Author Topic: Components you wish existed.  (Read 38583 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Galenbo

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 1473
  • Country: be
Components you wish existed.
« on: May 11, 2017, 05:51:46 pm »
I'm sure everybody looked for a component, but turns out it doesn't exist.

My latest one: 8-bit Optocoupler Isolator in DIP package.

what's yours?
If you try and take a cat apart to see how it works, the first thing you have on your hands is a nonworking cat.
 

Offline babysitter

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 804
  • Country: de
  • pushing silicon at work
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #1 on: May 11, 2017, 06:00:28 pm »
programmable emc filter. just aquire a emission peak list and upload into its nvm...
I'm not a feature, I'm a bug! ARC DG3HDA
 

Offline Siwastaja

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 2012
  • Country: fi
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #2 on: May 11, 2017, 06:08:34 pm »
Affordable and simple current-mode synchronous buck DC/DC controller IC with current limit, doesn't need to be exact or even adjustable, but it should work as a CC-CV battery charging circuit. In other words, something that exists as hundreds of sub $1 products from every manufacturer, but with one unwanted feature (fault or hickup mode) removed.

(LM25117 was finally found and does the job, but I wish the possibility to disable fault/hickup mode was more commonplace in controller topologies where running at the limit poses no issue whatsoever.)

 
The following users thanked this post: MagicSmoker

Offline w2aew

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 1735
  • Country: us
  • I usTa cuDnt speL enjinere, noW I aR wuN
    • My YouTube Channel
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #3 on: May 11, 2017, 06:11:01 pm »
Here's a list I wrote up about 30 years ago, over a couple of beers with colleagues.  Almost on topic - though this list is really for the "Ultimate Analog EE Toolkit".  Still true today...

TUB OF MARGIN: Just add a scoop to your latest design wherever you need some additional margin. Available in four popular flavors: Gain Margin, Phase Margin, and the Neapolitan varieties of Design and Specification Margin.

MILLER KILLER SPRAY: Has that nasty Miller Effect killed the performance of your latest high-speed common emitter/source amplifier design? Give it a shot of this spray and watch your bandwidth return. It's cheaper than a cascode!

ANTI-NOISE FOAM: Quiet down your next design with the special blend of flicker antigens and shot dampeners in a light, foamy anti-Johnson base. It'll do wonders for your noise figure!

PARASITIC PESTICIDE: Scare away those annoying puffs of capacitance, nanohenries of lead inductance, stray leakage paths, etc. After all, you didn't design your circuit with them in mind, so why should you have to deal with them?

IDEAL CREAM: A favorite amongst most designers. Want an ideal diode? Rub a little cream over that 1N4004 or 1N914! Works on most any type of component. But, remember to use it sparingly, you still have to interface to the "real world".

BOX OF dBs: What design couldn't use a couple of extra dBs of supply rejection? Grab a handful whenever you need some more CMRR, gain, dynamic range, etc. For a limited time, your box will also include some -dBs to instantly give you better gain flatness, ideal filter responses, and harmonic suppression.

GAD SYSTEM: That's right, a real complete GAD system (graphite aided design). This system, known as the No. 2, is a slender yellow instrument. The "insert/add" mode is accomplished with the re-sharpenable end, and the "delete" mode is handled by the flexible orange end of the tool. Completely portable and very lightweight - uses no batteries!

TABLE OF UNIVERSAL FUDGE FACTORS: Can't seem to make your numbers match or your equations mesh? Fuss no more! Our universal fudge factors will make any data correlate and any relationship believable.

TOLERANCE TRIMMING TOOLS: Use these special tools to trim out the tolerance of any component in your design. Don't pay for expensive 0.1% components ever again!

MANAGEMENT REPELLENT: Do you find it hard to concentrate with your boss breathing down your neck? This formula is guaranteed to keep away the brass so you can get some real work done! Available as a hanging strip or a lab fogger.

DEADLINE SOLVENT: Don't let unrealistic project schedules stress you out. A drop or two of this powerful solvent will relieve you of the worries of late deliveries, fab shutdowns, vendor delays, and unexpected design problems.
======================================
YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/w2aew
FAE for Tektronix
 

Online BrianHG

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 2961
  • Country: ca
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #4 on: May 11, 2017, 06:11:41 pm »
Matched power N-Channel and P-Channel J-Fets.  Like, at least 10 amps.  These stop being made back in the 1970's.
__________
BrianHG.
 

Online Ian.M

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 8013
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #5 on: May 11, 2017, 06:18:19 pm »
TO-92 and/or SOT-23 100V Vds J-FETs, binned by Idss, also available as matched complimentary part numbers.
 

Offline alexanderbrevig

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 583
  • Country: no
  • Musician, programmer and EE hobbyist
    • alexanderbrevig.com
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #6 on: May 11, 2017, 06:49:32 pm »
This is mine, a 3-way net selector 0R jumper. Would make some of my variants easier. In a perfect world I'd want 0805, 0603 and 0402 sizes.
Sorry for my crude drawing:

Offline Conrad Hoffman

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 1125
  • Country: us
    • The Messy Basement
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #7 on: May 11, 2017, 06:59:06 pm »
Vacuum thermistors for oscillator stabilization. They used to exist and weren't too expensive, but now unobtainium. Last I saw were the Bowthorpe or NTC RA series. Lots of data sheets out there, but nobody seems to have actual parts.
 

Online Ian.M

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 8013
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #8 on: May 11, 2017, 07:01:28 pm »
This is mine, a 3-way net selector 0R jumper. Would make some of my variants easier. In a perfect world I'd want 0805, 0603 and 0402 sizes.
If you fudge the pad in the footprint slightly by extending them outwards to accommodate the fact that SOT-23 and similar package leg centers don't quite make an equilateral triangle, you can do that: http://www.topline.tv/SOT_jumper.html
 
The following users thanked this post: BrianHG

Offline GeorgeOfTheJungle

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 1816
  • Country: pl
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #9 on: May 11, 2017, 07:08:39 pm »
Electrolytics that don't dry up. Or a syringe to wet them again when they do.
And a decent gas soldering iron.
« Last Edit: May 12, 2017, 05:07:28 am by GeorgeOfTheJungle »
 #include <unistd.h>
 int main (void) { while (1) fork(); }
 

Offline NivagSwerdna

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 1759
  • Country: gb
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #10 on: May 11, 2017, 07:12:54 pm »
5mm LEDs with built in resistors.
 

Offline Codebird

  • Regular Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 161
  • Country: gb
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #11 on: May 11, 2017, 07:18:47 pm »
A four pin device.
One pin is ground.
One is +3.3 or +5V.
One pin is an analog input.
One pin is the PWM output, duty proportional to the input voltage over the supply voltage.

For all your variable speed and brightness needs. With variations from 100Hz to 600KHz.

---

Also a thing with a 30Ms/s ADC on one side, and a USB2.0 interface on the other, that doesn't cost a fortune. Because if you want to do video capture, all the rest is software. 12 bits minimum.
 

Offline james_s

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 9270
  • Country: us
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #12 on: May 11, 2017, 07:25:02 pm »
RGB laser diode, a single can with all 3 emitters, aligned such that a whitelight beam is possible via a single set of optics.
 

Online AndyC_772

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 3446
  • Country: gb
  • Professional design engineer
    • Cawte Engineering | Reliable Electronics
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #13 on: May 11, 2017, 07:27:18 pm »
5mm LEDs with built in resistors.
http://uk.farnell.com/multicomp/mcl053had-12/led-5mm-2v-36-orange/dp/1581228

A four pin device.
One pin is ground.
One is +3.3 or +5V.
One pin is an analog input.
One pin is the PWM output, duty proportional to the input voltage over the supply voltage.

For all your variable speed and brightness needs. With variations from 100Hz to 600KHz.

Sounds exactly what the smallest PICs and similar micros are designed for.
 
The following users thanked this post: uwezi

Online Ian.M

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 8013
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #14 on: May 11, 2017, 07:35:52 pm »
A four pin device.
.....
For all your variable speed and brightness needs. With variations from 100Hz to 600KHz.
Sounds exactly what the smallest PICs and similar micros are designed for.
Yep.  Apart from the fact its SOT23-6 you've just described a PIC10F320 or 322. + some code.  Up to 62.5KHz use a PWM module, above that use the NCO in pulse frequency mode + diddle with the pulse width.
 

Offline FlyingHacker

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 799
  • Country: us
  • You're Doing it Wrong
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #15 on: May 11, 2017, 07:37:35 pm »
An Ideal OpAmp with +/- infinite output voltage, and no need for decoupling.
--73
 
The following users thanked this post: uwezi

Online mariush

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 3767
  • Country: ro
  • .
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #16 on: May 11, 2017, 07:46:15 pm »
Two Y class capacitors in a single package, DIP or something similar, instead of the classic blue "teardrop" style. Make them use less space by having them one on top of the other. I image they would take slightly less space on a circuit board and they would be easier to pick and place.

Same for X class capacitors.  I would like to see a manufacturer making a package containing 2 X class capacitors stacked vertically. Maybe even 2 x capacitors and 2-4 y capacitors in a package.
Basically,  most ATX power supplies have these components taking a lot of room and I feel there could be some better use of vertical space.
 
I'd like to see more switching regulators available with built in inductors and diodes and ceramic capacitors.. in DIP or soic or something like that. Basically just add input and output capacitors and you're done.  Linear has a bunch of them but they're mostly BGA or similar packages and cost a lot (15$+). Don't see why it would be so hard to make cheap ones with just vin , vout and maybe adjusting output voltage using a resistor.
 
Switching regulators that can have a default output voltage but can be reconfigured through some 1-wire or spi  / i2c to output another voltage and/or enabled/disabled and maybe optionally report back the current used if there's a current sense resistor added.
 
CHEAP e-ink or grayscale LCD (transflexive or with backlight) with maybe 2/4/8/16 gray levels and 16:9 16:10   (like 320 x 160-240 , 480x360, 640x360) , ideally with some memory built in and the possibility of uploading a bunch of 8x8 sprites/bitmap fonts to reduce the communication between a microcontroller and the display.. BUT still keeping communication simple using SPI or i2c  or at most 8bit parallel

Basically something in-between the ancient 2x16-20 or 4x16-20 character parallel connections and downright 16-24bit color lcds that require sending 3 bytes at a time for each pixel or require flat flex connectors.

I'm too lazy to research .. is there a particular reason why the common mode chokes in computer power supplies have to be round? Could they maybe make them use less space but have the same technical capabilities by making hexagon shape or some other shape instead of round ferrite ring. 

I was thinking..  lots of power supplies have 2 y caps. common mode choke, x2 caps , sometimes another common mode choke, another pair of y caps. Why not have one or two round chokes stacked vertically, put two y caps in the center of (each) choke and arrange the wires in a nice format at the bottom and then put everything in some potting compound or some plastic case.

With hundreds of thousands of power supplies manufactured I would think the investment in some innovation in this area would be worth it.
 

Offline rdl

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 2670
  • Country: us
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #17 on: May 11, 2017, 07:49:04 pm »
5mm LEDs with built in resistors.

Mouser stocks several types of these here in the US. The trick to finding them is to search for forward voltages of 5 and 12 volts. I keep a bunch of these because they're very useful for breadboarding. The only problem is telling them apart from regular LEDs, and which voltage they are for, when they get separated from the original packaging.

edit: http://www.mouser.com/Optoelectronics/LED-Indication/Standard-LEDs-Through-Hole/_/N-b1jdvZscv7?P=1yox9hxZ1yox9d6
 

Offline CJay

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 3321
  • Country: gb
  • M0UAW
M0UAW
 

Offline Roeland_R

  • Regular Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 60
  • Country: nl
Components you wish existed.
« Reply #19 on: May 11, 2017, 08:04:06 pm »
Fluxcapacitor
 

Online BrianHG

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 2961
  • Country: ca
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #20 on: May 11, 2017, 08:12:04 pm »
Solder paste with the consistency of bubble-gum.
__________
BrianHG.
 

Offline james_s

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 9270
  • Country: us
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #21 on: May 11, 2017, 08:14:20 pm »
Fluxcapacitor

But where are you gonna get the 1.21 gigawatts of electricity?!
 

Online mariush

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 3767
  • Country: ro
  • .
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #22 on: May 11, 2017, 08:21:47 pm »
Oh..  would be nice to have a CHEAP (<10$)  all-in-one video card IC , let's say with only only LVDS or displayport (so you don't pay royalties for hdmi), with 2D only so it won't use a lot of power and 1366x768 60hz or 1080p 30/60hz (make it with a 8 MB / 16 MB / 32 MB sram/sdram/ddram buffer integrated in the chip, shoudn't be that hard since there's already ssd controllers with so much ram built in).

Shouldn't be hard to make a chip powered from a single 5v (only saying it because displayport connectors already have 5v in it) and/or maybe 3.3v-3.6v power supply and some simple input (spi/i2c/parallel 8bit/16bit etc).

Make it simple .. just initialize and configure the resolution and bpp (let's say 8bit / 16 bit / 24 bit / 32bit which defines the frame buffer size and number of frames in buffer) and then the chip could do it all without communication from processor, microcontroller, no hand-holding. Make it possible to write directly to the onboard memory in one of the frames in the buffer (and/or have some commands to be able overlay text, print text etc over what's there already), some basic commands to flip between frame buffers (for vsync and so you won't have screen tears, purposes etc) and then the graphics card converts the memory buffer to displayport/lvds output.

Would be awesome if it had maybe some very basic overlay support and hardware decoder support for some h264 or something like that. Doesn't have to be any h264 profile possible, could be just basic / lightweight h264 profile (let's say max 720p 2-3 mbps), to save transistors and memory and power. Basically, so you could tell the card to overlay a 640x360 h264 stream somewhere and then the microcontroller can push data into the chip through a 8bit to 32bit connection.. let's say videos with maximum 1 mbps bitrate and have the video card do the hard part.
 
« Last Edit: May 11, 2017, 08:29:01 pm by mariush »
 

Online BrianHG

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 2961
  • Country: ca
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #23 on: May 11, 2017, 08:32:05 pm »
Fluxcapacitor

But where are you gonna get the 1.21 gigawatts of electricity?!
Actually, if you only need to hold that wattage for a second, then it's not that bad.  If you need to dish out that total power in one second, then you got some real problems.
__________
BrianHG.
 

Offline james_s

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 9270
  • Country: us
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #24 on: May 11, 2017, 08:36:04 pm »
Fluxcapacitor

But where are you gonna get the 1.21 gigawatts of electricity?!
Actually, if you only need to hold that wattage for a second, then it's not that bad.  If you need to dish out that total power in one second, then you got some real problems.

Unfortunately they sort of glossed over those details in the movie.

One thing I've always wanted to know is how did he fit a nuclear power plant into a car? It would have been more believable if the flux capacitor was based on nuclear fission directly rather than electricity.
 

Online Kjelt

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 5655
  • Country: nl
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #25 on: May 11, 2017, 08:40:59 pm »
A battery the size of an AA cell with a voltage of 12V and capacity of >2Ah that can be (dis)charged 100000 times and has a chargetime of a few minutes without getting hot.

Oh yeah and from BTF I would like a Mr. Fusion   8)
« Last Edit: May 11, 2017, 08:42:31 pm by Kjelt »
 

Offline james_s

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 9270
  • Country: us
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #26 on: May 11, 2017, 08:45:45 pm »

Oh yeah and from BTF I would like a Mr. Fusion   8)

There you go, I'd take one of those too, got a place next to my house where it would fit nicely. Conveniently next to both my electric service entry and where I keep my garbage and recycle bins.
 

