Electronics > Projects, Designs, and Technical Stuff

Building an oscilloscope

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rstofer:
Read everything you can find about the Digilent Analog Discovery 2 - it isn't especially fast (30 MHz) but it works real well.

https://digilent.com/reference/test-and-measurement/analog-discovery-2/start?redirect=1

There's an Open Oscillocope project

https://www.eevblog.com/forum/testgear/a-high-performance-open-source-oscilloscope-development-log-future-ideas/

Considering the price of a 'real' scope, I wouldn't even consider such a project.  Just looking at that PCB makes my head spin.  My time is worth $<pick a number> and there's no way I could have it working in $349 worth.

rstofer:
I wonder how far you could get with a 600 MHz Teensy 4.1.  No, it won't sample a single ADC at 1 GHz but it's still pretty quick and suitable for bare hardware programming.

https://www.pjrc.com/store/teensy41.html

nigelwright7557:
I have designed a few low cost USB PC scopes.
From systems with A2D inside  PIC microcontroller to a PIC microcontroller with external 20MHZ A2D.
The beauty of the PIC is reading A2D and performing trigger modes before taking in data.

For the speed your looking at the FPGA is the only way to go I can think of.
Its not only just acquiring data but doing the trigger modes too, no trigger, positive going trigger and negative going trigger.
Your micro will look after USB interface.

The PC side is a project on its own having to deal with data acquisition via USB.
Resizing plots to fit the users screen. X shift. X + Y channel adding mode. Plot up and down shifting.
Coping with different voltage range inputs.

I also added a spectrum analyser screen. I had a struggle finding a FFT routine that worked well.
I think I tried 5 before I got one that gave acceptable results.

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