Products > Programming

old book with examples in PL/I: will a C-guy understand them?

(1/29) > >>

DiTBho:
Talking about procedural languages, I usually write programs in C89/99.

For Xmas, a friend of mine sent me an old yellowish big book with more than 700 pages entirely typeset using "troff" on the Unix operating system (WOW, seriously WOW!!!), it was printed in 1977 and it uses examples from programming languages such as FORTRAN (10%), Algol (10%), PL/I (80%), programming language.

Never heard before, according to Google, PL/I is a very ancient language, older than C

PL/I: 1964->concept, 1969->implementation, by IBM
K&R C: 1972, concept,implementation, by Dennis Ritchie

Will I understand them? How much PL/I is different from K&R C?  :o

SiliconWizard:
I suppose you have taken a look at this? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PL/I

It sure is very different. But still procedural.
As to whether you'll understand code at first sight? You'll tell us.

retiredfeline:
You can probably figure it out, once you get past the prolixity, the uppercase, and the fact that there are no reserved words. Why would you want to though, you can get algorithm examples in more recent languages.

I think I last wrote a PL/1 program for a Univac 1108, just out of curiosity. I don't think anybody else used it, everybody used FORTRAN on that mainframe. I think I was interested in being able to write recursive functions.

However troff is still very much alive, as groff and still used for man pages.

IanB:
I played with PL/I a bit when I was at university (when it was still a "living" language). This was on a Multics system, which was kind of built around PL/I. Multics inspired Unix. You could say that PL/I is to Multics as C is to Unix.

It is just a procedural language, like C, or Algol, or Pascal, or anything similar. Nothing really oddball about it.

It's claim to fame was its attempt to solve all programming problems, from mathematics to accounting. As such, it tried to combine the capabilities of Algol, Fortran and Cobol in one environment, and therefore to be the last ever programming language that anyone would need. (RIP, PL/I  :) )

But yes, you should understand the examples in the book quite easily.

DiTBho:

--- Quote from: retiredfeline on December 28, 2021, 12:33:25 am ---Why would you want to though, you can get algorithm examples in more recent languages

--- End quote ---

yeah, just for the challenge, and just because the book is a gift  :D
(also, because despite being old, the book is a kind of saint gold bible
modern version of that books exist, but cost a fortune (>>180 euro))


--- Quote from: retiredfeline on December 28, 2021, 12:33:25 am ---troff is still very much alive, as groff and still used for man pages.

--- End quote ---

Yup  :D

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

There was an error while thanking
Thanking...
Go to full version