Author Topic: What manufacturer/toolchain to start out with micros  (Read 1484 times)

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Offline donkey77

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What manufacturer/toolchain to start out with micros
« on: May 16, 2019, 05:18:04 am »
Hi All,

Without wishing to start a flame war I would like a bit of advice please. I am looking to move beyond the odd arduino dabbling and start to turn some ideas into custom pcbs. Before I steer myself down a dead end which manufacturer/software package/range of microcontrollers would you recommend to a beginner. If I'm going to start from scratch I would like to learn something that is somewhat future proof. I'll probably only have one or two projects each year so I'm not talking about a massive usage.
Currently I have the following requirements for the hardware: multipole PWM outputs, SPI, I2C communication etc, potential motor drive control/encoder input, adc/dac with 12 bit resolution or better, provision for a decent number of I/O, Display capability (LCD/Oled 4 line character type). As for software I would like a one off purchase instead of a subscription model. I understand upgrades and/or support for more advanced chip support may cost more but I hate having monthly/annual payments. I don't need either software  or hardware to be the cheapest but at the sametime for something that at the moment is an occasional hobby I don't want to remortgage the house!

Thanks in advance for any guidance and apologies if I haven't explained things clear enough.

Rich
 

Online pigrew

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Re: What manufacturer/toolchain to start out with micros
« Reply #1 on: May 16, 2019, 05:48:02 am »
Your requirements seem to be pushing you towards a mid-range micro with a bunch of pins, but you don't need any of the IoT/wireless networking things. Perhaps the STM32F3 series would have a chip that fits your needs. Another possibility would be the TI TiVA C TM4C123G though those are a bit more expensive. I'm less familiar with the offerings from other companies, though I'm sure that NXP and Microchip have suitable processors.

Most of the companies these days release free compilers + Eclipse-based IDEs. Otherwise, you would be looking at a toolchain from IAR. You probably should use the free development software that comes from the micro's manufacturer.

In terms of a RTOS, FreeRTOS is pretty common except for TI chips which would use TI-RTOS.

Your OLED display would probably use I2C or SPI, and not require any special MCU peripheral. Your motor drive and ADC requirements are probably the things to pay attention to. TI C2000 Piccolos are somewhat more difficult to program, but have some of the best motor-driving features (for example if you plan to drive BLDC).

Most companies will sell you a development/breakout board for between $US10 and US$30 with an integrated programmer.
 

Offline lucazader

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Re: What manufacturer/toolchain to start out with micros
« Reply #2 on: May 16, 2019, 06:04:14 am »
There are quite a few options out there. I would probably suggest going to a manufacturer that uses the Arm Cortex-M cores in their range.
Of these, the most common would be: ST's STM32, Atmel/Microchip's SAM, NXP and others.

All of these are supported with open source toolchains as well as toolchains which can be purchased. However Mos people here would recommend using the free gcc toolchain.
All three of these manufacturers provide a full toolchain and IDE for development for free. They all use the mentioned gcc compiler.

There are extensive ranges of micros from these manufacturers, so while some of the lowest end ones might not work for you. As you soon as you move up in the product lineup there will be something to fit your needs.

Personally I am an STM32 guy. As a simple way of getting started, you could download their new STM32CubeIDE (https://www.st.com/en/development-tools/stm32cubeide.html). This includes the full toolchain and an eclipse based IDE, as well as their CubeMX software which you can use to get started, configure pins as inputs or outputs, configure ADC/DAC peripherals and PWM channels etc. It will be a good starting point to have a play around.
And the dev boards for STM32 are quite cheap. The official ones with an ST-Link debugger built in are about $10-20 USD depending on what you choose. With some much cheaper ones available on aliexpress.

Anyway im sure some of the others will have more thoughts, opinions and advice on this and some will definitely disagree with me but hey, each to their own!
 

Offline KC0PPH

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Re: What manufacturer/toolchain to start out with micros
« Reply #3 on: May 16, 2019, 06:55:42 am »
PIC32 seems like a decent fit, you can do all of your development on free software (MPLAB and Harmony) and your programmer is $50.
 

