Author Topic: Anyone remember a SIMM-based hardware project  (Read 3318 times)

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Offline ColCon

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Anyone remember a SIMM-based hardware project
« on: September 30, 2019, 04:22:50 pm »
I seem to remember a SIMM-based hardware project, i think 30 pin, with various plug-in modules other than memory.
Basically a mini back plane processing concept. Anyone know what I'm taking about?
 

Online ledtester

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Re: Anyone remember a SIMM-based hardware project
« Reply #1 on: September 30, 2019, 04:56:22 pm »
 
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Offline ColCon

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Re: Anyone remember a SIMM-based hardware project
« Reply #2 on: September 30, 2019, 05:21:09 pm »
That's it! Thank you!
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Offline Gribo

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Re: Anyone remember a SIMM-based hardware project
« Reply #3 on: October 25, 2019, 01:51:48 pm »
There are many SOM's out there. Raspberry PI compute module is one example.
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Offline Doctorandus_P

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Re: Anyone remember a SIMM-based hardware project
« Reply #4 on: July 02, 2020, 07:23:53 pm »
My first thought also was the Dontronix module.

When I type in a simple search I get lots of results from multiple manufacturers:
https://www.startpage.com/row/search?q=som+simm+module&l=english
 

Offline wizard69

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Re: Anyone remember a SIMM-based hardware project
« Reply #5 on: July 02, 2020, 08:23:11 pm »
yes there are lot of people trying to promote this sort of idea.   It might be a good idea but there really needs to be a standard.   The Arduino and Raspberry PI form factors have become defacto standards with wide adoption, but I'm not sure anybody leads in the SIMM world.   Sadly the Arduino and PI formats never appeared to be well thought out to me.

My first thought also was the Dontronix module.

When I type in a simple search I get lots of results from multiple manufacturers:
https://www.startpage.com/row/search?q=som+simm+module&l=english
 

Offline tooki

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Re: Anyone remember a SIMM-based hardware project
« Reply #6 on: February 15, 2021, 11:02:23 pm »
yes there are lot of people trying to promote this sort of idea.   It might be a good idea but there really needs to be a standard.   The Arduino and Raspberry PI form factors have become defacto standards with wide adoption, but I'm not sure anybody leads in the SIMM world.   Sadly the Arduino and PI formats never appeared to be well thought out to me.

My first thought also was the Dontronix module.

When I type in a simple search I get lots of results from multiple manufacturers:
https://www.startpage.com/row/search?q=som+simm+module&l=english
Well, I'd expect SIMM designs to be going the way of the dodo, since SIMM memory became obsolete in the mid-1990s. 30-pin SIMM was obsolete by around 1990 and you can't readily get sockets any more. (72-pin SIMM is still available.)
 

Offline wizard69

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Re: Anyone remember a SIMM-based hardware project
« Reply #7 on: February 22, 2021, 05:59:54 pm »
yes there are lot of people trying to promote this sort of idea.   It might be a good idea but there really needs to be a standard.   The Arduino and Raspberry PI form factors have become defacto standards with wide adoption, but I'm not sure anybody leads in the SIMM world.   Sadly the Arduino and PI formats never appeared to be well thought out to me.

My first thought also was the Dontronix module.

When I type in a simple search I get lots of results from multiple manufacturers:
https://www.startpage.com/row/search?q=som+simm+module&l=english
Well, I'd expect SIMM designs to be going the way of the dodo, since SIMM memory became obsolete in the mid-1990s. 30-pin SIMM was obsolete by around 1990 and you can't readily get sockets any more. (72-pin SIMM is still available.)

It does make you wonder why anybody would use a function specific card edge connector for a general purpose backplane.   It isn't like the catalogs are not filled with more generic card edge connectors or header type connectors.   
 


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