Offline Tomorokoshi

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 769
  • Country: us
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #27 on: May 11, 2017, 08:46:06 pm »
Actual Zener diodes, not TVS, in a through-hole package rated to between 8W and 10W.
 

Online AndyC_772

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 3446
  • Country: gb
  • Professional design engineer
    • Cawte Engineering | Reliable Electronics
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #28 on: May 11, 2017, 08:58:43 pm »
I'd like to see more switching regulators available with built in inductors and diodes and ceramic capacitors.. in DIP or soic or something like that. Basically just add input and output capacitors and you're done.  Linear has a bunch of them but they're mostly BGA or similar packages and cost a lot (15$+). Don't see why it would be so hard to make cheap ones with just vin , vout and maybe adjusting output voltage using a resistor.

Do you know about these?

https://www.altera.com/products/power/devices.html#powersoc-converters

Online Ian.M

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 8013
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #29 on: May 11, 2017, 09:04:49 pm »
Actual Zener diodes, not TVS, in a through-hole package rated to between 8W and 10W.
You can bodge that, though its NDG if it ever needs to be forward biassed.  Simply take a TO220 power BJT, HFE>100 and solder a SMD SOD-323 Zener directly between base and collector next to the body, then crop the excess base lead.
« Last Edit: May 11, 2017, 09:07:55 pm by Ian.M »
 

Online BrianHG

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 2961
  • Country: ca
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #30 on: May 11, 2017, 09:11:17 pm »
Actual Zener diodes, not TVS, in a through-hole package rated to between 8W and 10W.
:-DD The only 2 high power zener diode available today, ok so it's a stud mount through hole:
https://www.digikey.ca/product-detail/en/microsemi-corporation/1N3311B/1N3311B-ND/4377736
https://www.digikey.ca/product-detail/en/microsemi-corporation/1N3344B/1N3344B-ND/306760
look at the price...  :scared:
« Last Edit: May 11, 2017, 09:13:05 pm by BrianHG »
__________
BrianHG.
 

Online BrianHG

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 2961
  • Country: ca
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #31 on: May 11, 2017, 09:20:19 pm »
Oh..  would be nice to have a CHEAP (<10$)  all-in-one video card IC , let's say with only only LVDS or displayport (so you don't pay royalties for hdmi), with 2D only so it won't use a lot of power and 1366x768 60hz or 1080p 30/60hz (make it with a 8 MB / 16 MB / 32 MB sram/sdram/ddram buffer integrated in the chip, shoudn't be that hard since there's already ssd controllers with so much ram built in).

Shouldn't be hard to make a chip powered from a single 5v (only saying it because displayport connectors already have 5v in it) and/or maybe 3.3v-3.6v power supply and some simple input (spi/i2c/parallel 8bit/16bit etc).

Make it simple .. just initialize and configure the resolution and bpp (let's say 8bit / 16 bit / 24 bit / 32bit which defines the frame buffer size and number of frames in buffer) and then the chip could do it all without communication from processor, microcontroller, no hand-holding. Make it possible to write directly to the onboard memory in one of the frames in the buffer (and/or have some commands to be able overlay text, print text etc over what's there already), some basic commands to flip between frame buffers (for vsync and so you won't have screen tears, purposes etc) and then the graphics card converts the memory buffer to displayport/lvds output.

Would be awesome if it had maybe some very basic overlay support and hardware decoder support for some h264 or something like that. Doesn't have to be any h264 profile possible, could be just basic / lightweight h264 profile (let's say max 720p 2-3 mbps), to save transistors and memory and power. Basically, so you could tell the card to overlay a 640x360 h264 stream somewhere and then the microcontroller can push data into the chip through a 8bit to 32bit connection.. let's say videos with maximum 1 mbps bitrate and have the video card do the hard part.

Go here: https://www.eevblog.com/forum/beginners/outputting-to-hdmi-with-a-low-power-mcu/
__________
BrianHG.
 

Offline Muxr

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 1342
  • Country: us
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #32 on: May 11, 2017, 09:22:00 pm »
Beefy FPGAs or CPLDs with less pins.
 
The following users thanked this post: mark03, alexanderbrevig, Sferix

Online richard.cs

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 667
  • Country: gb
  • Electronics engineer from Southampton, UK.
    • Random stuff I've built (mostly non-electronic and fairly dated).
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #33 on: May 11, 2017, 09:27:05 pm »
A four pin device.
One pin is ground.
One is +3.3 or +5V.
One pin is an analog input.
One pin is the PWM output, duty proportional to the input voltage over the supply voltage.

It exists: http://www.linear.com/product/LTC6992-1

Well, six pins rather than four. The other two are used to configure (via external resistors) the oscillator frequency, a variable internal divider (to provide additional frequency range, and the output polarity.
 
The following users thanked this post: ali_asadzadeh

Offline Codebird

  • Regular Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 161
  • Country: gb
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #34 on: May 11, 2017, 09:28:27 pm »
Quote
Sounds exactly what the smallest PICs and similar micros are designed for.

It just feels wrong, somehow, to use a microcontroller for something so trivial.
 
The following users thanked this post: PointyOintment

Online mariush

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 3767
  • Country: ro
  • .
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #35 on: May 11, 2017, 09:51:30 pm »

Go here: https://www.eevblog.com/forum/beginners/outputting-to-hdmi-with-a-low-power-mcu/

Yes, read thread, still nothing as simple as i want them. 32-64 pin soic, tqfn/qfp , just add oscillator , 5v/3.3v and maybe 1.8v for internals , spi or parallel in, let's say max 2-5w power consumption, no babysitting, can work with or without connection to mcu meaning no need for mcu to constantly push data, no dma transfers required.. (for example let's say i want to make a kindle style tablet for text only, i want to just use low speed spi to fill a second frame buffer with content while another frame is shown and then just say command to change the frame), or for example i don't need to resend the whole screen if i want to just copy a 8x8 pixel block to another frame and invert a line in it and then copy it back (to simulate a text cursor or mouse pointer), no vga crap, no analogue stuff, just chip reading internal frame buffer and producing digital output independently from the controller..

« Last Edit: May 11, 2017, 09:55:14 pm by mariush »
 

Offline MLXXXp

  • Regular Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 221
  • Country: ca
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #36 on: May 11, 2017, 09:57:54 pm »
I don't know if this thread is only for electronic components but:

A standard 0.1" male header strip but with the short ends replaced with something like a tiny banana plug. The long ends could be plugged into a solderless breadboard to provide temporary, reusable, connections to breakout boards designed to have header strips soldered to them. Once the device is tested on the breadboard the header could be removed without needing to desolder it. The cost of this header shouldn't be exorbitantly higher than a standard header strip.

This would be for cases where I want to experiment with a device but I don't know whether I'm going to use male or female headers, or direct wires, or something else, when I build it into something more permanent.

If you need a better explanation of what I'm talking about, it would be something like this but with a reusable spring connection (like a banana plug or equivalent) instead of the loops that are meant to be press fit in only once:
https://www.sparkfun.com/products/retired/10527
 

Offline NivagSwerdna

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 1759
  • Country: gb
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #37 on: May 11, 2017, 09:58:24 pm »
5mm LEDs with built in resistors.
http://uk.farnell.com/multicomp/mcl053had-12/led-5mm-2v-36-orange/dp/1581228


 :-+  Oh My Oh My!  That's awesome.  I'll add some to my next order (and then probably accidentally mix them up with the regular ones!)

Probably the 5V... http://uk.farnell.com/multicomp/mcl053hpd-5/led-5mm-brt-red-2-8mcd-650nm/dp/1581220   :clap:
 

Offline Circlotron

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 1615
  • Country: au
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #38 on: May 11, 2017, 10:02:58 pm »
A Schmitt optocoupler like a H11L1 but with super hi impedance input side.

Only micros with linear address space. Segmented memory devices banned.
 

Offline bjcuizon

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 284
  • Country: nz
  • RF and Analog Electronics Enthusiast
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #39 on: May 11, 2017, 10:17:09 pm »
Fluxcapacitor

Apparently, Jaycar (Aus/NZ electronics store) has it for $200,000
https://www.jaycar.co.nz/flux-capacitor/p/OUTATIME
Don't mess with an Electronics Engineer, it Megahertz!
 

Offline Cerebus

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 3396
  • Country: gb
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #40 on: May 11, 2017, 10:19:33 pm »
An Ideal OpAmp with +/- infinite output voltage, and no need for decoupling.

The problem with that, is that the second you open the feedback loop it blows you up, shortly followed by the rest of the universe freezing except for the very, very hot spot that is the plasma cloud that once was you.
Anybody got a syringe I can use to squeeze the magic smoke back into this?
 

Offline Cerebus

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 3396
  • Country: gb
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #41 on: May 11, 2017, 10:23:44 pm »
Beefy FPGAs or CPLDs with less pins.

... in packages that can be successfully laid out on 2 layer boards.
Anybody got a syringe I can use to squeeze the magic smoke back into this?
 
The following users thanked this post: PointyOintment, technix, Muxr

Online BrianHG

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 2961
  • Country: ca
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #42 on: May 11, 2017, 10:25:01 pm »
A Schmitt optocoupler like a H11L1 but with super hi impedance input side.

 ??? I though this already existed, an opto with cmos buffered input.  I guess I was wrong, just buffered outputs.
__________
BrianHG.
 

Online blueskull

  • Supporter
  • ****
  • Posts: 12335
  • Country: cn
  • Power Electronics Guy
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #43 on: May 11, 2017, 10:36:15 pm »
Actual Zener diodes, not TVS, in a through-hole package rated to between 8W and 10W.

Series connect 2 5W Zener didoes maybe? There are 3W~5W ones in glass/ceramic bead package with very thick leads.
 
The following users thanked this post: BrianHG

Online BrianHG

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 2961
  • Country: ca
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #44 on: May 11, 2017, 10:53:01 pm »
Affordable 1KW, dentin free, noise free, 3 phase permanent magnet generator with over 90% efficiency right from 15 rmp through 150 rpm, at all voltage and current loads, with over 98% efficient ideal diode bridge rectifier.  (Looks like I gonna hire/contract a specialist engineer to work on this one...)
__________
BrianHG.
 

Offline mikeselectricstuff

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 12001
  • Country: gb
    • Mike's Electric Stuff
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #45 on: May 11, 2017, 11:11:44 pm »
A low profile (<3mm, don't care how wide)  SMD capacitor, about 10uf, rated at least 35V, which doesn't "sing" acoustically under pulsed loads like PWMed LEDs.
For lower voltages, alu. or tant. polymer caps are great but seems nothing exists at higher voltages.
(and yes, I've tried the Murata ceramic ones that are supposedly quieter. They're not)

Something like a 74HC138 or HC595 with P-channel MOSFET outputs that can source a couple of amps.

A 20mA class  RGBW LED from a brand-name manufacturer like Osram etc.
 
An RGBW LED with on-chip 1-wire driver from a manufacturer that can be trusted for long-term reliability. Ditto white only.

A 16 channel, 100mA per channel ES-PWM LED driver with sensible 1-wire interface and internal regulator for its logic supply that can take up to 30V

A PIC32MX part family with 3-5V supply and IO.

A small 3.3V LDO that cuts off and draws negligible power below 3.4V in ( for use with unprotected LiPo cells)

0R resistors in 0803, 1203 and 1803 packages, for jumpering on single-layer aluminium PCBs

An FPGA family in SSOP-28,QFP/QFN28,48 and 64 with a buttload of Block RAM

A quad N-channel 500mA MOSFET with common source and series gate resistors (to limit slewrate) in a 10 pin MSOP


Youtube channel:Taking wierd stuff apart. Very apart.
Mike's Electric Stuff: High voltage, vintage electronics etc.
Day Job: Mostly LEDs
 
The following users thanked this post: SeanB, Richard Crowley

Offline RoGeorge

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 1655
  • Country: ro
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #46 on: May 11, 2017, 11:20:24 pm »
5mm LEDs with built in resistors.

I still have a few of these from about 20-30 years ago. They were made by a Romanian R&D socialist/communist institute, no longer in existence, called ICCE (Institutul de Cercet?ri pentru Componente Electronice (CCSITS) B?neasa CCSIT-CE).
Back then we use to call them 5 Volts LEDs. They were very unreliable, like all the other (normal) LEDs made under the Iron Curtain Industry, 30 years ago.

If I could only find them, to trace an UI curve for those 5V LEDs compared with a normal (no resistor) LED.

Online blueskull

  • Supporter
  • ****
  • Posts: 12335
  • Country: cn
  • Power Electronics Guy
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #47 on: May 11, 2017, 11:30:48 pm »
A low profile (<3mm, don't care how wide)  SMD capacitor, about 10uf, rated at least 35V, which doesn't "sing" acoustically under pulsed loads like PWMed LEDs.

http://www.mouser.com/Passive-Components/Capacitors/Polymer-Capacitors/_/N-bjuf7Zscv7?P=1z0wrkrZ1z0z7ymZ1yzn2k4Z1yx4atvZ1yzvmafZ1yzxihcZ1yzxinkZ1yztivnZ1yzt0cmZ1yzt0c9&Ns=Pricing|0
 

Offline RoGeorge

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 1655
  • Country: ro
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #48 on: May 11, 2017, 11:34:21 pm »
(SMD capacitors) which doesn't "sing" acoustically under pulsed loads like PWMed LEDs

Maybe Delta-Sigma instead of PWM might help. At least in theory, it should have a more spread spectrum, so it might help with capacitors "singing". Also, this technique is very advantageous when the LED is very dim, it avoids flickering way better then PWM. Only a couple of instructions/channel so it is no processor intensive either. If you already tried it, I would like to know your experimental results, pros and cons, 'cause I know you have hands on experience with some big LED installations.

https://hackaday.io/project/6356-delta-sigma-versus-pwm

Offline Neomys Sapiens

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 1213
  • Country: de
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #49 on: May 11, 2017, 11:39:33 pm »
1.) a hermetic version (same form factor) of everything that comes in a SO package

2.) a really working analogue isolator with 10V 10MHz 10ppm over Mil-temprange

3.) linear thermistors

 

Offline Circlotron

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 1615
  • Country: au
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #50 on: May 11, 2017, 11:43:43 pm »
Be careful what you wish for!
Fifteen years ago I was for quite a while involved in the design of lossless passive resonant snubbers for PFC boost converters. When the mosfet turns on you have reverse recovery current in the main diode so you put a small inductor in series with this diode to taper off the main current then ramp up the reverse current to suck out the stored charges in the diode pn junction in a controlled way. Then you have to capture the energy in this snubbing inductor and using diodes and caps return it to the main output. Great fun and it looks like art and ran like clockwork when it is all done. Back then we wished for perfect diodes to simplify life a bit, and then Lo and behold, along came high voltage silicon carbide Schottky diodes! They worked so much better and simplified the circuit greatly. The unexpected downside though was that there was almost no satisfaction in getting this much simplified circuit up and going. Sure it worked better and from a commercial point of view it was a success, but when you make stuff at home a lot of it is for the ahhhh factor. This new circuit had none of that.
« Last Edit: May 12, 2017, 12:44:22 am by Circlotron »
 

Offline nuno

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 556
  • Country: pt
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #51 on: May 11, 2017, 11:46:23 pm »
Maybe merge both topics?

https://www.eevblog.com/forum/chat/components-you-wish-existed/

3 years later looks like Mike's still craving for a 74HC138 or HC595 with 1A P-channel source drivers on the output :)
« Last Edit: May 11, 2017, 11:50:52 pm by nuno »
 

Online mariush

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 3767
  • Country: ro
  • .
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #52 on: May 12, 2017, 12:02:35 am »
I'd like to see more switching regulators available with built in inductors and diodes and ceramic capacitors.. in DIP or soic or something like that. Basically just add input and output capacitors and you're done.  Linear has a bunch of them but they're mostly BGA or similar packages and cost a lot (15$+). Don't see why it would be so hard to make cheap ones with just vin , vout and maybe adjusting output voltage using a resistor.