Offline nctnico

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Re: What manufacturer/toolchain to start out with micros
« Reply #4 on: May 16, 2019, 06:56:00 am »
Nowadays Eclipse +GCC is pretty much standard. Manufacturers often bolt their own eco system on top of it but IMHO the added value isn't that high once you gained knowledge on how to configure the pins and peripherals. I strongly suggest to make sure to check out NXP's LPC ARM controllers. These are relatively simple to use and peripherials are the same across the entire line so you don't have to deal with a different peripheral if you need a controller with slightly different features.
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Online NivagSwerdna

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Re: What manufacturer/toolchain to start out with micros
« Reply #5 on: May 16, 2019, 07:07:17 am »
I am looking to move beyond the odd arduino dabbling and start to turn some ideas into custom pcbs.
That was my idea too but the 328p (UNO) is such an easy to use eco-system it is hard to give up that easily.  I would recommend producing some custom PCBs of your own around the 328p with the Arduino bootloader to start with.  It is actually really cheap to buy chinese clones and strip these for core components using hot air (https://www.mikrocontroller.net/attachment/258727/CH340G_UNO_ArduinoBoard_3.pdf being my favourite variant to lift as it has a proper XTAL).  You can take baby steps towards escaping by using AVR Studio but it might not be necessary.
I have a selection of PIC Discovery boards (24 and 32) which are tempting but I haven't used them in anger yet... STM32 has been in my cupboard for a while.. again need a kick to use it... possibly STM32F4 or STM32F7?
And if you can afford the power budget and need WiFi... you should really be looking at ESP32 etc.
If I could only chose one and someone took away my AVRs... I would go STM32; in the meantime design a PCB with what you know... Elecrow et al... are waiting for your order (and use the free edition of DipTrace  ;) )

PS
Maybe you should swallow the Blue Pill? STM32F103C8? (Meets the requirements) [STM32VLDISCOVERY?]
« Last Edit: May 16, 2019, 07:49:49 am by NivagSwerdna »
 

Offline IDEngineer

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Re: What manufacturer/toolchain to start out with micros
« Reply #6 on: May 16, 2019, 07:21:45 am »
PIC32 seems like a decent fit, you can do all of your development on free software (MPLAB and Harmony) and your programmer is $50.
Another vote for the Microchip PIC families. The free development environment works pretty well, and you can optionally buy "better" versions of the compiler on an annual or monthly subscription basis at anytime. You can also obtain a free 30 day trial period of the "better" versions to see how it works for you, and the development environment will do a real-time comparison to estimate how much code/data space you'd save with the "better" version. To be honest, I've done all of the above yet have reverted back to the free versions because they've been more than adequate for my needs.

Customer support from Microchip is remarkable. Their support tickets get real attention from staff within very reasonable amounts of time. In one case, I raised a question and was asked if it was OK for them to set up a conference call with us to discuss it in real time. They weren't kidding around, they had at least two silicon engineers, at least two app engineers, and at least one sales and one management on that call! They stayed on the phone for an hour running through things, making sure we had a meeting of the minds, and copied me on the internal emails that addressed the question going forward. Best customer service I've EVER received in the component industry. (Funny side note: During the call we reminded them we aren't their largest customer, that year perhaps consuming 10K MCU's from them. They replied that they know smaller shops are their bread and butter and the mandate to support smaller shops comes straight from the top of the company. Sounds good to me!)

The PIC's themselves have a bit of an odd MCU architecture but so far, when optimizing with hand-coded Assembly, I haven't had a reason to pound the table in frustration. Easily 95% of our firmware is in C/C++ so it's an edge case anyway. Their compilers are reasonable, have good libraries, and the head of the team that writes/maintains them personally hangs out in the Microchip forums. I'd say 50% of the threads raising questions about the compiler have an answer from that guy.

Their on-chip peripherals are quite good, and I keep being amazed at what can be done with them to push functionality onto the hardware instead of the firmware. They have an MCU selector on their website that makes it easy to dial in the models that contain the peripherals, pin counts, etc. that you need for a given project.

Finally, they have a nice range of debuggers. They sell one for $15 - not a typo - and the PICkit series is the ~$50 unit mentioned by KC0PPH above. Those are considered hobbyist level, the baseline professional unit is the ICD3 which has been recently replaced with the ICD4. Compared to the lesser debuggers the ICD series uses "production" programming voltages, has better hardware breakpoint support, etc. I've yet to hear from anyone that "needed" the ICD4 nor any better features unique to that unit, but the good side effect is Microchip is flushing out their stock of ICD3's right now for $99 each in their company store. I just picked up an extra one as a backup, at that price it's really cheap insurance. So if you go with Microchip, just spend the $100 and start with their professional-level ICD3. Since all the software is free, you're still only $100 out of pocket. This one debugger will work on almost every MCU they make, it gets transparently reconfigured with free firmware when you switch devices. By the way, Microchip shipped mine UPS Next Day Air yet shipping was under ten bucks.

