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Video Teardown & Experiements with LeCroy's 100GHz, 240GS/s Scope

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coppice:

--- Quote from: electr_peter on February 13, 2015, 11:51:14 am ---
--- Quote ---They make a 100GHz oscilloscope because that's what the optical people (who are the main market) want. If the optical people say they need 200GHz or 300GHz and have the budget, LeCroy should have no problems extending the current design to those bandwidths. Beyond 300GHz  or so life starts to get more interesting. :-)

--- End quote ---
100 GHz version is made because they can do it, they need to compete and innovate, it is needed for industry and research applications. I have no doubts that slightly higher BW version can be made with similar architecture, but it will be more and more difficult for them because of front end limitations.

Do you think they can make 200 GHz scope by using two 100 GHz scopes and using similar frequency splitting technique? I don't think it is possible now, more R&D is needed to boost front end BW.

--- End quote ---
Making these things is not an intellectual game. Its a business. You make what people want. If you can't make enough of them to cover costs you don't go ahead. Many research prototypes don't move on to full development because the market is too small. If enough people with enough money have a strong need you make them an instrument. If you can't make exactly what they want you get the result they need by a more circuitous route. Right now the market and the development cost of a 200GHz aren't matching up or LeCroy would have a 200GHz instrument. External connections are certainly going to be tough, and the approach they use now isn't rated for 200GHz , but they'd find something if the market were there. From work we did in the 80s, I suspect 300GHz is about where you'd start scratching your head.

vaualbus:

--- Quote from: coppice on February 14, 2015, 05:42:38 pm ---
--- Quote from: electr_peter on February 13, 2015, 11:51:14 am ---
--- Quote ---They make a 100GHz oscilloscope because that's what the optical people (who are the main market) want. If the optical people say they need 200GHz or 300GHz and have the budget, LeCroy should have no problems extending the current design to those bandwidths. Beyond 300GHz  or so life starts to get more interesting. :-)

--- End quote ---
100 GHz version is made because they can do it, they need to compete and innovate, it is needed for industry and research applications. I have no doubts that slightly higher BW version can be made with similar architecture, but it will be more and more difficult for them because of front end limitations.

Do you think they can make 200 GHz scope by using two 100 GHz scopes and using similar frequency splitting technique? I don't think it is possible now, more R&D is needed to boost front end BW.

--- End quote ---
Making these things is not an intellectual game. Its a business. You make what people want. If you can't make enough of them to cover costs you don't go ahead. Many research prototypes don't move on to full development because the market is too small. If enough people with enough money have a strong need you make them an instrument. If you can't make exactly what they want you get the result they need by a more circuitous route. Right now the market and the development cost of a 200GHz aren't matching up or LeCroy would have a 200GHz instrument. External connections are certainly going to be tough, and the approach they use now isn't rated for 200GHz , but they'd find something if the market were there. From work we did in the 80s, I suspect 300GHz is about where you'd start scratching your head.

--- End quote ---

There is also physics problem. You can't build a such frequency scope becuase there are no connectors type for that frequency and also there no use for them. I think personally that the end for scope is near I think that a 200ghz will never released.

Lukas:
I'm wondering when you really need 100GHz real time bandwidth. All in the experiments in the video could have been done using a sampling scope. Although not has convenient since you'd have to provide a trigger source.

w2aew:

--- Quote from: Lukas on February 15, 2015, 12:59:40 am ---I'm wondering when you really need 100GHz real time bandwidth. All in the experiments in the video could have been done using a sampling scope. Although not has convenient since you'd have to provide a trigger source.

--- End quote ---

One key application would be coherent optical signal analysis, where the quadrature components of multiple optical polarizations need to be simultaneously captured and analyzed. Another potential application is vector signal analysis of Wideband RF signals in the 60/70/90Ghz bands.

mikeselectricstuff:

--- Quote from: 3roomlab on February 15, 2015, 08:01:11 am ---i have a suggestion ... not sure if it will breach secrets of making PCB ...  :-//

i saw youtube 4 layer PCB how they make it (eurocircuits) ...

any chance of a factory tour that takes us to see these 28 layer PCB fabs ? and some kind of similar narrative about how they do it?  :-+ ... maybe some PCB fab will offer to show on EEVblog ?

--- End quote ---
Just watch the 4 layer video 7 times  ;D

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