Do you know about these?

https://www.altera.com/products/power/devices.html#powersoc-converters

Interesting, wasn't aware of those. Still, the first one I checked is again, expensive.. 11$ for EN2340QI : https://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/altera/EN2340QI/544-2845-2-ND/4430952

Here's what I was looking for at while ago, the basic scenario ..  make a fan controller that can accept 2 pin to 4 pin fans ... detect if fan is plugged in by rpm sensor or by measuring current pulled by fan when it starts,  if there's 4 pin fan detected, use pwm to adjust speed otherwise control fan by adjusting the voltage from the dc-dc converter (could use pwm on the actual power sent to the fan but that could mess up the rpm wire) .
So basically the ideal dc-dc converter for this would be 14v max input, 5v to 12v output, at least 0.5A but capable of 1A or a bit more for a second or so while the fan starts up , protection against short circuit (if dumb user blocks fan with fingers or something else happens that would short the output.. at least for a few seconds until the microcontroller or some circuit reacts and turns off the converter with its enable pin). Would be nice to have more than 0.5A but wouldn't be required.
Even better if such a dc-dc converter could be configured through i2c or spi to simply set the output voltage.

All those Altera seem to be either 6v in , less voltage out , or 14 v in , max 5v out .. wouldn't work for this scenario.

Microchip has some fan controller ICs that can control multiple fans but they seem to work mostly with 4 wire fans , not with plain 2wire or 3 wire fans. They're nice ICs controllable through i2c but not perfect.
 

Offline DBecker

  • Regular Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 219
  • Country: us
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #53 on: May 12, 2017, 12:04:52 am »
I would like a 'perfect' active-synchronous bridge rectifier.  Like four IR11672, but without the external components, in a standard bridge rectifier footprint.

And a similar part for low voltage, perhaps integrated with a switching buck/boost regulator.  That would allow using any power brick up to 24VAC with small gadgets.

A symmetric VIPER chip, that takes 120+120VAC referenced to neutral/ground and draws equally from each leg.  It probably needs a  ground continuity test feature and a fault LED output.  This should be able to safely power the control circuitry of 240VAC appliances that have grounded control panels, without using X or Y capacitors.

 

Offline Neomys Sapiens

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 1213
  • Country: de
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #54 on: May 12, 2017, 12:38:43 am »
And also, a little thing that transports heat ELSEWHERE by quantum linkage. Sort of an infinity heatpipe.
 

Offline karoru

  • Regular Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 196
  • Country: pl
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #55 on: May 12, 2017, 12:47:33 am »
I'd like to get modern equivalent of XR2206. Many hobbyists want to build their own function gen and they end up buying NOS XR2206 for price comparable to serious FPGA, because that "add few switches, passives and buffer" construction is so tempting.
 

Offline Circlotron

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 1615
  • Country: au
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #56 on: May 12, 2017, 12:52:27 am »
And also, a little thing that transports heat ELSEWHERE by quantum linkage. Sort of an infinity heatpipe.
I would use one of those to build an air conditioner with one end in a hot climate and the other in a cold climate. Users at both ends get the benefit. The ultimate win/win machine.
 

Offline Circlotron

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 1615
  • Country: au
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #57 on: May 12, 2017, 01:02:50 am »
An ultraviolet LED that was the right wavelength to erase EPROMs.
 

Online BrianHG

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 2961
  • Country: ca
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #58 on: May 12, 2017, 02:29:39 am »
An ultraviolet LED that was the right wavelength to erase EPROMs.
A xenon strobe light with a few flashes does it in around 5 secs.  A really bright UV Led will still take a good 5-10 min.
__________
BrianHG.
 

Online BrianHG

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 2961
  • Country: ca
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #59 on: May 12, 2017, 02:35:46 am »
A solar cell which converts all of the visible light spectrum + near IR, to electricity with over 75% efficiency, cheap and large and high voltage in a single cell.
__________
BrianHG.
 

Offline Conrad Hoffman

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 1125
  • Country: us
    • The Messy Basement
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #60 on: May 12, 2017, 03:37:04 am »
I'd like to get modern equivalent of XR2206. Many hobbyists want to build their own function gen and they end up buying NOS XR2206 for price comparable to serious FPGA, because that "add few switches, passives and buffer" construction is so tempting.

The available 2206 parts I've tried are not the same as the original 2206. They only meet spec, sweep in particular, over a narrow voltage range. IMO, the only good solution for function generators today is discrete, like the circuits used in various Waveteks, or DDS chips.
 

Online blueskull

  • Supporter
  • ****
  • Posts: 12335
  • Country: cn
  • Power Electronics Guy
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #61 on: May 12, 2017, 04:00:50 am »
Here's what I was looking for at while ago, the basic scenario ..  make a fan controller that can accept 2 pin to 4 pin fans ... detect if fan is plugged in by rpm sensor or by measuring current pulled by fan when it starts,  if there's 4 pin fan detected, use pwm to adjust speed otherwise control fan by adjusting the voltage from the dc-dc converter (could use pwm on the actual power sent to the fan but that could mess up the rpm wire) .

Check out AMIS C5N process, you may be able to get MPW runs for this process at very low price.
If you can find a market for this and can sell as few as 10k chips.
It supports HV devices (with high side N FET possibility, not triple well, but nested drain) and it supports SCMOS rules (so you can use free EDA tools such as ElectricVLSI).
If you are a student you can try to contact MOSIS for a FREE MPW run on your design.
 

Offline radar_macgyver

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 380
  • Country: us
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #62 on: May 12, 2017, 04:31:26 am »
Something like a 74HC138 or HC595 with P-channel MOSFET outputs that can source a couple of amps.

It is over 1A technically, so would the NXP MC33879A count? Otherwise, the ST L9848 can handle 0.8A. Others can be found under "PMIC - Power Distribution Switches, Load Drivers" at Digi-key.
 

Online Mechatrommer

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 9091
  • Country: my
  • reassessing directives...
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #63 on: May 12, 2017, 04:32:26 am »
VCCap = voltage controlled capacitance
VCInd = voltage controlled inductance
VCRes = voltage controlled resistance
analog version, not some stair stepped digital trick. various size smd, TH, various C and L range, various power rating. i know there is digital VCRes or somesort of control, but i'm not aware of VCCap and VCInd even in digital trick.
if something can select, how cant it be intelligent? if something is intelligent, how cant it exist?
 

Offline james_s

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 9270
  • Country: us
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #64 on: May 12, 2017, 04:39:59 am »
I suppose a saturable reactor could be considered a voltage (or current) controlled inductor.
 

Offline jonovid

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 781
  • Country: au
    • JONOVID
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #65 on: May 12, 2017, 04:44:18 am »
artificial silent running muscle for robots. no more mechanical linear actuators,  the use or invention of a type of dynamic filaments producing contraction by say electrical currents, not by buzzing mechanical drives.
Hobby of evil genius      basic knowledge of electronics
 

Online BrianHG

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 2961
  • Country: ca
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #66 on: May 12, 2017, 04:55:22 am »
VCCap = voltage controlled capacitance
This exists, it's called a tuning diode.
Also known as varactor diodes.
Also, higher voltage zener diodes also can be used as tuning diodes.
« Last Edit: May 12, 2017, 04:59:08 am by BrianHG »
__________
BrianHG.
 
The following users thanked this post: Mechatrommer

Online sleemanj

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 2391
  • Country: nz
  • Professional tightwad.
    • The electronics hobby components I sell.
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #67 on: May 12, 2017, 05:43:38 am »
A true ideal diode, two pin, some sensible SMD diode-sized package, drop it in, job done.

