need Windows.

I ordered my Longan nano withe little LCD for a fiver. It took a while to find out how to drive the LCD, I found this helped:

https://github.com/Kevin-Sangeelee/gd32v_test
 

Offline hansd

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Re: RISC-V microcontrollers from GigaDevice
« Reply #60 on: November 11, 2019, 02:12:11 pm »
 
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Online GromBeestje

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Re: RISC-V microcontrollers from GigaDevice
« Reply #61 on: November 11, 2019, 02:27:45 pm »
Oooh! new toys. But I've got to get my "Sipeed Longan Nano" running yet. I can connect to it using JLinkExe, but I haven't managed to get OpenOCD connecting to it.
 

Offline hansd

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Re: RISC-V microcontrollers from GigaDevice
« Reply #62 on: November 11, 2019, 03:19:38 pm »
Which probe are you using with OpenOCD? It works with JLink.
 

Online GromBeestje

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Re: RISC-V microcontrollers from GigaDevice
« Reply #63 on: November 11, 2019, 06:15:35 pm »
I have an J-Link EDU Mini, and it works with the Seggers JLinkExe tool. At least I've tested connecting, halting, resetting and dumping the flash.

The problem with OpenOCD is probably that I need to find out what configuration file I need. I'm using a git build from the official repository. I've been able to connect, and it reports it recognised 1 hart, but it doesn't reset/halt. And once I got the core working, I also need to figure out the flash.
 

Offline trailp

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Re: RISC-V microcontrollers from GigaDevice
« Reply #64 on: November 13, 2019, 07:31:34 am »
hi folks

I received a few Lonan-Nano devices a few weeks ago.
I am using Linux, a text editor, Makefile and the installed DFU bootloader

The example code and firmware driver code is quite well laid out and
seems to have an examples for all the peripherals and a most of the
capabilites of the peripherals.  The SDK seems to be Eclipse based
but that is not my cup of tea. 

One thing that caught me out was that you need a modified 'dfu-util'
program to suppoet this chip (at least for Linux).  See this fork
  https://github.com/riscv-mcu/gd32-dfu-utils

I did a pin-toggle speed test and with some unravelling of the example
code 27 MHz can be done in a while loop with the default 108 MHz system
clock.  (Might be possible to do 54 MHz but my inline assembly is not
doing it yet - should be just one line if it is possible)
ADC, DAC, USART, DMA, timer - so fae everything seem to work

At the moment I am having issues getting printf working properly.  After
testing and some thought, I feel the problem is likely to be that I an idiot.

cheers
phil
 
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