Author Topic: Coin cell performance in low temperatures  (Read 862 times)

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Offline electr_peter

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Coin cell performance in low temperatures
« on: September 22, 2019, 07:22:02 pm »
Hi,

I have experienced multiple times failure of coin cell batteries to perform in low temperatures. Several times in a wrist watch (MSP430 based with radio), another time in garage door opener (868MHz type). I am wondering about coin cells limitations for such radio products (as burst of power are required for radio).

Coin cells in question are CR2032 lithium cells from reputable brands.
By low temperatures I mean +8 - +12 C or lower. Failing to perform at such temperatures with moderately used battery is strange IMHO.

I am looking for better data on button cells to add to current anecdotal experiences.
  • How does temperature affect CR2032 lithium cells? How does internal resistance and current capacity change with temperature? Is there a sharp drop off at discussed range?
  • Does cold accelerate aging of battery? Would keeping the battery (and device) warm help in the long run (w.r.t. battery life)?
« Last Edit: September 27, 2019, 10:45:20 pm by electr_peter »
 

Offline ahbushnell

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Re: Coin cell performance in low temperatures
« Reply #1 on: September 23, 2019, 02:07:55 am »
 

Offline electr_peter

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Re: Coin cell performance in low temperatures
« Reply #2 on: September 25, 2019, 08:15:03 pm »
ahbushnell, thanks for a link. Document states that at 0C chemical reactions slow down and voltage drops (as well as capacity). Cycling effect from low to high temps are not described - I suppose there are no significant long lasting effects.
In CR2032 cell datasheet http://data.energizer.com/pdfs/cr2032.pdf operating temp range is -30 to 60C. I guess this means only that battery is somewhat operational and is not damaged in this range.

So I just need
  • a) change my batteries more often to new ones in the remote control
  • b) keep remote control in warm place to keep it working
« Last Edit: September 25, 2019, 08:16:49 pm by electr_peter »
 

Offline ahbushnell

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Re: Coin cell performance in low temperatures
« Reply #3 on: September 26, 2019, 12:12:39 am »
Good luck!
 

Offline Seekonk

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Re: Coin cell performance in low temperatures
« Reply #4 on: September 26, 2019, 02:14:22 pm »
There was a discussion about coin cell capacity and how many just out of factory looking packaging are fake with limited life. Energizer was the example. An interesting suggestion was to buy no name cells.  I use them to monitor a fridge at 2C with no problem. 
 

Offline electr_peter

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Re: Coin cell performance in low temperatures
« Reply #5 on: September 30, 2019, 09:12:34 pm »
Seekonk, I think you are referencing discussion in https://www.eevblog.com/forum/dodgy-technology/crap-energizer-2032-batteries-from-amazon/
I my case batteries just failed at low temp after few months of low usage (not immediately like in a link above).
 

Offline Apollyon25_

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Re: Coin cell performance in low temperatures
« Reply #6 on: November 28, 2019, 02:30:06 am »
I've used Renata lithium primary coin cells before.
I provided Renata with the load profile of our system and they came back with a vs. temperature lifetime.
Most manufacturers probably can advise you (if it's not described by datasheet curves)
 

Offline I wanted a rude username

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Re: Coin cell performance in low temperatures
« Reply #7 on: November 28, 2019, 04:22:28 am »
Cold temperatures are better for primary cell storage ... but when you draw 1 mAh from a cold cell, it will be like drawing > 1 mAh from a room-temperature cell. Its internal resistance will be higher, so the voltage will be lower and more power will go into heating the cell.

If you have any control over device design, you can do at least two simple things:
  • Spec a cell with a larger diameter. A CR3032 can deliver about 2.5 times the power of a CR2032. And CR16xx cells are rubbish.
  • Install an appropriately sized ceramic capacitor in parallel with the cell. Peaky loads like radios with too small or no capacitor ruin cells. There's a white paper about this but I can't find it now.
 


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