There are plenty of good MCU choices out there. Just wanted to give some background on why we like Microchip. Report back on what you decide!

Disclaimer: No connection with Microchip except as a very happy customer.
« Last Edit: May 16, 2019, 07:24:51 am by IDEngineer »
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Online NivagSwerdna

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Re: What manufacturer/toolchain to start out with micros
« Reply #7 on: May 16, 2019, 07:41:21 am »
..Finally, they have a nice range of debuggers.
FWIW For PIC the https://www.microchip.com/promo/curiosity-development-boards dev kits have PICKIT onboard so you don't need to buy a debugger initially.
 

Offline Sal Ammoniac

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Re: What manufacturer/toolchain to start out with micros
« Reply #8 on: May 16, 2019, 07:47:42 am »
If you plan on doing motor control, take a look at the Infineon XMC4000 series. It's an ARM Cortex-M4 core with peripherals geared to industrial control applications like motor control.
 

Offline westfw

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Re: What manufacturer/toolchain to start out with micros
« Reply #9 on: May 16, 2019, 08:53:49 am »
The STM32 series seems to offer the most "bang per buck" in development boards.  $15 will get you a good-sized "Nucleo" Cortex M4 board with built-in debugger (actually, any of quite a range of M0, M3, M4 boards.)  Industry standard ARM CPU(s), wide range of parts, some significant user base...   Their support of "casual" and student users seems less than stellar (compared to Atmel/Microchip or TI) but...
TI also has nice cheap development boards, but a much smaller portfolio of parts.
Microchip (AVR, ARM, PIC32, PIC) has a lot of options, and the Arduino connection, but their bigger chips tend to come on expensive development boards.  Or I guess you could buy one of the Arduino derivatives...
 

Online NorthGuy

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Re: What manufacturer/toolchain to start out with micros
« Reply #10 on: May 16, 2019, 10:50:14 am »
As for software I would like a one off purchase instead of a subscription model. I understand upgrades and/or support for more advanced chip support may cost more but I hate having monthly/annual payments.

Don't even think about purchasing software for 1-2 projects per year. There are plenty of free stuff. Every manufacturer whants you to try their stuff for free.
 

Online techman-001

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Re: What manufacturer/toolchain to start out with micros
« Reply #11 on: May 16, 2019, 11:25:54 am »
Hi All,

Without wishing to start a flame war I would like a bit of advice please. I am looking to move beyond the odd arduino dabbling and start to turn some ideas into custom pcbs. Before I steer myself down a dead end which manufacturer/software package/range of microcontrollers would you recommend to a beginner. If I'm going to start from scratch I would like to learn something that is somewhat future proof. I'll probably only have one or two projects each year so I'm not talking about a massive usage.
Currently I have the following requirements for the hardware: multipole PWM outputs, SPI, I2C communication etc, potential motor drive control/encoder input, adc/dac with 12 bit resolution or better, provision for a decent number of I/O, Display capability (LCD/Oled 4 line character type). As for software I would like a one off purchase instead of a subscription model. I understand upgrades and/or support for more advanced chip support may cost more but I hate having monthly/annual payments. I don't need either software  or hardware to be the cheapest but at the sametime for something that at the moment is an occasional hobby I don't want to remortgage the house!

Thanks in advance for any guidance and apologies if I haven't explained things clear enough.

Rich

In 1976 we were paying $270 for a single 16 bit cpu with no peripherals and houses were cheap, nowadays embedded is literally as cheap as chips and houses are expensive.

I recommend STM32 mcu's for one reason alone, what other manufacturer has paid million$ of Dollars for a established HIGH END IDE company  to be able to GIVE their product away ?

STM purchased Atollic so you can have a kickarse C development system with EVERYTHING totally FREE:-

https://atollic.com/truestudio/

Plus STM32 chips are really cheap, jam packed with serious peripherals and have extensive FREE Open Source Support.
« Last Edit: May 16, 2019, 11:50:46 am by techman-001 »
 

Offline KC0PPH

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Re: What manufacturer/toolchain to start out with micros
« Reply #12 on: May 16, 2019, 11:33:51 am »
PIC32 seems like a decent fit, you can do all of your development on free software (MPLAB and Harmony) and your programmer is $50.
Another vote for the Microchip PIC families. The free development environment works pretty well, and you can optionally buy "better" versions of the compiler on an annual or monthly subscription basis at anytime. You can also obtain a free 30 day trial period of the "better" versions to see how it works for you, and the development environment will do a real-time comparison to estimate how much code/data space you'd save with the "better" version. To be honest, I've done all of the above yet have reverted back to the free versions because they've been more than adequate for my needs.

