EEVblog Electronics Community Forum

EEVblog => Other Blogs => Topic started by: johnlsenchak on June 19, 2019, 11:00:47 am

Title: [Restoration]- 1960's Multimeter! Sentinel ME-26D/U
Post by: johnlsenchak on June 19, 2019, 11:00:47 am
[Restoration]- 1960's Multimeter! Sentinel ME-26D/U
Mr Carlson's Lab
Published on Jun 18, 2019
Sharing more electronic knowledge! Here is a ton of information about electronic repair, restoration, and alignment. See the Carlson Low Voltage Leakage Tester in a comparison test too. Also.. See the "NEW" Carlson Non Contact Signal Injection Probe in action as well. Lots of info here... Enjoy!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aWgdyoJsVnI (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aWgdyoJsVnI)

Posted   06/19/2019
Title: Re: [Restoration]- 1960's Multimeter! Sentinel ME-26D/U
Post by: Dr. Frank on June 20, 2019, 03:49:11 pm
Mr. Carlson delivers very polished videos, which I usually really appreciate, as he has a lot of knowledge about vacuum tube devices.

But he also polishes the YT comments, i.e. he blanks / censors unwanted negative comments. This I really dislike.

So here is a copy of my three times blanked out comment about his latest repair video, in which he really has very little clue about the subject.

'Sorry, that repair / DC range calibration was not done  in a qualified manner.
E.g., it was not necessary at all to replace that nominal 22M, 10% resistor inside the DC probe, as its drift is exactly compensated by  this 1V range trimmer alignment. In fact its value or its drift has practically no influence on either DCV range. This is evident, because the change from 26 to 22 MOhm did not change the alignment of the 1V range at all.
Also, the replacement of the other range resistors could have been done in a more clever way, e.g. it is necessary to trim only one resistor to get this upper 68.3M resistor, instead of replacing both. It's missing also the important information, which type of resistors you've used as replacement. So did you use modern 1% thin film resistors, or crappy/unstable carbon resistors out of your junk box?
Back then, in the Airforce cal lab, I repaired lots and lots of these hp410Bs, so I really can't appreciate your repair methods.'
Title: Re: [Restoration]- 1960's Multimeter! Sentinel ME-26D/U
Post by: johnlsenchak on June 20, 2019, 05:12:16 pm
Mr. Carlson delivers very polished videos, which I usually really appreciate, as he has a lot of knowledge about vacuum tube devices.

But he also polishes the YT comments, i.e. he blanks / censors unwanted negative comments. This I really dislike.

So here is a copy of my three times blanked out comment about his latest repair video, in which he really has very little clue about the subject.



Unfortunately, most but not all  Youtube  Content  Creator  are doing this  because their is a huge  amount  of negativity  within the comment  sections  To  much  negative  or childish   crap and not enough constructive  comments    I  think  Mr Carson   talks  way to much and should edit down his videos  for time. Two hours  is way to long  for a  video because people now and days  don't have  the attention  span
Title: Re: [Restoration]- 1960's Multimeter! Sentinel ME-26D/U
Post by: schmitt trigger on June 20, 2019, 05:29:04 pm
+1 What John said.

The modern man's disease is the lack of time. When we  have some free time in which we would like to be entertained, while simultaneously learning a little bit (a weird activity that us engineers like to do), we seldom have the luxury of watching an hour-long or more video.

That is the reason I like Dave video's so much. A little introductory banter and then he dives right in, and limiting the video between 20 to 30 minutes. If the topic is extensive, then he can always do a part 2 video.
Title: Re: [Restoration]- 1960's Multimeter! Sentinel ME-26D/U
Post by: chris_leyson on June 20, 2019, 05:52:57 pm
It was an interesting repair video but way too long and I think 25% of it was devoted to advertising his Patrion channel and his capacitor leakage tester. EDIT: It can't be too difficult making the leakage current sense resistors an order or two larger in magnitude to increase the sensitivity.
Title: Re: [Restoration]- 1960's Multimeter! Sentinel ME-26D/U
Post by: johnlsenchak on June 20, 2019, 06:26:10 pm

That is the reason I like Dave video's so much. A little introductory banter and then he dives right in, and limiting the video between 20 to 30 minutes. If the topic is extensive, then he can always do a part 2 video.

Dave  has a  lot of intelligence ,integrity, and opinion I've been watching his  videos  for years now.     
Title: Re: [Restoration]- 1960's Multimeter! Sentinel ME-26D/U
Post by: seaferring on May 17, 2021, 02:12:27 pm
Late to this topic, but I just don't understand the sentiment expressed.

1. perhaps your comment was deleted because of your aggressive tone: "so I really can't appreciate your repair methods." is pretty harsh - Mr Carlson spends a huge amount of time producing content and perhaps if you had have posted your correction or disagreement in a more respectful way he might have spent time responding to you.

2. Both Mr Carlson's Lab and eevblog are educational channels - they are both attempting to achieve the same goals, perhaps in different ways, but they are not in competition and should not be pitted against each other.

3. I, and I'm sure many other people, appreciate long videos that don't pander to the YouTube algorithm's insistence on videos of a certain length. Whether people have short attention spans these days can be argued, but that YouTube and their ridiculous metrics forces this on content creators is very problematic. If a video is too long for you don't watch it. If a video contains content I am interested in, especially repair content, then I prefer length over brevity. This is pretty simple stuff.

4. If I think the content creator is talking too much about a given point, I can fast forward through that part.

Let's try to respect and appreciate content creators who produce content that is not tailored to the almighty algorithm...