Logic level mosfet without body diode.
~~~
EEVBlog Members - get yourself 10% discount off all my electronic components for sale just use the Buy Direct links and use Coupon Code "eevblog" during checkout.  Shipping from New Zealand, international orders welcome :-)
 

Offline Roeland_R

  • Regular Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 60
  • Country: nl
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #68 on: May 12, 2017, 05:58:51 am »
Fluxcapacitor

But where are you gonna get the 1.21 gigawatts of electricity?!

From a Duracell ofcourse.
 

Offline TJ232

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 321
  • Country: 00
  • www.esp8266-projects.com
    • ESP8266 Projects
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #69 on: May 12, 2017, 06:11:48 am »
CR2030 or 2025, for standard housing applications, half a gig lasting for at least 10 years (leakage current, you know...) might be enough for me.
 

Offline jbb

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 679
  • Country: nz
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #70 on: May 12, 2017, 06:18:11 am »
FPGA co-packaged with large DRAM.

(This won't happen because FPGA customers demand long term (>10yr) availability os the same part and DRAM chip manufacturers only offer a given die for a few (maybe 5) years.)
 

Online blueskull

  • Supporter
  • ****
  • Posts: 12335
  • Country: cn
  • Power Electronics Guy
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #71 on: May 12, 2017, 06:23:53 am »
FPGA co-packaged with large DRAM.

(This won't happen because FPGA customers demand long term (>10yr) availability os the same part and DRAM chip manufacturers only offer a given die for a few (maybe 5) years.)

Maybe, but if FPGA is copackaged or even co-died with a CPU, then the lifecycle requirement is much shorter.
We are all expecting Intel's next Xeon FPGA.
 

Online AndyC_772

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 3446
  • Country: gb
  • Professional design engineer
    • Cawte Engineering | Reliable Electronics
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #72 on: May 12, 2017, 06:28:42 am »
Interesting, wasn't aware of those. Still, the first one I checked is again, expensive.. 11$ for EN2340QI

Most of the range is designed to do 5V in, low voltage out, which is absolutely ideal if you're designing a logic board with lots of devices all requiring different supplies. These parts are my go-to solution to power microcontrollers, FPGAs, DRAM, and any other kind of logic device requiring a low voltage supply. They're compact, efficient, and have that superb, intangible "just work" quality.

For example: EP5357HUI will do 5V in, 3.3V @ 600mA out for $2 in 100+ quantity, and it's just 2.5 x 2.25mm. Amazing.

Offline Circlotron

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 1615
  • Country: au
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #73 on: May 12, 2017, 07:18:24 am »
Decent capacity 5 volt parallel flash memory.
 

Offline GeorgeOfTheJungle

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 1816
  • Country: pl
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #74 on: May 12, 2017, 07:38:07 am »
Actually, if you only need to hold that wattage for a second, then it's not that bad.  If you need to dish out that total power in one second, then you got some real problems.

That's 336 kWh of energy
 #include <unistd.h>
 int main (void) { while (1) fork(); }
 

Online richard.cs

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 667
  • Country: gb
  • Electronics engineer from Southampton, UK.
    • Random stuff I've built (mostly non-electronic and fairly dated).
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #75 on: May 12, 2017, 08:13:16 am »
That's 336 kWh of energy
About the energy in a large sack (about 40 kg) of coal.

Even in 1955 a couple of GW peak power could have been achieved by driving into HV electricity distribution cables.
 

Online Kjelt

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 5655
  • Country: nl
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #76 on: May 12, 2017, 08:43:20 am »
Even in 1955 a couple of GW peak power could have been achieved by driving into HV electricity distribution cables.
It would have made the BTF movie quite boring if they just had to plug it in.
 

Offline Sredni

  • Regular Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 185
  • Country: aq
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #77 on: May 12, 2017, 08:50:47 am »
Untanglable cables.

Also, the word "untanglable".
All instruments lie. Usually on the bench.
 

Offline Codebird

  • Regular Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 161
  • Country: gb
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #78 on: May 12, 2017, 09:15:35 am »
The Space-Folding antenna: DC-to-daylight bandwidth and 100% efficiency in a handy 5cm package. No more wires longer than your garden to work the HF bands.
 

Offline timb

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 2528
  • Country: us
  • Pretentiously Posting Polysyllabic Prose
    • timb.us
Components you wish existed.
« Reply #79 on: May 12, 2017, 01:50:08 pm »
artificial silent running muscle for robots. no more mechanical linear actuators,  the use or invention of a type of dynamic filaments producing contraction by say electrical currents, not by buzzing mechanical drives.

It exists! Check out Muscle Wire (aka Nitinol). It's a shape memory alloy made from nickel/titanium. Passing current through it generates heat, causing it to contract.

It's been commercially available for at least 20 years.
« Last Edit: May 12, 2017, 01:51:54 pm by timb »
Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic; e.g., Cheez Whiz, Hot Dogs and RF.
 

Offline ChristofferB

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 519
  • Country: dk
  • Chemistry grad student.
    • My channel:
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #80 on: May 12, 2017, 01:52:32 pm »
Fluxcapacitor

But where are you gonna get the 1.21 gigawatts of electricity?!
Actually, if you only need to hold that wattage for a second, then it's not that bad.  If you need to dish out that total power in one second, then you got some real problems.

Unfortunately they sort of glossed over those details in the movie.

One thing I've always wanted to know is how did he fit a nuclear power plant into a car? It would have been more believable if the flux capacitor was based on nuclear fission directly rather than electricity.

And IF you had a conventional nuclear power plant in a car, it'd be a minor (in comparison) conversion having the car itself run off of it too.

-A passive directional coupler that works ideally from DC(almost) to 10+GHz would be neat!
--Christoffer
Check out my scientific instruments diy (GC, HPLC, NMR, etc):
Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCZ8l6SdZuRuoSdze1dIpzAQ
 

Offline dimkasta

  • Regular Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 185
  • Country: gr
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #81 on: May 12, 2017, 02:08:16 pm »
High gain, ultra low noise, low capacitance, truly complementary and matched Jfets

And the same thing on power jfets
 

Offline w2aew

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 1735
  • Country: us
  • I usTa cuDnt speL enjinere, noW I aR wuN
    • My YouTube Channel
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #82 on: May 12, 2017, 02:26:09 pm »
VCCap = voltage controlled capacitance
VCInd = voltage controlled inductance
VCRes = voltage controlled resistance
analog version, not some stair stepped digital trick. various size smd, TH, various C and L range, various power rating. i know there is digital VCRes or somesort of control, but i'm not aware of VCCap and VCInd even in digital trick.

There are voltage controlled capacitors (for small capacitance values), it is called a varactor diode, or varicap diode.
Also, a MOSFET can be used as a voltage controlled resistor it its linear region.
For AC/RF applications, a PIN diode is a voltage controlled resistor.
======================================
YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/w2aew
FAE for Tektronix
 
The following users thanked this post: Mechatrommer

Offline DJohn

  • Regular Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 103
  • Country: gb
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #83 on: May 12, 2017, 03:47:17 pm »
FPGA co-packaged with large DRAM.

Xilinx XCVU37P.  FPGA with 8GB of DRAM sitting on top.
 
The following users thanked this post: jbb

Offline babysitter

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 804
  • Country: de
  • pushing silicon at work
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #84 on: May 12, 2017, 03:49:38 pm »
VCInd = voltage controlled inductance
analog version, not some stair stepped digital trick. various size smd, TH, various C and L range, various power rating. i know there is digital VCRes or somesort of control, but i'm not aware of VCCap and VCInd even in digital trick.

Use a core with two wire loops, use the one for your application, apply A DC voltage to the second. when you get close to saturation... tadaaaa!

(Once had >Rohde & Schwarz SWOB II that uses this to tune some oscillators that way.)
I'm not a feature, I'm a bug! ARC DG3HDA
 
The following users thanked this post: ali_asadzadeh, BrianHG

Offline IanJ

  • Supporter
  • ****
  • Posts: 992
  • Country: scotland
  • Pro EE guy many years ago, now a hobby/home biz.
    • IanJohnston.com
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #85 on: May 12, 2017, 03:49:43 pm »
zero ppm/degC resistors of all sizes and cheap.

I'll get ma coat......

Ian.
Ian Johnston
www.ianjohnston.com
Manufacturer of the PDVS2 & PDVS2mini
 

Offline JanJansen

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 386
  • Country: nl
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #86 on: May 12, 2017, 04:10:49 pm »
3.) linear thermistors

Tempco resistors ?, i need those also.
They do exist, only not for sale anymore.
aliexpress parachute
 

Offline KL27x

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 3449
  • Country: us
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #87 on: May 12, 2017, 10:15:42 pm »
Quote
8-bit Optocoupler Isolator in DIP package.

There is a reason this doesn't exist. If you stack 8 single DIP optocouplers side by side, they fit the same footprint and have the same pinout. And per cost of the devices, it will be cheaper and have greater flexibility.

If you want to save money on board and assembly cost, and you are using DIP, you are doing it wrong. I wonder what you are prototyping that this package will save you considerable time and effort. :)
« Last Edit: May 12, 2017, 10:18:26 pm by KL27x »
 

Offline SeanB

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 15094
  • Country: za
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #88 on: May 13, 2017, 05:39:11 pm »
Vacuum thermistors for oscillator stabilization. They used to exist and weren't too expensive, but now unobtainium. Last I saw were the Bowthorpe or NTC RA series. Lots of data sheets out there, but nobody seems to have actual parts.

About the only replacement I can suggest is to get a small grain of wheat lamp, 28VDC rating, and use that. Tungsten filament, vacuum sealed, and does work well when run at under 3V on the filament, with a good control range and only minor room temperature dependence. You will have to drive with a higher current than the RA53 ( I do actually have some in a pack here, but the lamp was easier) but not that much more.

Like this one

http://za.rs-online.com/web/p/filament-indicator-lamps/6559479/
« Last Edit: May 13, 2017, 05:45:11 pm by SeanB »
 

Offline carljrb

  • Contributor
  • Posts: 24
  • Country: ca
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #89 on: May 13, 2017, 08:29:28 pm »
It just feels wrong, somehow, to use a microcontroller for something so trivial.
To some extent it does but sometimes it's the least bad solution.

Sure, you can make something out of a bunch of circuits (large and expensive, not flexible), or use something like a LTC6992 indeed, but it's an expensive part and that might still require a bunch of circuitry to make it work as you'd wish. I just made something like this out of a PIC10F320 because it was simpler, more flexible and cheaper overall.

It's a a simple fan controller, with a MCP9701 temp sensor (analog), and a cheap but good enough logic level N-Ch MOSFET driving the fan in PWM (no feedback). This way I can change the temperature at which the fan starts, which PWM % the fan starts at, and what the curve will be like overall. Setting those things in hardware would have sucked in many ways. Here the code is easily tweakable, and the total BOM including the PCB is under $2.

The main downside is that the PicKit ICSP header is kinda big for the board. The temp sensor, MCU, LDO and MOSFET are all SOT-23 so it's quite a small board.
 

Offline jbb

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 679
  • Country: nz
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #90 on: May 13, 2017, 09:56:42 pm »
We are all expecting Intel's next Xeon FPGA.

Oh yes, yes we are.

It's gonna be fun watching the high level language guys run smack into the realities of FPGA work  >:D.  Even the best high level 'software' code to Hardware Descriptor Language (HDL) generators won't deliver good results unless you understand the reality of how an FPGA works.  This might cause opportunities for embedded / HDL people to change roles a bit if they want to.
 

Offline theatrus

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 346
  • Country: us
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #91 on: May 13, 2017, 10:14:26 pm »
It just feels wrong, somehow, to use a microcontroller for something so trivial.
To some extent it does but sometimes it's the least bad solution.

Sure, you can make something out of a bunch of circuits (large and expensive, not flexible), or use something like a LTC6992 indeed, but it's an expensive part and that might still require a bunch of circuitry to make it work as you'd wish. I just made something like this out of a PIC10F320 because it was simpler, more flexible and cheaper overall.

It's a a simple fan controller, with a MCP9701 temp sensor (analog), and a cheap but good enough logic level N-Ch MOSFET driving the fan in PWM (no feedback). This way I can change the temperature at which the fan starts, which PWM % the fan starts at, and what the curve will be like overall. Setting those things in hardware would have sucked in many ways. Here the code is easily tweakable, and the total BOM including the PCB is under $2.

The main downside is that the PicKit ICSP header is kinda big for the board. The temp sensor, MCU, LDO and MOSFET are all SOT-23 so it's quite a small board.

Look into the TagConnect if you want something much smaller without resorting to custom pinprobes.
Software by day, hardware by night; blueAcro.com
 

Offline retrolefty

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 1604
  • Country: us
  • measurement changes behavior
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #92 on: May 13, 2017, 10:19:59 pm »
artificial silent running muscle for robots. no more mechanical linear actuators,  the use or invention of a type of dynamic filaments producing contraction by say electrical currents, not by buzzing mechanical drives.

It exists! Check out Muscle Wire (aka Nitinol). It's a shape memory alloy made from nickel/titanium. Passing current through it generates heat, causing it to contract.

It's been commercially available for at least 20 years.

 Actually around 40 years ago I first ran across Foxboro chart recorders that used Nitinol wire 'motors' to drive the plotting pin across a rotating paper strip. Very linear, medium speed, but somewhat current heavy and Nitinol was somewhat pricey in those days. Cool stuff, there are sources for hobbyist and can be pretty cool in some unique applications.

 

Online BrianHG

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 2961
  • Country: ca
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #93 on: May 13, 2017, 10:23:56 pm »
Lithium Oxygen battery packs.
Well, if I wait long enough, they should be with us in around 15 years.  The bigger question is how affordable will they be?
__________
BrianHG.
 

Offline cdev

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 5082
  • Country: 00
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #94 on: May 13, 2017, 10:42:14 pm »
Most of us already have such an ability, and don't realize it. Its in the earth. You just need a heat exchanger that can properly utilize it. A typical system uses buried pipes. Depending on what the average temperature of the earth there is you can potentially save substantial amounts of energy this way.

Most people have had the experience of being in a cave. Even in areas where outside its a boiling desert, or frigid weather, the temperature in caves underground stays relatively stable year round. You might need a little bit of boosting to get it to 72 in the winter and it might be difficult to achieve really low temps in summer, but "geothermal" as its called really is a huge potential money saver. The biggest one time cost is getting your heat exchanger deep enough, usually they will use buried pipes in a deep trench going back and forth.



Quote from: Circlotron on 2017-05-11, 18:52:27>Quote from: Neomys Sapiens on 2017-05-11, 18:38:43
And also, a little thing that transports heat ELSEWHERE by quantum linkage. Sort of an infinity heatpipe.
I would use one of those to build an air conditioner with one end in a hot climate and the other in a cold climate. Users at both ends get the benefit. The ultimate win/win machine.
"What the large print giveth, the small print taketh away."
 

Online blueskull

  • Supporter
  • ****
  • Posts: 12335
  • Country: cn
  • Power Electronics Guy
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #95 on: May 14, 2017, 12:12:42 am »
It's gonna be fun watching the high level language guys run smack into the realities of FPGA work  >:D.  Even the best high level 'software' code to Hardware Descriptor Language (HDL) generators won't deliver good results unless you understand the reality of how an FPGA works.  This might cause opportunities for embedded / HDL people to change roles a bit if they want to.

That's why Altera and Intel have spent so many years on OpenCL, and Intel knows exactly how to do OpenCL correctly.
Intel had a failed attempt on creating x86+FPGA SoC, and the failed product is Atom E6x5C.
It is basically an Arria 2 copackaged with an Atom E6x0, connected through PCIe.
At that point, Altera hadn't touched OpenCL yet, so as you can expect, software engineers didn't really know what to do with the extra Altera silicon.
I guess Intel has learned enough from its failed attempt, and by acquiring Altera, they should have even more understanding on FPGA SoC design and OpenCL implementation.
 

Offline westfw

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 3027
  • Country: us
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #96 on: May 14, 2017, 05:31:36 am »
Switching regulator with built-in inductors:  TI "nanomodules": http://www.ti.com/product/lmz20502 and similar.
They're supposed to be reasonable cheap "in quantity."   They're about $5 in small quantities.  Various other vendors have similar modules.  Murata, Torex, Recom...  https://www.digikey.com/products/en/power-supplies-board-mount/dc-dc-converters/922?k=&pkeyword=&pv1525=94&FV=15c0002%2C9540008%2Cffe0039a&mnonly=0&newproducts=0&ColumnSort=0&page=1&quantity=11&ptm=0&fid=0&pageSize=25
 

Offline westfw

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 3027
  • Country: us
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #97 on: May 14, 2017, 05:35:19 am »
I'd like a micrcontroller "pin amplifier."  Something that would push/pull 5V@200mA or so from a wimpy 3.3V ARM chip, AND sense/handle input as well.  They make auto-sensing bi-directional level translators, and they make H-bridge drives/chips; I want their functionalities combined.
 

Offline GeorgeOfTheJungle

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 1816
  • Country: pl
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #98 on: May 19, 2017, 02:43:59 pm »
Magic smoke refills !!!
 #include <unistd.h>
 int main (void) { while (1) fork(); }
 

Online BrianHG

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 2961
  • Country: ca
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #99 on: May 19, 2017, 03:32:23 pm »