Customer support from Microchip is remarkable. Their support tickets get real attention from staff within very reasonable amounts of time. In one case, I raised a question and was asked if it was OK for them to set up a conference call with us to discuss it in real time. They weren't kidding around, they had at least two silicon engineers, at least two app engineers, and at least one sales and one management on that call! They stayed on the phone for an hour running through things, making sure we had a meeting of the minds, and copied me on the internal emails that addressed the question going forward. Best customer service I've EVER received in the component industry. (Funny side note: During the call we reminded them we aren't their largest customer, that year perhaps consuming 10K MCU's from them. They replied that they know smaller shops are their bread and butter and the mandate to support smaller shops comes straight from the top of the company. Sounds good to me!)

The PIC's themselves have a bit of an odd MCU architecture but so far, when optimizing with hand-coded Assembly, I haven't had a reason to pound the table in frustration. Easily 95% of our firmware is in C/C++ so it's an edge case anyway. Their compilers are reasonable, have good libraries, and the head of the team that writes/maintains them personally hangs out in the Microchip forums. I'd say 50% of the threads raising questions about the compiler have an answer from that guy.

Their on-chip peripherals are quite good, and I keep being amazed at what can be done with them to push functionality onto the hardware instead of the firmware. They have an MCU selector on their website that makes it easy to dial in the models that contain the peripherals, pin counts, etc. that you need for a given project.

Finally, they have a nice range of debuggers. They sell one for $15 - not a typo - and the PICkit series is the ~$50 unit mentioned by KC0PPH above. Those are considered hobbyist level, the baseline professional unit is the ICD3 which has been recently replaced with the ICD4. Compared to the lesser debuggers the ICD series uses "production" programming voltages, has better hardware breakpoint support, etc. I've yet to hear from anyone that "needed" the ICD4 nor any better features unique to that unit, but the good side effect is Microchip is flushing out their stock of ICD3's right now for $99 each in their company store. I just picked up an extra one as a backup, at that price it's really cheap insurance. So if you go with Microchip, just spend the $100 and start with their professional-level ICD3. Since all the software is free, you're still only $100 out of pocket. This one debugger will work on almost every MCU they make, it gets transparently reconfigured with free firmware when you switch devices. By the way, Microchip shipped mine UPS Next Day Air yet shipping was under ten bucks.

There are plenty of good MCU choices out there. Just wanted to give some background on why we like Microchip. Report back on what you decide!

Disclaimer: No connection with Microchip except as a very happy customer.

Any huge reason for a hobby guy to get a icd3 over just using the pickit 
 

Online NorthGuy

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Re: What manufacturer/toolchain to start out with micros
« Reply #13 on: May 16, 2019, 11:48:56 am »
Any huge reason for a hobby guy to get a icd3 over just using the pickit 

I wouldn't say that. The biggest difference is that ICD3 is faster than PICkit3.
 

Online rstofer

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Re: What manufacturer/toolchain to start out with micros
« Reply #14 on: May 16, 2019, 01:49:49 pm »
Why not write bare-iron code for the Arduino.  The 328P is a capable chip, the toolchain is already available and there is a dumpster full of code to copy.

I used the ATmega128 many years back - it's a great chip! 

I would rather take a beating than get back into the mid-range PICs.  They are architectural disasters that somehow won't die.  Constant paging and banking is part of the problem, the other is the lack of a stack pointer register.  This means that C compilers are challenged to produce decent code and is the reason that for many years, only crippled compilers were available.  GCC (probably the most used C compiler in the world) still doesn't handle PICs (AFAIK). Look at the assembly output of a C program and see all the banks and pages.

The PIC32 is a pretty nice chip but the future belongs to ARM and it doesn't much matter which vendor you pick.  I personally like the mbed LPC1768 module and I kind of like the online toolchain.  Nobody around here agrees with me re: the online tools but that's the way it goes.  Maybe ask someone who has actually used the toolchain to develop a project.  And, yes, I can bring the code and all of the libraries down for use with a local toolchain.  GCC works well.  I have done it with Rowley Crossworks.

