Author Topic: Intel open source hardware  (Read 7031 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline 4to20Milliamps

  • Regular Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 248
  • Country: us
Intel open source hardware
« on: August 01, 2013, 01:25:57 am »
I did several searches and didn't see this posted anywhere:

 

Offline GeoffS

  • Supporter
  • ****
  • Posts: 1267
  • Country: au
Re: Intel open source hardware
« Reply #1 on: August 01, 2013, 02:38:08 am »
Not cheap though at around $250.
 

Offline 4to20Milliamps

  • Regular Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 248
  • Country: us
Re: Intel open source hardware
« Reply #2 on: August 01, 2013, 03:01:10 am »
Especially compared to a raspberry pi, they're a bit late getting into the hobby stuff, it must be a big enough market to be drawing their attention though.
 

Offline amyk

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 6616
Re: Intel open source hardware
« Reply #3 on: August 01, 2013, 06:43:00 am »
Unfortunately besides the price it's also not quite feature-complete to make it PC-compatible, which may have been their original goal - if it was, it would be a lot more attractive. The CPU is $54 and the chipset is $9. If it's open-souce I can see the Chinese getting copies out for far less than $250.

Only 12 GPIO is rather dismal; many of the other chipsets have several dozen.

At least datasheets for the devices are available, unlike the Pi...

EDIT: AMD GizmoBoard might be what they're competing against at that price point, but that one is supposed to be PC-compatible enough to run Windows.
« Last Edit: August 01, 2013, 06:55:42 am by amyk »
 

Offline mickpah

  • Regular Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 148
  • Country: au
    • Yeti Hacks
Re: Intel open source hardware
« Reply #4 on: August 01, 2013, 06:59:38 am »
I can't see any innovative or attractive about this - simply a me too product hoping on the bandwagon
even the naming is lame. lure=shield=cape=boosterpack

aside from raspberry pi, beagle bone there is now also the cubieboard V2
http://www.seeedstudio.com/depot/cubieboard-a20-p-1553.html

The only thing that would get me close to buying the intel is a 50% drop in price and a second network interface for a cheap home/firewall router and PCengines have been doing this for years http://pcengines.ch/alix.htm (processors getting a bit long in the tooth though)

 

Offline mickpah

  • Regular Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 148
  • Country: au
    • Yeti Hacks
Re: Intel open source hardware
« Reply #5 on: August 01, 2013, 07:05:15 am »
I can't see any innovative or attractive about this - simply a me too product hopping on the bandwagon
even the naming is lame. lure=shield=cape=boosterpack

aside from raspberry pi, beagle bone there is now also the cubieboard V2
http://www.seeedstudio.com/depot/cubieboard-a20-p-1553.html

The only thing that would get me close to buying the intel is a 50% drop in price and a second network interface for a cheap home/firewall router and PCengines have been doing this for years http://pcengines.ch/alix.htm (processors getting a bit long in the tooth though)
 

Offline DutchGert

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 257
  • Country: nl
Re: Intel open source hardware
« Reply #6 on: September 16, 2013, 08:14:05 am »
Lol, gues what I am working on right now, an industrial HMI based on exactly the same processor and companion chips.

This is a very powerfull platform, much more powerfull than the Raspberry or even the Beagleboard. Also, this thing is fully x86 so running any type of Windows based OS is a easy.

This could be a lot better alternative for lets say a NAS or mediaplayer than one of the above solutions.
 

Offline amyk

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 6616
Re: Intel open source hardware
« Reply #7 on: September 16, 2013, 11:37:36 am »
Also, this thing is fully x86 so running any type of Windows based OS is a easy.
Has it been done? From my understanding and a glance over the datasheets it seems to not be 100% PC compatible.
 

Offline DutchGert

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 257
  • Country: nl
Re: Intel open source hardware
« Reply #8 on: September 16, 2013, 02:03:37 pm »
Also, this thing is fully x86 so running any type of Windows based OS is a easy.
Has it been done? From my understanding and a glance over the datasheets it seems to not be 100% PC compatible.

Over here we are able to run WinXP, Windows 7, DOS, and Linux on a E640/EG20T combo. The customer will get WEC7 installed with custom software from the company I work for.
« Last Edit: September 16, 2013, 02:13:36 pm by DutchGert »
 

Offline free_electron

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 7304
  • Country: us
    • SiliconValleyGarage
Re: Intel open source hardware
« Reply #9 on: September 16, 2013, 02:44:26 pm »
Take a look at the intel NUC family.
Starting at 139$ you have a full blown computer in a box, ready to run.
Has nice enclosure and you can have up to quad core cpus(pricier of course)

Professional Electron Wrangler.
Any comments, or points of view expressed, are my own and not endorsed , induced or compensated by my employer(s).
 

Offline amyk

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 6616
Re: Intel open source hardware
« Reply #10 on: September 19, 2013, 11:19:13 am »
Over here we are able to run WinXP, Windows 7, DOS, and Linux on a E640/EG20T combo. The customer will get WEC7 installed with custom software from the company I work for.
I'm guessing that system also had a Super I/O? This board doesn't have one.
 

Offline DutchGert

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 257
  • Country: nl
Re: Intel open source hardware
« Reply #11 on: September 19, 2013, 11:21:51 am »
Over here we are able to run WinXP, Windows 7, DOS, and Linux on a E640/EG20T combo. The customer will get WEC7 installed with custom software from the company I work for.
I'm guessing that system also had a Super I/O? This board doesn't have one.

Correct
 

Offline westfw

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 3123
  • Country: us
Re: Intel open source hardware
« Reply #12 on: September 19, 2013, 04:08:55 pm »
The last time I used some Intel hardware, it's documentation came in a series of databooks that were color-coded as to their level of secrecy.  Yellow-covered books you could get by agreeing never to let them out of your office, and to destroy them when you were done.  Orange-covered books were supposed to be kept under lock and key, and returned to Intel when you were done.  Red-covered books (I don't think I got to see a red covered book) could only be looked at if you were being supervised by an Intel employee.  (Something like this, anyway.  Fierce!)  BIOS-writers would need access to all of those.  I was writing bare-metal code on a production motherboard that had already be set up by a third-party BIOS, so I got away with mostly yellow books.

If this "open source" board of theirs can be programmed from the ground up without having to to go to such non-disclosure extemes, then it's a pretty major improvement, IMO!
 

Offline fudgebobs

  • Contributor
  • Posts: 13
  • Country: ca
  • The geek shall inherit the Earth
Re: Intel open source hardware
« Reply #13 on: October 08, 2013, 08:09:18 pm »
Seems like it would be a good buy if the cost was only lower. Personally though, I would much prefer this to the Raspberry Pi. I do have a Pi, and I have custom software running on it for media streaming, and it does tend to struggle. I think Intel has the right idea here but need to price it a bit better. I mean I am sure Intel can afford to take a little hit on their profit margins.

 :-+
 


Share me

Digg  Facebook  SlashDot  Delicious  Technorati  Twitter  Google  Yahoo
Smf