Affordable 1KW, dentin free, noise free, 3 phase permanent magnet generator with over 90% efficiency right from 15 rmp through 150 rpm, at all voltage and current loads, with over 98% efficient ideal diode bridge rectifier.  (Looks like I gonna hire/contract a specialist engineer to work on this one...)

Wind turbine, I assume?

Exercise bike...
Though, over 1kw is intermittent.  Top riders can sustain an average of 700 watts at the pedals for an hour under occasional peak performance conditions.  I don't want gearing and, IE crank shaft right on the motor, but I also need to simulate the effect of a flywheel for the lower RPM and the sharp transition multi-ton torque point generated when a rider shifts his weight on each peddle when sprinting.  I might be stuck with a chain & gear up to a pancake generator to increase RMP & have a bit of mechanical flywheel effect to aid the software loading, but, I'll loose power efficiency when sending the surplus generated back to the grid and increase weight and frame/chassis complexity.

« Last Edit: May 19, 2017, 03:37:17 pm by BrianHG »
__________
BrianHG.
 

Offline Cerebus

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 3396
  • Country: gb
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #100 on: May 19, 2017, 04:50:19 pm »
Top riders can sustain an average of 700 watts at the pedals for an hour under occasional peak performance conditions.

A bit less than 700W. The UCI hour takes around 500 watts average power for an hour and, pretty much by definition, that's the world record for average cycling power output over an hour. The 1972 record of Eddie Merckx has been calculated at 485 W average and that's probably the highest effort attained because, although the record has been broken several times since, the bikes have improved over the same period reducing the actual physical effort required.
Anybody got a syringe I can use to squeeze the magic smoke back into this?
 

Offline JPortici

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 2560
  • Country: it
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #101 on: May 19, 2017, 05:12:02 pm »
I would like a 'perfect' active-synchronous bridge rectifier.  Like four IR11672, but without the external components, in a standard bridge rectifier footprint.

And a similar part for low voltage, perhaps integrated with a switching buck/boost regulator.  That would allow using any power brick up to 24VAC with small gadgets.

something like... http://www.mouser.it/new/Fairchild-Semiconductor/fairchild-greenbridge-solutions/
?
 

Offline timgiles

  • Regular Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 237
  • Country: se
  • Programmer, DB architect
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #102 on: May 19, 2017, 05:38:25 pm »
A real working 800% batteriser!
 

Online BrianHG

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 2961
  • Country: ca
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #103 on: May 19, 2017, 06:35:44 pm »
Top riders can sustain an average of 700 watts at the pedals for an hour under occasional peak performance conditions.

A bit less than 700W. The UCI hour takes around 500 watts average power for an hour and, pretty much by definition, that's the world record for average cycling power output over an hour. The 1972 record of Eddie Merckx has been calculated at 485 W average and that's probably the highest effort attained because, although the record has been broken several times since, the bikes have improved over the same period reducing the actual physical effort required.

You are correct, the reported 700watts I saw was for 1h and 25min, not 1 hour.  As for the extra power on the generator, without a flywheel, the generator needs to withstand the 2 heavy torque strokes in the pedaling cadence at lower RMP without fail, otherwise the rider will get a slip, like when a stepper motor skips.  Just having heavier magnets and a slightly larger diameter which comes with a more powerful generator will also add to the mechanical flywheel effect as well.

Note, we are talking power at the pedals, not power transmitted to the road after all the mechanical gears/bearings/wheels...
« Last Edit: May 19, 2017, 06:39:11 pm by BrianHG »
__________
BrianHG.
 

Offline Housedad

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 512
  • Country: us
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #104 on: May 19, 2017, 07:00:03 pm »
Fluxcapacitor

But where are you gonna get the 1.21 gigawatts of electricity?!
Actually, if you only need to hold that wattage for a second, then it's not that bad.  If you need to dish out that total power in one second, then you got some real problems.

Unfortunately they sort of glossed over those details in the movie.

One thing I've always wanted to know is how did he fit a nuclear power plant into a car? It would have been more believable if the flux capacitor was based on nuclear fission directly rather than electricity.
It was a fusion device, not fission. The name on the side of the unit said "Mister Fusion". 
« Last Edit: May 19, 2017, 07:02:03 pm by Housedad »
At least I'm still older than my test equipment
 

Offline Cerebus

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 3396
  • Country: gb
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #105 on: May 19, 2017, 07:07:43 pm »
You are correct, the reported 700watts I saw was for 1h and 25min, not 1 hour. 

Still something very wrong about that figure. That's a higher power output figure for a longer period, which common sense (and your aching legs) tells you is not the way that human endurance works. I think someone's quoted you figures for peak power output during a 1h 25m race, which I can believe, for an all out sprint in the final 200 metres of a race.
Anybody got a syringe I can use to squeeze the magic smoke back into this?
 

Offline helius

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 2853
  • Country: us
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #106 on: May 19, 2017, 07:20:20 pm »
It was a fusion device, not fission. The name on the side of the unit said "Mister Fusion". 
That was the version of the car that came back from 2015. The 1985 version ran on plutonium: that's why Doc had to make a bargain with the terrorists!
 

Online BrianHG

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 2961
  • Country: ca
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #107 on: May 19, 2017, 08:31:55 pm »
You are correct, the reported 700watts I saw was for 1h and 25min, not 1 hour. 

Still something very wrong about that figure. That's a higher power output figure for a longer period, which common sense (and your aching legs) tells you is not the way that human endurance works. I think someone's quoted you figures for peak power output during a 1h 25m race, which I can believe, for an all out sprint in the final 200 metres of a race.
Hmmmm, that would be average 495watts/hour at an hour and 25 minutes, measured with Powertap P1 Powermeter Pedals which have a +/- 2% error rating.  I'm going to have to find the original supplied log posting as I am nowhere near this figure (my record when my back was better was 225 watts at 1h, 40min, however, that was surplus wattage measured coming from a treadmill motor linked to a stationary exercise bike by a rubber belt as a generator & halogen lamps as a load).  I know sustaining a perfect 408 watts for 1 hour straight is considered a typical minimum capability for TDF grade racers.

NOTE: This is an old image before the control board circuitry and PC control logging, but, you get the idea...
« Last Edit: May 19, 2017, 08:39:11 pm by BrianHG »
__________
BrianHG.
 

Offline Cerebus

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 3396
  • Country: gb
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #108 on: May 19, 2017, 09:23:45 pm »

Hmmmm, that would be average 495watts/hour at an hour and 25 minutes, ...

There's your problem. I don't think you understand what Watts are, which I'd kind of assumed you did given where you're posting, which consequently is why this was getting so confusing. 

Watts are the rate of expenditure of energy, also known as power; Watts = Joules per second, so Watts/hour is a meaningless unit (in this context). Watts are a measure of instantaneous energy expenditure, they don't accumulate over time, which seems to be your understanding from your roughly equating 700W over 1h 25m with 500W over 1h. A power of 700W expended over 1h 25m is a total energy expenditure of 3.57 megajoules, 500W over 1h is 1.8 MJ.
Anybody got a syringe I can use to squeeze the magic smoke back into this?
 
The following users thanked this post: PointyOintment

Offline PointyOintment

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 326
  • Country: ca
  • ↑ I scanned my face
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #109 on: May 22, 2017, 12:05:53 am »
I was going to say a composite video ADC, but there are many. For some reason, last time I looked, it seemed there was only a single such device on the market (which I could hardly believe, but I couldn't find any others).

Offline PointyOintment

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 326
  • Country: ca
  • ↑ I scanned my face
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #110 on: May 22, 2017, 02:09:16 am »
VCCap = voltage controlled capacitance

I'll give you something even better: Digi-Key -> ICs -> Specialized ICs -> Type column: Digital Capacitor. Unfortunately the IXYS datasheets are secret and all of the other manufacturers' parts are obsolete.

There's also an Electronically Trimmable Capacitor entry, though I didn't look at those.

(edited because the forum doesn't support Unicode |O)
« Last Edit: May 22, 2017, 02:18:26 am by PointyOintment »
 

Online BrianHG

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 2961
  • Country: ca
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #111 on: May 22, 2017, 03:05:07 am »
Self aware MCU.
__________
BrianHG.
 

Online blueskull

  • Supporter
  • ****
  • Posts: 12335
  • Country: cn
  • Power Electronics Guy
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #112 on: May 22, 2017, 03:13:38 am »
 

Offline David Chamberlain

  • Regular Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 238
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #113 on: May 22, 2017, 05:30:51 pm »
I'll put a second vote in for a cpld or self booting fpga with on board flash with lower pin count then what is available. Lots of glue logic and other simple stuff could be done with a device with 16 io but more cells. I guess that kind of product only interests hoists like me.
 

Online BrianHG

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 2961
  • Country: ca
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #114 on: May 22, 2017, 05:38:46 pm »
A random number generator which matches the results of the next lottery draw here in Canada.
__________
BrianHG.
 

Offline schmitt trigger

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 1332
  • Country: mx
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #115 on: May 23, 2017, 12:38:06 am »
A fully complementary pair for the 6L6 vacuum tube.  ;D

 

Offline schmitt trigger

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 1332
  • Country: mx
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #116 on: May 23, 2017, 12:52:52 am »
And while we are at it, a ferrite power material with Bsat of 1.5 Tesla, and usable to at least 100Khz.
 

Online Ian.M

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 8013
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #117 on: May 23, 2017, 12:56:39 am »
A fully complementary pair for the 6L6 vacuum tube.  ;D
I wouldn't want to be within a couple of hundred miles of a compliment to a 6L6 tube - if the envelope cracks and air gets at the antimatter electrodes, it will make the Hiroshima bomb look like a firecracker.
 

Offline NivagSwerdna

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 1759
  • Country: gb
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #118 on: May 23, 2017, 10:08:14 am »
here's hoping

A reasonably priced portable multimeter (capable of uA measurement) that contains an inbuilt datalogger for subsequent analysis.
 

Offline Circlotron

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 1615
  • Country: au
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #119 on: May 23, 2017, 12:27:09 pm »
A fully complementary pair for the 6L6 vacuum tube.  ;D
I wouldn't want to be within a couple of hundred miles of a compliment to a 6L6 tube - if the envelope cracks and air gets at the antimatter electrodes, it will make the Hiroshima bomb look like a firecracker.
What's wrong with "hello 6L6, you're looking smart today!"?
A full complement may well be dangerous, as you say.
 
The following users thanked this post: PointyOintment

Online AndyC_772

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 3446
  • Country: gb
  • Professional design engineer
    • Cawte Engineering | Reliable Electronics
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #120 on: May 23, 2017, 01:14:27 pm »
A reasonably priced portable multimeter (capable of uA measurement) that contains an inbuilt datalogger for subsequent analysis.
Fluke 289? Depends on your definition of 'reasonably priced', I guess. Mine cost much less than the value of the job I needed it for, so it definitely met that criterion.

Offline NivagSwerdna

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 1759
  • Country: gb
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #121 on: May 23, 2017, 02:22:53 pm »
A reasonably priced portable multimeter (capable of uA measurement) that contains an inbuilt datalogger for subsequent analysis.
Fluke 289? Depends on your definition of 'reasonably priced', I guess. Mine cost much less than the value of the job I needed it for, so it definitely met that criterion.
That looks nice, but expensive by my definition of reasonably priced... but I concede my definition won't apply to all.  <£300 is my definition.
 

Offline David Hess

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 9902
  • Country: us
  • DavidH
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #122 on: May 23, 2017, 03:05:40 pm »
1. A variety of monolithic matched transistor arrays.
2. Monolithic cross coupled quads - these are used for when you need real precision.
3. LCC and PLCC (J-*leaded*) parts including microcontrollers, programmable logic, and memory - these can be surface mounted or placed in sockets for through hole designs.
4. CdS cells - Is there really a problem with hermetically sealed CdS?
 

Offline e100

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 310
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #123 on: May 23, 2017, 03:28:50 pm »
Multimeter with a voice output so you don't have to look at the display.
Alternatively a multimeter with a remote display like the one on the "Google glass" glasses.
 

Offline schmitt trigger

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 1332
  • Country: mx
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #124 on: May 23, 2017, 04:21:18 pm »
You know, this is actually a pretty good idea.

With the freakingly small components, in which one struggles to exactly position a needle pointed probe into whatever is exposed in a leadless component, I have had someone helping me reading out out loud the DMM readings.
 

Offline CJay

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 3321
  • Country: gb
  • M0UAW
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #125 on: May 23, 2017, 05:41:22 pm »
Multimeter with a voice output so you don't have to look at the display.
Alternatively a multimeter with a remote display like the one on the "Google glass" glasses.

Wouldn't be difficult to create, plenty of meters out there with data outputs...
M0UAW
 

Offline Circlotron

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 1615
  • Country: au
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #126 on: May 24, 2017, 12:17:59 am »
Not a component but a DSO that has similar screen resolution to a good tablet and a 16, or dare I say, a 24 bit D/A.  No, I don't need one, I just want one. Today's DSO screens are the equivalent of old timey CGA screens, like looking at the world through flywire.
« Last Edit: May 24, 2017, 12:20:56 am by Circlotron »
 

Offline cdev

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 5082
  • Country: 00
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #127 on: May 24, 2017, 12:41:52 am »
Any multimeter that has a serial out should be easy to hook up to a text to speech app.

You just need some way to tell it when to sample, voice would be best.
I'm surprised that none of the handheld meters have that, it sounds as if it would likely be easy to implement.

Similarly with the AVR Transistor tester. It would be cool to have it be able to tell you verbally what the component was.

Quote from: CJay on Today at 11:41:22>Quote from: e100 on Today at 09:28:50
Multimeter with a voice output so you don't have to look at the display.
Alternatively a multimeter with a remote display like the one on the "Google glass" glasses.

Wouldn't be difficult to create, plenty of meters out there with data outputs...
"What the large print giveth, the small print taketh away."
 

Offline Electro Detective

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 2108
  • Country: au
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #128 on: May 24, 2017, 03:59:24 am »
My Tandy/Radio Shack MICRONTA meter from the 1980/90s? had a voice synth for reading out the values via special probes with a voice switch to activate it (similar to the Fluke 1507/1587 switch probes)

Worked great till the crappy cable with microscopic breakable wires died,
I tried to bodge it to work, and gave up  |O  as I just got a Fluke 87 and 8060A and was busy playing with those :-DMM :-DMM and forgot about the Tandy meter lol.   

It wasn't a bad meter either, had glass -NRC- fuse fitted (lol)  and did work with standard multimeter leads.

I'm a bit more electro savvy nowadays, if it surfaces I will diagnose and repair the sucker and get it talking again   :-/O  :blah: :blah: :blah:

------------------------

UPDATE EDIT: EEVblog member a few posts further down has located a video with the exact meter I mentioned, thanks    :-+





« Last Edit: May 27, 2017, 12:06:32 am by Electro Detective »
 

Offline e100

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 310
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #129 on: May 24, 2017, 04:03:28 am »
Regarding voice output for multimeters, is there enough physical/electrical/data commonality between multimeter data outputs to be able to make a generic product, or would it need to be customised for each model? My Bryman multimeter has an optical interface but I don't know how common or interchangeable this is.

Kickstarter anyone? I would buy one for sure.
 

Offline CJay

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 3321
  • Country: gb
  • M0UAW
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #130 on: May 24, 2017, 07:15:56 am »
Any multimeter that has a serial out should be easy to hook up to a text to speech app.

You just need some way to tell it when to sample, voice would be best.
I'm surprised that none of the handheld meters have that, it sounds as if it would likely be easy to implement.

Depends how you use the meter, if it's got a hold mode then the changing data can trigger it, if you don't want hold mode then some kind of 'RF' button, just a pulse of 433MHz or even one of those dodgy little 'selfie' buttons on the probe, plenty of options to explore
M0UAW
 

Offline CJay

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 3321
  • Country: gb
  • M0UAW
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #131 on: May 24, 2017, 07:26:05 am »
Regarding voice output for multimeters, is there enough physical/electrical/data commonality between multimeter data outputs to be able to make a generic product, or would it need to be customised for each model? My Bryman multimeter has an optical interface but I don't know how common or interchangeable this is.

Kickstarter anyone? I would buy one for sure.

I'd guess the physical interface is a fairly minor thing, AFAIK they're all serial out over some interface so a bunch of interface 'modules' feeding a speech box that 'talks' the various protocols?

I'm in for the kickstarter too, I like the idea even if I've not got a regular use for it.
M0UAW
 

Offline e100

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 310
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #132 on: May 24, 2017, 07:59:24 am »
Regarding voice output for multimeters, is there enough physical/electrical/data commonality between multimeter data outputs to be able to make a generic product, or would it need to be customised for each model? My Bryman multimeter has an optical interface but I don't know how common or interchangeable this is.