Note that many STM32Fxxx boards are now mbed compatible...  The mbed project is now owned by ARM.
 

Offline wilfred

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Re: What manufacturer/toolchain to start out with micros
« Reply #15 on: May 16, 2019, 02:42:39 pm »
I suggest you consider the Texas Instruments Tiva C Launchpad http://www.ti.com/tool/EK-TM4C123GXL which is available from TI for US$13 plus shipping. I suggest it because it is pretty cheap from a reputable source and mostly because there is a Youtube channel that uses it for a series of course videos. They started out using the IAR toolchain which is free with code limitations but there is also the Code Composer Studio available from TI  for free these days with no code limitations. They switched to CCS around video 18 or 19 IIRC.

Watch the first few videos and see if it suits the way you like to learn. I thought it was very good and well structured. The last half dozen videos build a simple minimal RTOS (it is simple) that show the basic way an RTOS schedules threads. If there is a better intro to microcontrollers out there then I want to know of it.

This is the course website. http://www.state-machine.com/quickstart/

This is the YT video playlist.



 

Online techman-001

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Re: What manufacturer/toolchain to start out with micros
« Reply #16 on: May 16, 2019, 06:09:08 pm »
I personally like the mbed LPC1768 module and I kind of like the online toolchain.  Nobody around here agrees with me re: the online tools but that's the way it goes.
Note that many STM32Fxxx boards are now mbed compatible...  The mbed project is now owned by ARM.

I just had a quick look at Mbed OS 5 ( https://os.mbed.com/docs/mbed-os/v5.12/introduction/index.html ) because of your post. I ran the obligatory 'blinky' on a brand new Nucleo-STM32L073 (https://www.arrow.com/en/products/nucleo-l073rz/stmicroelectronics).

Here is my quick summary of Mbed on a Nucleo-STM32L073 on FreeBSD.

* fastest C toolchain to set up ever: it's all cloud based and set up already
* easiest system to flash the compiled binary to ever: just drag and drop the compiled binary file.
* tons of information, nicely laid out
* heaps of different boards and mcu support
* IoT support
* completely free

This system is very impressive, and if one is into learning C, $13.28 (for the Nucleo board above) gets you *everything*, there is *nothing* else to buy. No wonder ARM is annihilating the embedded space competition with all this FREE support.

If you want the nuclear option, get the FREE PC based Atollic IDE from STM.
 

Offline SWR

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Re: What manufacturer/toolchain to start out with micros
« Reply #17 on: May 16, 2019, 07:37:13 pm »
I will suggest that you take a serious look at the ESP32 suggested NivagSwerdna above.
You already know Arduino programming and this is compatible with that UI.
You have several SW choices: Arduino for ease of use, C programming IDE for more efficiency, Assembly for maximum efficiency on critical parts (although most won't need it because they're much faster than an AVR).

You get tripple cores and plenty of memory & I/O's in those small modules.
Two of the cores are high performance 32bit 240MHz while the third is low power for those long life battery applications.

Here's a quick comparison...
Code: [Select]
Tech. data:      Arduino Uno  ESP Wroom32
Price            €20          $3
MicroController  ATmega328P   Xtensa LX6
Voltage          5V           3,3V
CPU cores        1x8bit       3x32bit
Clock Speed      16M          240M
DMIPS            4.8          600 (125x faster)
DMIPs/MHz        0.30         2.5
DMIPS/mW         0.10         7.5
Float multiply   0.21MFLOPS   120MFLOPS (571x faster)
Flash            32K          4M (128x larger)
SRAM             2K           536K
EEPROM           1K           - (uses Flash)
Mem. card        -            SD/eMMC/SDIO
Digital I/O      14           36
PWM output       6            16
Touch input      -            10
DAC output       -            2x8bit
ADC input        6x10bit      18x12bit
UART             1            3
SPI              1            4
I²C              1            2
I²S              -            2 (camera and high speed audio)
IR               -            1
CAN 2.0          -            1
Ethernet         -            1
Encryption       -            AES (HASH, RSA, ECC, RNG)
Temperature      -            Built in temperature sensor
Magnetic field   -            Built in hall sensor
WiFi             -            Built in including antenna
Blutooth         -            Built in including antenna
Length           68.6mm       25.5mm
Width            53.4mm       18.0mm
For a dollar extra you get 16MB FLASH.
They really pack a punch for the money you pay.

