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Should this VLAN setup work or my equipment failed?

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Rick Law:
Should this work?

I have a 24 ports 3com managed switch I acquired from a company closure sale.  The FANs failed so other failures is possible.

- The default is all ports on VLAN1 untagged.  They all worked.  The switch supports 802.1Q, I just left them as default untagged.
- I assigned 6 ports (that was functioning well in VLAN1) as VLAN2 untagged, intended as an isolated environment for equipment setup.  That worked - I do have that 6 ports communicating with each other but isolated from VLAN1.
- What doesn't work is when I patch cable VLAN2 to VLAN1 (using VLAN2 like a separate switch/hub joined to my main VLAN1 network via a patch cable)

I was expecting joining VLAN2 to VLAN1 via patch cable would work, but it doesn't.  Am I understanding VLAN wrong or could that be equipment failure?

Thanks for your input...

NiHaoMike:
Sounds like the switch has some anti bridging feature to prevent two network domains accidentally being joined together.

Rick Law:

--- Quote from: NiHaoMike on July 28, 2021, 03:29:11 am ---Sounds like the switch has some anti bridging feature to prevent two network domains accidentally being joined together.

--- End quote ---

Thanks for your input, I was thinking it may be that as well...  But I was not sure if it may be I misunderstood tagging and I should be using tagging some manner.  After reading the CISCO's tutorial on tagging, I was still at a lost, so I just wanted a second opinion.  Thanks for giving me that, I appreciated it.

nfmax:
Your two VLANs are two different networks. To route traffic between them you need a router, not a switch. This could be a PC with two network interfaces, set up to route traffic between them.

Rick Law:

--- Quote from: nfmax on July 28, 2021, 08:43:36 pm ---Your two VLANs are two different networks. To route traffic between them you need a router, not a switch. This could be a PC with two network interfaces, set up to route traffic between them.

--- End quote ---

Actually it is kind of half way...  I generally don't like doing firmware/BIOS upgrade or machine setup while it is exposed to the outside.  I would do it on a side-switch without connection to the main-network.  With a only s laptop and the device being setup on that switch, I can do things in a safer environment.  When ready, I may patch it into the main network for final test, then unplug and re-plug into the main network for deployment.

This latest project is a bit different.  I am trying to determine how big a speed-penalty by using a pair of MoCA modem to connect to my main-network.  So I am swapping connections in all sorts of ways - all within the same network but with and without the MoCA connection.  The physically separated side switch was doing the job.  I was considering replacing the side-switch with VLAN2 so I don't need another physical switch taking up space (and electrical outlet spots) thus giving me more flexibility.  Too bad that is not to be.

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