Kickstarter anyone? I would buy one for sure.
I'd guess the physical interface is a fairly minor thing..

Based on the only one I've seen, if you don't already have a cable kit from the manufacturer, it's going to need a custom 3d printed or injection molded part that slots into the body of the multimeter so that the Tx Rx LEDs line up.
http://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/jLoAAOxyUgtTJ-YS/s-l1600.jpg

I have no idea if there is a de facto standard for this sort of thing.

Alternatively to save cost it could just have a DB9 or USB connector, leaving the customer to supply the correct interface cable.
« Last Edit: May 24, 2017, 11:56:07 am by e100 »
 

Offline CJay

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 3321
  • Country: gb
  • M0UAW
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #133 on: May 24, 2017, 10:14:47 am »
Regarding voice output for multimeters, is there enough physical/electrical/data commonality between multimeter data outputs to be able to make a generic product, or would it need to be customised for each model? My Bryman multimeter has an optical interface but I don't know how common or interchangeable this is.

Kickstarter anyone? I would buy one for sure.
I'd guess the physical interface is a fairly minor thing..

Based on the only one I've seen, if you don't already have a cable kit from the manufacturer, it's going to need a custom 3 printed or injection molded part that slots into the body of the multimeter so that the Tx Rx LEDs line up.
http://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/jLoAAOxyUgtTJ-YS/s-l1600.jpg

I have no idea if there is a de facto standard for this sort of thing.

Alternatively to save cost it could just have a DB9 or USB connector, leaving to the customer to supply the correct interface cable.

Bad wording on my part, I was meaning the transport (as in PHY, the physical layer) will be IR, RF, Serial, USB or some variant of such and fairly trivial to interface but I'd not expect the mechanical attachment across brands to be standard.

It may well be possible to 3D print clones and I'd take that route at least at first though I doubt it'd be mass market enough to warrant having molds made if the connector wasn't 'off the shelf'.

M0UAW
 

Offline uwezi

  • Supporter
  • ****
  • Posts: 271
  • Country: se
    • GreenPhotons
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #134 on: May 24, 2017, 02:24:45 pm »
regarding the 4-pin PWM-device: something like an ATtiny5/6/9? it comes in a 6-pin SOT23 package, compelet with 8-bit ADC and 16-bit PWM  :)
 

Offline alanambrose

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 273
  • Country: gb
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #135 on: May 24, 2017, 09:04:09 pm »
Ummm, diode, mosfet, & MLCCs (say just 100nF to begin with) in x4 and x8 arrays.

Alan
“A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds"
 

Offline ZaneKaminski

  • Contributor
  • Posts: 13
  • Country: us
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #136 on: May 25, 2017, 02:40:51 am »
A digital scope with waveform update rate constrained only by the sample rate of the scope, i.e. no dead time between acquisitions. Therefore the scope could capture every single trigger-worthy event occurring and combine into a single intensity-graded waveform picture.

Large-value (~10 uF) *medium* ESR ceramic capacitors. Most existing ones have frustratingly low ESR for bypassing applications.

BJT-type device with tightly controlled gain factor between individual devices, over a wide temperature range, etc. Also for there to exist common values for gain.
 

Offline helius

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 2853
  • Country: us
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #137 on: May 25, 2017, 04:35:28 am »
Large-value (~10 uF) *medium* ESR ceramic capacitors. Most existing ones have frustratingly low ESR for bypassing applications.
Is there any reason that simply adding a resistor in series won't work?
 

Online blueskull

  • Supporter
  • ****
  • Posts: 12335
  • Country: cn
  • Power Electronics Guy
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #138 on: May 25, 2017, 04:37:45 am »
Large-value (~10 uF) *medium* ESR ceramic capacitors. Most existing ones have frustratingly low ESR for bypassing applications.

Not if your control loop is properly designed. There are tons of LDO/SMPS controllers that can operate at nearly zero ESR, as long as they're designed properly.
 

Offline uwezi

  • Supporter
  • ****
  • Posts: 271
  • Country: se
    • GreenPhotons
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #139 on: May 25, 2017, 08:58:50 am »
Regarding the multimeter with voice output - those were around already in the mid 1990s - a friend had one and it was just annoying, like everything with a voice output which would babble around all the time, unasked for...

Most of my modern multimeters have "auto-power-off" which is equally annoying!
 

Offline PointyOintment

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 326
  • Country: ca
  • ↑ I scanned my face

Offline e100

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 310
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #141 on: May 25, 2017, 10:41:42 am »
Regarding the multimeter with voice output - those were around already in the mid 1990s - a friend had one and it was just annoying, like everything with a voice output which would babble around all the time, unasked for...

The trick is to make it speak at the right time. For bench use, a simple momentary foot switch would do the job.
« Last Edit: May 25, 2017, 10:49:58 am by e100 »
 

Offline Cerebus

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 3396
  • Country: gb
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #142 on: May 25, 2017, 10:44:25 am »
Large-value (~10 uF) *medium* ESR ceramic capacitors. Most existing ones have frustratingly low ESR for bypassing applications.

Not if your control loop is properly designed. There are tons of LDO/SMPS controllers that can operate at nearly zero ESR, as long as they're designed properly.

What's that got to do with the price of fish? There are plenty of places one needs some bypassing (with the damping of moderate ESR) that are nowhere near a PSU or its control loop, or a control loop of any kind.
Anybody got a syringe I can use to squeeze the magic smoke back into this?
 

Offline MK14

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 2152
  • Country: gb
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #143 on: May 25, 2017, 11:20:05 am »
Primary and rechargeable batteries, at reasonable cost, which are guaranteed (and really) never leak.

Electrolytic Capacitors (i.e. low cost, relatively high capacitance value) which DON'T leak and/or significantly deteriorate, over a large number of years.

Ammo roll component strips/reels, which can peel apart by hand, and leave NO residue (similar to post it notes adhesive, or compressed paper friction holding them WITHOUT glue). Which saves having to cut them out (but hence shorter leads), to avoid dealing with sticky residues, or use components NOT in strips (i.e. boxed loose).

More distinctive/standardized ways of indicating polarity on LEDs.

UV ink printing on smaller surface mount components, so more information (such as values, type etc) can be gleamed from them (with a UV torch or similar) when repairing/inspecting, hand prototyping etc.

Linear voltage regulators designed and guaranteed to almost always fail open circuit, at regular prices.

Put in some kind of anti-fake technology, so that fake components can readily be identified, and rejected/replaced.
E.g. Holograms, encrypted info built into chips, security numbers, micro-dot technology, etc etc.
Something really cheap, easy (and low cost) to check for fakes and yet highly difficult/expensive to defeat.
Include manufactured date (via the encryption/hologram etc, as labels could be over-written), so that reused/used components (from scrapped goods) can also be detected.
« Last Edit: May 25, 2017, 11:22:51 am by MK14 »
 
The following users thanked this post: PointyOintment

Offline helius

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 2853
  • Country: us
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #144 on: May 25, 2017, 02:57:37 pm »
Electrolytic Capacitors (i.e. low cost, relatively high capacitance value) which DON'T leak and/or significantly deteriorate, over a large number of years.
Tantalum and aluminum capacitors with solid polymer electrolyte are available. Well known types include Sanyo OS-CON and others.
 
The following users thanked this post: MK14

Offline David Hess

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 9902
  • Country: us
  • DavidH
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #145 on: May 25, 2017, 05:50:20 pm »
Electrolytic Capacitors (i.e. low cost, relatively high capacitance value) which DON'T leak and/or significantly deteriorate, over a large number of years.

Tantalum and aluminum capacitors with solid polymer electrolyte are available. Well known types include Sanyo OS-CON and others.

Solid polymer electrolytic capacitors have their own wearout mechanism; the polymer degrades following the usual Arrhenius equation halving their operating lifetime for every 10C temperature rise.  Their big advantage is lower ESR yielding lower power dissipation and operating temperature.

The closest thing to an electrolytic capacitor which does not wear out is a solid or wet tantalum capacitor (1) but these have their own issues and high price.  In practice an almost arbitrarily long operating life can be gained using normal aluminum electrolytic or polymer electrolytic capacitors with suitable derating.

(1) And niobium oxide capacitors?
 
The following users thanked this post: MK14

Online AndyC_772

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 3446
  • Country: gb
  • Professional design engineer
    • Cawte Engineering | Reliable Electronics
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #146 on: May 25, 2017, 09:12:19 pm »
I used niobium oxide caps some years ago... from what I recall they were only available with low-ish voltage ratings. Maybe that's changed now?

(To those who aren't familiar with them, they look like tantalum caps but orange instead of yellow. Functionally they're similar, but with less of a tendency to catch fire when abused).

Offline David Hess

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 9902
  • Country: us
  • DavidH
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #147 on: May 26, 2017, 12:40:26 am »
I used niobium oxide caps some years ago... from what I recall they were only available with low-ish voltage ratings. Maybe that's changed now?

That is still the case.  10 volts at 100 microfarads is the largest available and they are only available in surface mount.  Dissipation and leakage are about twice as bad as equivalent solid tantalum capacitors and solid tantalum capacitors can have much lower ESR.  Price is only about 10% better for the same ESR.
 

Offline Cicada

  • Regular Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 85
  • Country: za
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #148 on: May 26, 2017, 07:56:43 am »
Great question.

I am looking forward to reading all the posts on this thread.
 

Offline MK14

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 2152
  • Country: gb
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #149 on: May 27, 2017, 01:39:43 am »
Electrolytic Capacitors (i.e. low cost, relatively high capacitance value) which DON'T leak and/or significantly deteriorate, over a large number of years.
Tantalum and aluminum capacitors with solid polymer electrolyte are available. Well known types include Sanyo OS-CON and others.

Thanks. That is good to know.
They seem to be popular, on better quality motherboards.
At the very least, they get rid of the possibility of the liquid electrolyte leaking, since it would then be solid.

I guess there tendency to have lower max working voltages is fine for usually low voltage motherboard applications, which appreciate the better life expectancy and other characteristic improvements.
 

Offline MK14

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 2152
  • Country: gb
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #150 on: May 27, 2017, 01:47:24 am »
Electrolytic Capacitors (i.e. low cost, relatively high capacitance value) which DON'T leak and/or significantly deteriorate, over a large number of years.

Tantalum and aluminum capacitors with solid polymer electrolyte are available. Well known types include Sanyo OS-CON and others.

Solid polymer electrolytic capacitors have their own wearout mechanism; the polymer degrades following the usual Arrhenius equation halving their operating lifetime for every 10C temperature rise.  Their big advantage is lower ESR yielding lower power dissipation and operating temperature.

The closest thing to an electrolytic capacitor which does not wear out is a solid or wet tantalum capacitor (1) but these have their own issues and high price.  In practice an almost arbitrarily long operating life can be gained using normal aluminum electrolytic or polymer electrolytic capacitors with suitable derating.

(1) And niobium oxide capacitors?

Thanks. Improving the life expectancy by suitably derating the component, is a very useful tip.
(If I remember correctly) suitable derating can mean Tantulums (especially modern ones, WITHOUT the possibility of them overheating and maybe catching on fire), can last virtually forever. But they tend to be pricey.

It's a pity that unlike resistors, which can often just be specified in terms of value, tolerance, max working voltage and power rating (for the bulk of applications). Capacitors came in a large number of varieties and choosing the right one, is not always that easy.

I wonder if in 10 or 50 years time, we will see super capacitors, replace rechargeable batteries, in most applications.
 

Offline David Hess

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 9902
  • Country: us
  • DavidH
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #151 on: May 27, 2017, 01:50:44 am »
Electrolytic Capacitors (i.e. low cost, relatively high capacitance value) which DON'T leak and/or significantly deteriorate, over a large number of years.

Tantalum and aluminum capacitors with solid polymer electrolyte are available. Well known types include Sanyo OS-CON and others.

They seem to be popular, on better quality motherboards.
At the very least, they get rid of the possibility of the liquid electrolyte leaking, since it would then be solid.

The only reason they use them is for their low ESR yielding a high ripple current rating at a given cost.  It became impractical to fit enough aluminum electrolytic capacitors in the area needed to get a low enough ESR and ceramic capacitors would be more expensive.

They are great capacitors but the motherboard makers use them because they are the least expensive solution.
 

Offline David Hess

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 9902
  • Country: us
  • DavidH
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #152 on: May 27, 2017, 02:09:33 am »
Thanks. Improving the life expectancy by suitably derating the component, is a very useful tip.
(If I remember correctly) suitable derating can mean Tantulums (especially modern ones, WITHOUT the possibility of them overheating and maybe catching on fire), can last virtually forever. But they tend to be pricey.

Voltage derating would have made a difference with old solid tantalum capacitors but they were initially marketed as not requiring voltage derating unlike aluminum electrolytic capacitors.  In practice voltage derating them to between 1/2 and 2/3rds can reduce the failure rate to essentially zero excluding surge related failures and voltage derating helps with those also.

Quote
It's a pity that unlike resistors, which can often just be specified in terms of value, tolerance, max working voltage and power rating (for the bulk of applications). Capacitors came in a large number of varieties and choosing the right one, is not always that easy.

ESR and ripple current rating of capacitors were ignored for a long time simply because they were irrelevant in most applications.  That changed when switching power supplies became common.

In a linear or non-active power factor switching regulator, once you have enough input capacitance after the bridge rectifier, you have way more than enough ripple current rating.  The same goes for the output capacitor of a linear regulator.  But the output capacitor or coupling capacitor in a switching regulator is an entirely different matter; there, the ESR and ripple current rating is what matters and the capacitance is usually irrelevant.

Quote
I wonder if in 10 or 50 years time, we will see super capacitors, replace rechargeable batteries, in most applications.

Chemical storage simply has the advantage of much higher energy density than electrostatic storage so I doubt it.  Supercapacitors have their place but it is not in replacing batteries except where power density is more important than energy density.

Another severe disadvantage of capacitors compared to batteries in energy storage applications is that their voltage is proportional to the square root of the energy remaining so the circuits have to deal with a wildly varying voltage which in practice means that only a fraction of the capacitor's energy is available.
 

Offline MK14

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 2152
  • Country: gb
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #153 on: May 27, 2017, 02:13:49 am »

They seem to be popular, on better quality motherboards.
At the very least, they get rid of the possibility of the liquid electrolyte leaking, since it would then be solid.

The only reason they use them is for their low ESR yielding a high ripple current rating at a given cost.  It became impractical to fit enough aluminum electrolytic capacitors in the area needed to get a low enough ESR and ceramic capacitors would be more expensive.

They are great capacitors but the motherboard makers use them because they are the least expensive solution.

With the trend on motherboards, to need ever increasingly higher currents at ever lower voltages (for the cpu, especially). The low ESR makes a lot of sense.

After so many bad caps were produced, a number of years back (rumored to be caused by the Chinese stealing technical details on how to make good capacitors from the Japanese. But who mistakenly got the chemical mixture wrong, so they tended to not last long, before leaking/breaking). Motherboard manufacture's seem to commonly advertise that they have good quality (solid) capacitors, to avoid or minimize that problem.
 

Offline David Hess

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 9902
  • Country: us
  • DavidH
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #154 on: May 27, 2017, 02:39:08 am »
With the trend on motherboards, to need ever increasingly higher currents at ever lower voltages (for the cpu, especially). The low ESR makes a lot of sense.

In other designs, the ratio of voltage to current (resistance) of a CPU's power pins would be considered a short circuit.

Quote
After so many bad caps were produced, a number of years back (rumored to be caused by the Chinese stealing technical details on how to make good capacitors from the Japanese. But who mistakenly got the chemical mixture wrong, so they tended to not last long, before leaking/breaking).

Even the good capacitors would fail eventually and solid polymer electrolytic will also eventually fail although not so visibly.  I replaced the capacitors on my Abit BX6 revision 2 system and it works great.  They were not bad; they just eventually wore out.

I think my Intel GX6 server motherboard uses ceramic capacitors on the CPU voltage regulators but that was a cost is no object design.  They might fail but they will not wear out.

Quote
Motherboard manufacture's seem to commonly advertise that they have good quality (solid) capacitors, to avoid or minimize that problem.

That is just good marketing.  What we produce now is new and improved (while what were were producing before is old and inferior) so upgrade now!
 

Online ali_asadzadeh

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 870
  • Country: ir
    • ASiD Designer
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #155 on: May 27, 2017, 05:35:30 am »
A MCU with integrated true bipolar ADC inputs, say +-10V and 16Bit plus and 500KSPS+ of course single supply device say 3.3V
A MCU with integrated RS485 PHY, with integrated  CAN PHY