Best regards
Soren
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Offline SteveyG

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Re: What manufacturer/toolchain to start out with micros
« Reply #18 on: May 16, 2019, 07:58:53 pm »
It surprises me how many are recommending 32-bit MCUs based on the requirements listed in the OP.  :-BROKE

The OP may as well start development on the Arduino already owned, developing and programming for the MCU already onboard. 

Online Fred27

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Re: What manufacturer/toolchain to start out with micros
« Reply #19 on: May 16, 2019, 08:07:10 pm »
As I'm sure you're starting to realise, they're all good and all have their fans! I mostly played with TI, ST and NXP. I ended up on TI and lots of nice STM32 dev boards gathered dust. Another minor plus is that TI have Energia so you can start off with a familiar Arduino environment to start with. (I've never used it myself, but heard good things about it.)

Definitely focus on one thought. The IDE and peripheral setup is just different enough that switching is a pain - for a hobbyist at least.
 

Offline wilfred

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Re: What manufacturer/toolchain to start out with micros
« Reply #20 on: May 16, 2019, 08:18:06 pm »
The OP did say he wanted to move on from dabbling with Arduino. Perhaps people took that to mean move up from 8 bits to something larger.  But I think the requirement for something future-proof is better taken up on an ARM device.

I found the combination I recommended useful and I can identify with the OP. Even if he did nothing else with it I think it would be money well spent. He'd be much better able to decide the next step.

I'm device/platform agnostic. If it suits the purpose, great. For hobby or self study I can't see it makes all that much difference whether it is 8 bits or 32bits.

I found the course useful and it used a TI Launchpad. And I had one. And I only bought it because TI had a sale. It wasn't a complex selection process. I just got lucky.

BTW to the OP the TI Stellaris the course mentions is now called a TIVA C but it was just a name change.

 

Offline IDEngineer

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Re: What manufacturer/toolchain to start out with micros
« Reply #21 on: May 17, 2019, 03:08:48 am »
I would rather take a beating than get back into the mid-range PICs.  They are architectural disasters that somehow won't die.
And yet, PIC's are everywhere. As I said earlier, their architecture is a bit odd but Microchip's compilers seem to have dialed in the process of yielding good code so you don't have to worry about the architecture unless you're hand-optimizing some Assembler. I'm on a PIC18 based project right now running at 64MHz, meaning an 8 bit CPU doing lots of double precision floating point math, and we're getting great performance. Their on-chip peripherals must be the result of several generations of refinement because they do a great job of offloading the workload from the firmware. This one device is doing full-duplex CAN network, interfacing with SPI peripheral chips (and doing math on the data obtained from them), doing A/D conversions, running four channels of PWM, plus three more real-time I/O operations and we have lots of idle CPU cycles.

PIC is by no means the only game in town, but speaking personally I definitely don't think a "beating" is better! :)
My political litmus test: I will vote for any candidate, regardless of party affiliation or positions on other issues, who promises to abolish the TSA.
 

Offline nctnico

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Re: What manufacturer/toolchain to start out with micros
« Reply #22 on: May 17, 2019, 03:14:46 am »
The STM32 series seems to offer the most "bang per buck" in development boards.  $15 will get you a good-sized "Nucleo" Cortex M4 board with built-in debugger (actually, any of quite a range of M0, M3, M4 boards.)
But the problem with the STM32 is that the serial bootloader is poorly implemented and the peripherals vary wildly so choosing a different controller requires learning different peripherals. The latter costs more in lost time in the end. Even for a hobby time is money. With NXP's LPC series it is very easy to move between various microcontrollers and use the same low-level code. As a result every project I build has a different type of microcontroller which is tailored to the project's requirement. You can't do that with STM32 (unless you use a bloated library provided by ST).
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Offline ucanel

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Re: What manufacturer/toolchain to start out with micros
« Reply #23 on: May 17, 2019, 04:02:49 am »
Instead of loosing time on asking these kind of nonsense which to use questions  you can easyly try all of them in a very short amount o time and use whichever you want to use.

These are called TOOLS it does not matter which one you select or use
there are not big amount of diffence between them,
important part is using the tools and achieving your goals.
 

Offline Dubbie

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What manufacturer/toolchain to start out with micros
« Reply #24 on: May 17, 2019, 04:40:15 am »
A few years back I faced the same question as you.
I tried NXP, but didn’t click with the development boards (almost certainly because of my inexperience at the time). I then tried STM32 and have never looked back. Have used probably a dozen different parts from them now F0, F1 and F4 and had a very pleasant experience with all of them.
 


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