A MCU with integrated Audio Codec
An ARM Cortex A with integrated  DRAM (more than 1GB) and from a know good brand not bullisht parts from Allwinner with out the real good support
A real good and easy to use OS for the Cortex A, and with easy to learn and ready to go mindset, most of us hate to learn Linux or there is not at least a good,easy to use and solid linux tutorial
A FPGA with lots of resources and affordable prices-- in this world they really need to make it affordable.
A good and reliable China part distributor like Arrow or digikey with price similar to Alibaba :)
A way or a machine to be able to cheaply produce plastic injection molds (under 1500$ or 1000$ )
And finally a real good Image sensor manufacturer without the bullisht  DNA and available parts and datasheets-- everybody know those bastards





« Last Edit: May 27, 2017, 05:37:11 am by ali_asadzadeh »
You can order parts from www.ASiDesigner.com
we are a wire-based company
 

Online technix

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 3216
  • Country: cn
  • From Shanghai With Love
    • My Untitled Blog
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #156 on: May 27, 2017, 06:16:43 am »
A MCU with integrated true bipolar ADC inputs, say +-10V and 16Bit plus and 500KSPS+ of course single supply device say 3.3V
STM32F373? Not true bipolar though sadly.
A MCU with integrated RS485 PHY, with integrated  CAN PHY
I have never heard of this.
A MCU with integrated Audio Codec
WCH CH563should fot this bill. p.s. That chip also have built-in Ethernet PHY and comes with a pre-assigned MAC.
An ARM Cortex A with integrated  DRAM (more than 1GB) and from a know good brand not bullisht parts from Allwinner with out the real good support
Octavo have some AM335x-based SIP that fits the bill. If you have problems with BGA, you can use AT91SAM9260 which comes in QFP208 and can use SDR SDRAM, which comes in TSOP packages.
A real good and easy to use OS for the Cortex A, and with easy to learn and ready to go mindset, most of us hate to learn Linux or there is not at least a good,easy to use and solid linux tutorial
Most vendors default to one flavor of Linux or another now (especially Android) since that is where the app developers are. Maybe it is time to embrace Linux on Cortex-A. Or contribute to this and this to clone Apple iOS. Or you can cook up your own OS.
A FPGA with lots of resources and affordable prices-- in this world they really need to make it affordable.
Cyclone IV?
A good and reliable China part distributor like Arrow or digikey with price similar to Alibaba :)
There isn't. Even natives have to navigate the complexity of Alibaba.
A way or a machine to be able to cheaply produce plastic injection molds (under 1500$ or 1000$ )
3D printing.
And finally a real good Image sensor manufacturer without the bullisht  DNA and available parts and datasheets-- everybody know those bastards
Ditto for display modules.
 

Offline Richard Crowley

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 4310
  • Country: us
  • KE7GKP
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #157 on: May 27, 2017, 07:06:38 am »
Replacement for LM3915/3916  Might be able to identify a tiny microcontroller that could be programmed to almost provide the same functionality(?)
 

Online Kjelt

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 5655
  • Country: nl
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #158 on: May 27, 2017, 07:17:44 am »
Quote
A MCU with integrated RS485 PHY
The ST Uarts do have a RS485 data enable signal but the driver it self is always extern. Because RS485 is often used in long distances and industrial environments it is not uncommon to see in industrial device this driver as a dip package in a socket so with damage it can be replaced.
 

Online ali_asadzadeh

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 870
  • Country: ir
    • ASiD Designer
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #159 on: May 27, 2017, 08:36:16 am »
technix
Thanks, but did you even read it carefully? STM32F373 it's not bipolar input!

Quote
I have never heard of this.
it's a wish list and I'm sure you never heard of it,

Quote
WCH CH563
Can we see the datasheet in English?

Quote
Cyclone IV?
Not affordable enough.

Quote
3D printing.
a plastic  injection is far superior to 3D printing rubbish ;)

Quote
Ditto for display modules.
what's Ditto? do you have a link? we need image sensors with real datasheet and availability
You can order parts from www.ASiDesigner.com
we are a wire-based company
 

Offline SeanB

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 15094
  • Country: za
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #160 on: May 27, 2017, 09:52:39 am »
Large-value (~10 uF) *medium* ESR ceramic capacitors. Most existing ones have frustratingly low ESR for bypassing applications.

Not if your control loop is properly designed. There are tons of LDO/SMPS controllers that can operate at nearly zero ESR, as long as they're designed properly.

What's that got to do with the price of fish? There are plenty of places one needs some bypassing (with the damping of moderate ESR) that are nowhere near a PSU or its control loop, or a control loop of any kind.

simply put a space for a zero ohm or whatever desired ESR value SMD resistor in series with the capacitor. Instant controllable ESR and also a test point, just costs a single resistor.
 

Offline David Hess

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 9902
  • Country: us
  • DavidH
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #161 on: May 27, 2017, 12:33:18 pm »
A MCU with integrated true bipolar ADC inputs, say +-10V and 16Bit plus and 500KSPS+ of course single supply device say 3.3V

That kind of resolution in a sampling ADC conflicts with having a noisy microcontroller in the same package.

Quote
A MCU with integrated RS485 PHY, with integrated  CAN PHY

It is less expensive to have a separate PHY because the most economical IC processes for microcontrollers do not support the interface voltages required.

Quote
A MCU with integrated Audio Codec

I thought they have these but I guess not.  Still, lots of microcontrollers can directly interface with cheap external audio codecs.

Quote
An ARM Cortex A with integrated  DRAM (more than 1GB) and from a know good brand not bullishit parts from Allwinner with out the real good support

Because high density DRAM processes are specialized, it is more economical to include the DRAM as a separate die in the same package like with the Raspberry Pi processor.
 
The following users thanked this post: Richard Crowley

Online technix

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 3216
  • Country: cn
  • From Shanghai With Love
    • My Untitled Blog
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #162 on: May 27, 2017, 03:28:16 pm »
technix
Thanks, but did you even read it carefully? STM32F373 it's not bipolar input!
I know. Sore point. Ouch.
Quote
I have never heard of this.
it's a wish list and I'm sure you never heard of it,
You get me.
Quote
WCH CH563
Can we see the datasheet in English?
I don't think they have one. If you need one I can ccok one up for you, but allow me to first cook up a board and give it a jog (I do have samples but not eval kits.)
Quote
Cyclone IV?
Not affordable enough.
Sadly. Maybe a Cyclone IV coupled to a STM32F103VE/Allwinner V3s?
Quote
3D printing.
a plastic  injection is far superior to 3D printing rubbish ;)
Making the mold costs a crazy lot of $$$. For one-off products you are more likely than not stuck to CNC and 3D printing.
Quote
Ditto for display modules.
what's Ditto? do you have a link? we need image sensors with real datasheet and availability
I mean that display module manufacturers have the same nasty habit of keeping their products shrouded in NDA. A lot of nice chips suffer from the same NDA problem (I am looking at you sir, ATECC508A.)
 

Offline helius

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 2853
  • Country: us
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #163 on: May 27, 2017, 04:01:42 pm »
a plastic  injection is far superior to 3D printing rubbish ;)
Making the mold costs a crazy lot of $$$. For one-off products you are more likely than not stuck to CNC and 3D printing.
You can sometimes 3d-print a mold when using spin casting. See http://www.stratasys.com/solutions/additive-manufacturing/tooling/spin-casting
It is not quite as flexible as injection molding but much cheaper.
 

Online BrianHG

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 2961
  • Country: ca
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #164 on: May 28, 2017, 03:17:53 am »
A MCU with integrated RS485 PHY, with integrated  CAN PHY

I used a PIC with comparitor inputs with series & termination resistors to protect the IOs from surge.  When in input mode, the 2 comparitor inputs act as a true authentic differential receiver, then to transmit, I switch the 2 comparitor inputs to outputs to create a differential line driver with microchip's +/-50ma per pin output drive.  Of course, I had to use a software serializer/de-serializer, but, with this, I had an 8 story apartment building with 20 shared addressable nodes temperature sensor/light control/alarm buttons running on phone wires at 19200 baud error free.
__________
BrianHG.
 

Offline jonovid

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 781
  • Country: au
    • JONOVID
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #165 on: July 05, 2017, 11:18:44 am »
convex OLED video screens for retro or reproduction video arcade machines.
the need for a 29” CRT Monitor emulator using convex 25"  - 29” OLED 800 x 600 video screen.
the OLED retro video screen needs to have the look and feel of a convex CRT Monitor without the weight or 1980s power consumption.

original CRT Monitor is preferred in a true reproduction of a arcade machine.

« Last Edit: July 05, 2017, 03:24:48 pm by jonovid »
Hobby of evil genius      basic knowledge of electronics
 

Offline coppice

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 4630
  • Country: gb
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #166 on: July 05, 2017, 01:43:06 pm »
Electrolytic Capacitors (i.e. low cost, relatively high capacitance value) which DON'T leak and/or significantly deteriorate, over a large number of years.

Tantalum and aluminum capacitors with solid polymer electrolyte are available. Well known types include Sanyo OS-CON and others.

Solid polymer electrolytic capacitors have their own wearout mechanism; the polymer degrades following the usual Arrhenius equation halving their operating lifetime for every 10C temperature rise.  Their big advantage is lower ESR yielding lower power dissipation and operating temperature.
Most motherboards using solid aluminium capacitors claim an operating life of 50k to 100k hours (5 to 10 years). I don't know what temperatures they are basing those estimates on. They don't seem to say.

When we first started using Philips solid aluminium caps for telecoms equipment, in the 80s, we were building for a minimum life of 15 years continuous operation with only passive cooling. Things could get pretty warm in some telephone exchanges.
The closest thing to an electrolytic capacitor which does not wear out is a solid or wet tantalum capacitor (1) but these have their own issues and high price.  In practice an almost arbitrarily long operating life can be gained using normal aluminum electrolytic or polymer electrolytic capacitors with suitable derating.

(1) And niobium oxide capacitors?
Tantalums have a long overall life, but both solid and wet ones are subject to occasional whisker shorts. With a beefy power supply these will self correct. With a very low capacity supply they may form a permanent short. Either way, they can make a telephone exchange crash, and were in fact found to be the main cause of such crashes. We first adopted solid aluminiums to avoid our exchange equipment hiccuping like that, and it did seem to be an effective cure.
 
The following users thanked this post: MK14

Online mariush

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 3767
  • Country: ro
  • .
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #167 on: July 05, 2017, 02:45:31 pm »
There's a different formula used to approximate life of polymer capacitors.  Can't use the electrolytic formula (double life for every 10c less)

Here's a link : http://www.illinoiscapacitor.com/tech-center/life-calculators.aspx

Polymer caps:



Radial/SMD electrolytic  (but like i said, you can simplify it to double life every 10c decrease):



 
The following users thanked this post: MK14, Neomys Sapiens

Online technix

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 3216
  • Country: cn
  • From Shanghai With Love
    • My Untitled Blog
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #168 on: July 07, 2017, 02:40:06 am »
I'd like to see a Zynq in a stacked RAM package.
Seconded. Accepting PoP packages or embedding chips as MCM isn't that hard, and thermals can be managed by embedding the RAM dies in the same way as those GPU chips with HBM memory.
 

Offline RobK_NL

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 250
  • Country: nl
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #169 on: July 07, 2017, 02:26:11 pm »
4. CdS cells - Is there really a problem with hermetically sealed CdS?
Plenty of them available
All the "NSL" types are hermetically sealed.
Tell us what problem you want to solve, not what solution you're having problems with
 

Offline GarthyD

  • Regular Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 81
  • Country: au
    • Adventures in Electronics
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #170 on: July 09, 2017, 02:57:19 am »
A few rambling thoughts:

- A runtime-reconfigurable CPLD. It starts up with the image last flashed via a dedicated programming connection (say, JTAG) to its internal flash. Groups of pins and cells can be locked into fixed configurations via security bits in the flash. It is through this initial image and a non-programming connection that you reconfigure the remaining cells (say, via SPI). The locking protects the runtime changes from being destructive, such as outputting on a pin that on your board goes to another output. Specification is open enough that you don't need a specialised tool to make these runtime changes.

- A conductor/insulator/conductor "sandwich" with a module coming out of the side that you could attach two jumper wires to. To use, you desolder an IC lead from its pad, insert the "sandwich", resolder, and now you can insert something in series between the IC lead and the pad (eg. to measure current). Bonus points if it comes with a tiny DIP switch that you can switch to keep it connected when not in use.

- Readily available extremely short 2.54mm female/female headers to adapt male headers/jumpers to male headers/jumpers, as well as allowing you to adapt a through-hole component to a male header pin where distance matters (eg. crystal, cap on a breakout board).

- A Surface mount 2.54mm male/female header that is insulated underneath, with a small side tab that you could solder to an existing populated SMT pad on a PCB, to add jumper-wire-friendly connection to a prototype PCB that you left out. I have no idea how you'd secure it for disconnections though.

- Minimal through-hole breakouts customised for each MCU produced with space to put caps and crystals optimally as standard. The design is released so anyone can make them. Purchasable assembled and unassembled.

- Some of the more interesting battery charger plus voltage regulator ICs with proper leads rather than being mostly leadless.

- Fully-assembled boost converter module as a through-hole component with no layout requirements. Five pins: In, out, ground, enable, and a resistor to set voltage.

- Small breadboard with no valley so that you can plug a two row 2.54mm connector directly into the middle via male headers and have connections heading outward from each individual pin.

- A breadboard that can grasp short pins.

- Jumper wire with small (eg. 22 ohm) series resistors located near either one or both ends.

- A small inexpensive reprogrammable eight-pin device that does nothing but apply a lookup table to a fixed number of input pins to produce output for a fixed number of output pins. Pins might be VCC, GND, three inputs, two outputs, programming pin. Like a small primitive CPLD.

- Power-pooling IC that accepts a few power sources and outputs uninterrupted power even as the sources are connected and disconnected. One source assumes a single-cell Li-Po and minimises the voltage drop. The battery source is isolated if the other sources are providing power. An output pin indicates if we are running from battery or not.

- An external power detect/LED IC for projects that use a battery. Overvoltage-protected input detects external power. Output (eg. to MCU) to indicate when external power is detected. Open drain output to connect to a LED. Input (eg. from MCU) that overrides the LED output, either on or off. IC is ultra-low-power when LED off and no external power.

- Shift register where every two bits controls what is connected to one pin: Either nothing, a weak pullup, or a weak pulldown.

- Inexpensive through-hole P-channel MOSFETS (if it's 6c for SOT-23, why am I paying $1.60 for something comparable through-hole?).

- A micro USB B connector with long leads for hand-soldering that is actually sold anywhere.

- Small SMT crystals with leads or at the very least hand-solderable pads on the side of decent size.

- A small surface-mount component (0603 or much smaller) that conducts as shipped but you can deliberately break the connection with a small tool, magnifier, and steady hand. Essentially a tiny dip switch with default on.

- A module that you can solder on to standard footprints that contains an upper module with the same footprint but with longer pads. ;)

- An adapter that has 2.54mm male header pins on one side (say, 2x5) and individually spring-loaded pins on the other that will make contact with a wide range of PCB hole sizes. The header pins then go to a cable. For testing before soldering real headers on.

- Jumper wire with one end having some kind of connector that lets you make secure, but temporary connections with a plated through-hole of various sizes *vertically* at most points on a PCB.

That was actually quite fun to write up. :) I'm sure quite a few of these exist already.
 

Online technix

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 3216
  • Country: cn
  • From Shanghai With Love
    • My Untitled Blog
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #171 on: July 09, 2017, 03:59:40 am »
A few rambling thoughts:

- A runtime-reconfigurable CPLD. It starts up with the image last flashed via a dedicated programming connection (say, JTAG) to its internal flash. Groups of pins and cells can be locked into fixed configurations via security bits in the flash. It is through this initial image and a non-programming connection that you reconfigure the remaining cells (say, via SPI). The locking protects the runtime changes from being destructive, such as outputting on a pin that on your board goes to another output. Specification is open enough that you don't need a specialised tool to make these runtime changes.

- A conductor/insulator/conductor "sandwich" with a module coming out of the side that you could attach two jumper wires to. To use, you desolder an IC lead from its pad, insert the "sandwich", resolder, and now you can insert something in series between the IC lead and the pad (eg. to measure current). Bonus points if it comes with a tiny DIP switch that you can switch to keep it connected when not in use.

- Readily available extremely short 2.54mm female/female headers to adapt male headers/jumpers to male headers/jumpers, as well as allowing you to adapt a through-hole component to a male header pin where distance matters (eg. crystal, cap on a breakout board).

- A Surface mount 2.54mm male/female header that is insulated underneath, with a small side tab that you could solder to an existing populated SMT pad on a PCB, to add jumper-wire-friendly connection to a prototype PCB that you left out. I have no idea how you'd secure it for disconnections though.

- Minimal through-hole breakouts customised for each MCU produced with space to put caps and crystals optimally as standard. The design is released so anyone can make them. Purchasable assembled and unassembled.

- Some of the more interesting battery charger plus voltage regulator ICs with proper leads rather than being mostly leadless.

- Fully-assembled boost converter module as a through-hole component with no layout requirements. Five pins: In, out, ground, enable, and a resistor to set voltage.

- Small breadboard with no valley so that you can plug a two row 2.54mm connector directly into the middle via male headers and have connections heading outward from each individual pin.

- A breadboard that can grasp short pins.

- Jumper wire with small (eg. 22 ohm) series resistors located near either one or both ends.

- A small inexpensive reprogrammable eight-pin device that does nothing but apply a lookup table to a fixed number of input pins to produce output for a fixed number of output pins. Pins might be VCC, GND, three inputs, two outputs, programming pin. Like a small primitive CPLD.

- Power-pooling IC that accepts a few power sources and outputs uninterrupted power even as the sources are connected and disconnected. One source assumes a single-cell Li-Po and minimises the voltage drop. The battery source is isolated if the other sources are providing power. An output pin indicates if we are running from battery or not.

- An external power detect/LED IC for projects that use a battery. Overvoltage-protected input detects external power. Output (eg. to MCU) to indicate when external power is detected. Open drain output to connect to a LED. Input (eg. from MCU) that overrides the LED output, either on or off. IC is ultra-low-power when LED off and no external power.

- Shift register where every two bits controls what is connected to one pin: Either nothing, a weak pullup, or a weak pulldown.

- Inexpensive through-hole P-channel MOSFETS (if it's 6c for SOT-23, why am I paying $1.60 for something comparable through-hole?).

- A micro USB B connector with long leads for hand-soldering that is actually sold anywhere.

- Small SMT crystals with leads or at the very least hand-solderable pads on the side of decent size.

- A small surface-mount component (0603 or much smaller) that conducts as shipped but you can deliberately break the connection with a small tool, magnifier, and steady hand. Essentially a tiny dip switch with default on.

- A module that you can solder on to standard footprints that contains an upper module with the same footprint but with longer pads. ;)

- An adapter that has 2.54mm male header pins on one side (say, 2x5) and individually spring-loaded pins on the other that will make contact with a wide range of PCB hole sizes. The header pins then go to a cable. For testing before soldering real headers on.

- Jumper wire with one end having some kind of connector that lets you make secure, but temporary connections with a plated through-hole of various sizes *vertically* at most points on a PCB.

That was actually quite fun to write up. :) I'm sure quite a few of these exist already.
I wonder if the MCP23S17 counts as a shift register with pin I/O controls? It is effectively two PIC16 parallel I/O blocks hooked to a SPI bus.
 
The following users thanked this post: GarthyD

Offline bjcuizon

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 284
  • Country: nz
  • RF and Analog Electronics Enthusiast
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #172 on: July 09, 2017, 04:39:59 am »
An 0805 smd resistor with 2W power handling and an electrolytic cap that doesn't die in any way possible.
Don't mess with an Electronics Engineer, it Megahertz!
 

Online technix

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 3216
  • Country: cn
  • From Shanghai With Love
    • My Untitled Blog
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #173 on: July 09, 2017, 04:56:30 am »
An 0805 smd resistor with 2W power handling and an electrolytic cap that doesn't die in any way possible.
Just add heatsinks.
 

Offline GarthyD

  • Regular Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 81
  • Country: au
    • Adventures in Electronics
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #174 on: July 09, 2017, 05:25:58 am »
- Shift register where every two bits controls what is connected to one pin: Either nothing, a weak pullup, or a weak pulldown.
I wonder if the MCP23S17 counts as a shift register with pin I/O controls? It is effectively two PIC16 parallel I/O blocks hooked to a SPI bus.

Thanks for the suggestion. A GPIO expander would certainly solve the same problems, and the MCP23S17 certainly covers the pull-up side of the equation. Or, use the outputs and add a suitable resistor and use it to pull in either direction.

I think my ideal component in this case would be one that just had configurable pull-ups and pull-downs and had a price to match. Something simpler and cheaper than a full GPIO expander but a bit more flexible than a fixed pullup/down resistor.

 

Offline bjcuizon

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 284
  • Country: nz
  • RF and Analog Electronics Enthusiast
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #175 on: July 09, 2017, 05:48:53 am »
Just add heatsinks.

Could be, but how about space restraints? ???
Don't mess with an Electronics Engineer, it Megahertz!
 

Offline Cerebus

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 3396
  • Country: gb
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #176 on: July 09, 2017, 10:01:17 pm »
- A runtime-reconfigurable CPLD. It starts up with the image last flashed via a dedicated programming connection (say, JTAG) to its internal flash. Groups of pins and cells can be locked into fixed configurations via security bits in the flash. It is through this initial image and a non-programming connection that you reconfigure the remaining cells (say, via SPI). The locking protects the runtime changes from being destructive, such as outputting on a pin that on your board goes to another output. Specification is open enough that you don't need a specialised tool to make these runtime changes.

Something quite close to what you describe could be realised with the 'warmboot' feature of Lattice' iCE40 FPGAs.
Anybody got a syringe I can use to squeeze the magic smoke back into this?
 
The following users thanked this post: GarthyD

Offline MLXXXp

  • Regular Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 221
  • Country: ca
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #177 on: July 09, 2017, 10:50:38 pm »
- An adapter that has 2.54mm male header pins on one side (say, 2x5) and individually spring-loaded pins on the other that will make contact with a wide range of PCB hole sizes. The header pins then go to a cable. For testing before soldering real headers on.

- Jumper wire with one end having some kind of connector that lets you make secure, but temporary connections with a plated through-hole of various sizes *vertically* at most points on a PCB.

These ideas are similar to the reusable solderless headers that I wish existed.
https://www.eevblog.com/forum/projects/components-you-wish-existed-88167/msg1206329/?topicseen#msg1206329
 

Offline forrestc

  • Supporter
  • ****
  • Posts: 504
  • Country: us
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #178 on: July 09, 2017, 11:43:35 pm »
I'd like an input protection IC with a circuit like the following:

Back to back depletion-mode mosfets for active current limiting.   Aka the circuit in figure 4.  http://ww1.microchip.com/downloads/en/AppNotes/AN-D66.pdf
and on the 'protected' side:
Transisitor clamps to VCC and GND arranged to burn the excess voltage/current off as heat instead of just shunting the current to the rails.     

All in one package:  In, Out, Vcc, Gnd. 

I can do the above with discretes, but there are numerous reasons why it would be better all in one package.

Bonus for multiple circuits in the same package.

 

Offline GarthyD

  • Regular Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 81
  • Country: au
    • Adventures in Electronics
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #179 on: July 10, 2017, 12:00:55 am »
- A runtime-reconfigurable CPLD. It starts up with the image last flashed via a dedicated programming connection (say, JTAG) to its internal flash. Groups of pins and cells can be locked into fixed configurations via security bits in the flash. It is through this initial image and a non-programming connection that you reconfigure the remaining cells (say, via SPI). The locking protects the runtime changes from being destructive, such as outputting on a pin that on your board goes to another output. Specification is open enough that you don't need a specialised tool to make these runtime changes.

Something quite close to what you describe could be realised with the 'warmboot' feature of Lattice' iCE40 FPGAs.

The iCE40 FPGAs are seriously close to ticking all of the boxes here. Thankyou for the excellent suggestion. :) I was wondering if I needed to start wandering into FPGA territory for this sort of functionality.

I was thinking they'd have no leaded variants or would be way too expensive to justify, but I was wrong on both counts: A iCE40HX1K-VQ100 TQFP-100 is about AUD$6.83/USD$5.19 (Mouser). Or AU$8.54 (RS) if I get impatient.

There is an application I'm looking at for the future the could use this and I absolutely will be looking at these when the time comes. For the cost, I might even throw one in my next order just to play with for fun.

In the meantime I've got some interesting reading to do. :)

- An adapter that has 2.54mm male header pins on one side (say, 2x5) and individually spring-loaded pins on the other that will make contact with a wide range of PCB hole sizes. The header pins then go to a cable. For testing before soldering real headers on.

- Jumper wire with one end having some kind of connector that lets you make secure, but temporary connections with a plated through-hole of various sizes *vertically* at most points on a PCB.

These ideas are similar to the reusable solderless headers that I wish existed.
https://www.eevblog.com/forum/projects/components-you-wish-existed-88167/msg1206329/?topicseen#msg1206329


They sound fantastic. I'd love to have had a few of your reusable headers in the prototype board I've just built. Snap in to do testing and measurements, snap out to do some component soldering, and repeat until board is built and the real headers are in.
« Last Edit: July 10, 2017, 01:42:06 am by GarthyD »
 

Offline PointyOintment

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 326
  • Country: ca
  • ↑ I scanned my face
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #180 on: August 04, 2017, 04:46:54 am »
- A conductor/insulator/conductor "sandwich" with a module coming out of the side that you could attach two jumper wires to. To use, you desolder an IC lead from its pad, insert the "sandwich", resolder, and now you can insert something in series between the IC lead and the pad (eg. to measure current). Bonus points if it comes with a tiny DIP switch that you can switch to keep it connected when not in use.
Are there FFCs with double-sided ends? What I mean by that is that the contacts on one side of the end of the FFC go to different traces than the contacts on the other side of the same end. If those exist, you could cut them up and use them for that purpose.

- Fully-assembled boost converter module as a through-hole component with no layout requirements. Five pins: In, out, ground, enable, and a resistor to set voltage.
https://www.digikey.com/products/en/power-supplies-board-mount/dc-dc-converters/922

- Power-pooling IC that accepts a few power sources and outputs uninterrupted power even as the sources are connected and disconnected. One source assumes a single-cell Li-Po and minimises the voltage drop. The battery source is isolated if the other sources are providing power. An output pin indicates if we are running from battery or not.
Those are called "power multiplexers", I think. Pololu sells one or two on breakout boards.

- Shift register where every two bits controls what is connected to one pin: Either nothing, a weak pullup, or a weak pulldown.
Use a tri-state shift register, and put resistors in series with its outputs?

- A small surface-mount component (0603 or much smaller) that conducts as shipped but you can deliberately break the connection with a small tool, magnifier, and steady hand. Essentially a tiny dip switch with default on.
Solder jumper?

- An adapter that has 2.54mm male header pins on one side (say, 2x5) and individually spring-loaded pins on the other that will make contact with a wide range of PCB hole sizes. The header pins then go to a cable. For testing before soldering real headers on.

- Jumper wire with one end having some kind of connector that lets you make secure, but temporary connections with a plated through-hole of various sizes *vertically* at most points on a PCB.
Tag Connect or Tag-Connect—seems they can't decide if it should be hyphenated or not—is the closest thing I know of to those ideas.
 
The following users thanked this post: GarthyD

Offline GarthyD

  • Regular Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 81
  • Country: au
    • Adventures in Electronics
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #181 on: August 04, 2017, 08:31:39 am »
- A conductor/insulator/conductor "sandwich" with a module coming out of the side that you could attach two jumper wires to. To use, you desolder an IC lead from its pad, insert the "sandwich", resolder, and now you can insert something in series between the IC lead and the pad (eg. to measure current). Bonus points if it comes with a tiny DIP switch that you can switch to keep it connected when not in use.
Are there FFCs with double-sided ends? What I mean by that is that the contacts on one side of the end of the FFC go to different traces than the contacts on the other side of the same end. If those exist, you could cut them up and use them for that purpose.

That's a really interesting idea. I've done little with the connectors on flat cables so I wouldn't be sure where to start, but perhaps such a connector exists that would somehow allow it to be attached in that way.

- Fully-assembled boost converter module as a through-hole component with no layout requirements. Five pins: In, out, ground, enable, and a resistor to set voltage.
https://www.digikey.com/products/en/power-supplies-board-mount/dc-dc-converters/922

I had a lot of trouble finding one that definitely converted voltage upward and thought you might have been mistaken. However, after some digging I was able to find some that definitely did. Some more digging in the higher price ranges yielded packages with both through-hole and surface mount (with leads). I didn't find one with every characteristic, but I found a few that were awfully close. I blame the search tools, the suggestion was great. :)

A search for "step-up" and "boost" in a few stores that do breakout boards yielded some results that ticks all the boxes apart from being a fully-assembled module (although the last point could be argued).

- Power-pooling IC that accepts a few power sources and outputs uninterrupted power even as the sources are connected and disconnected. One source assumes a single-cell Li-Po and minimises the voltage drop. The battery source is isolated if the other sources are providing power. An output pin indicates if we are running from battery or not.
Those are called "power multiplexers", I think. Pololu sells one or two on breakout boards.

And so they are! That's the problem I run into a lot. I can describe the type of thing I want but it's hard to find it without knowing what it is actually called. Thanks for pointing me in the right direction.

- Shift register where every two bits controls what is connected to one pin: Either nothing, a weak pullup, or a weak pulldown.
Use a tri-state shift register, and put resistors in series with its outputs?

Heck, that's seriously close. I didn't know there were tri-state shift registers. :O Now, an all that is left is an all-in-one package with the resistors included.

- A small surface-mount component (0603 or much smaller) that conducts as shipped but you can deliberately break the connection with a small tool, magnifier, and steady hand. Essentially a tiny dip switch with default on.
Solder jumper?

Do you mean solder over a point, and desolder to break? I was thinking more along the lines of something that someone without an iron could safely break if they wanted to. Perhaps like a surface mount resistor but with a conductive middle segment sitting on a nonconductive base that you can push out of the component. Or something with a tiny, tiny switch that you can flick maybe a dozen times before it breaks. Or something that comes with a small wire in it that you can slice with a small blade.

- An adapter that has 2.54mm male header pins on one side (say, 2x5) and individually spring-loaded pins on the other that will make contact with a wide range of PCB hole sizes. The header pins then go to a cable. For testing before soldering real headers on.

- Jumper wire with one end having some kind of connector that lets you make secure, but temporary connections with a plated through-hole of various sizes *vertically* at most points on a PCB.
Tag Connect or Tag-Connect—seems they can't decide if it should be hyphenated or not—is the closest thing I know of to those ideas.

Kind of, but without the requirement of putting in extra holes to match the connector. The sort of thing which you could build yourself by attaching ribbon wires to a set of pogo pins offset by 2.54mm with pointy or mildly-rounded ends (matching any hole size) and attach the other end to an IDC cable. Except without the building it yourself part, just jump straight to the part where I buy the already-assembled cable. :)

...

Thankyou, wish-granting electronics genie. :)

Seriously: Thankyou for the excellent suggestions and starting points. :)
 

Offline dr.diesel

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 2124
  • Country: us
  • Cramming the magic smoke back in...
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #182 on: October 04, 2017, 02:57:00 pm »
Small single interface (I2C, SPI, whatever) multi gang environmental sensor:

 - Barometric pressure, humidity, altitude, temp
 - Complete 9 DOF IMU (accelerometer, magnetometer and gyroscope) with available post processing built in
 - CO, O2, NH3, H2S, NO2, HF, SO2, CL2, O3, C2H4, CH3O, ETO, N2, HCL (Probably missed a few)
 - Combustible Gas (all of the *tane's, *anol's, *tone's etc)

All with appropriate PPM/PPB where applicable.

Since I'm wishing let's toss in a ~1cm accurate > 50hz GPS, with external antenna port.

Something size suitable for IoT, phones, small robotics etc.


Offline asmi

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 788
  • Country: ca
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #183 on: October 04, 2017, 03:49:14 pm »
I would love to have affordable bridge IC CSI/DSI<-> Parallel 24bit RGB. CSI/DSI IP cores for FPGA costs a fortune, as well as in most cases require external circuitry to make MIPI signals electrically compatible with FPGA IO :rant:
 

Offline asmi

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 788
  • Country: ca
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #184 on: October 04, 2017, 03:52:43 pm »
- Barometric pressure, humidity, altitude, temp
BME280: https://www.digikey.ca/product-detail/en/bosch-sensortec/BME280/828-1063-1-ND/6136314

- CO, O2, NH3, H2S, NO2, HF, SO2, CL2, O3, C2H4, CH3O, ETO, N2, HCL (Probably missed a few)
 - Combustible Gas (all of the *tane's, *anol's, *tone's etc)
That would be huge and cost a fortune.
Something size suitable for IoT, phones, small robotics etc.
BME280 is 2x2 mm I believe, most 6DOF chips are also in that ballpark.
 

Offline xani

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 364
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #185 on: October 04, 2017, 03:55:26 pm »
I also would like to make a tricorder  ;D
to add, affordable (<$50 each)
  • thermal camera
  • wide-range optic spectrum analyzer,  200(UVA/B) to 1800(to cover various fiber flavours)
  • mini mass spectrometer

- An adapter that has 2.54mm male header pins on one side (say, 2x5) and individually spring-loaded pins on the other that will make contact with a wide range of PCB hole sizes. The header pins then go to a cable. For testing before soldering real headers on.

- Jumper wire with one end having some kind of connector that lets you make secure, but temporary connections with a plated through-hole of various sizes *vertically* at most points on a PCB.

These ideas are similar to the reusable solderless headers that I wish existed.
https://www.eevblog.com/forum/projects/components-you-wish-existed-88167/msg1206329/?topicseen#msg1206329

Wouldn't just a bunch of pogo pins + some way of clamping it to hold it in place be enough ?.

I did something similiar once for AVR isp header and it was basically a isp header breakout board with pogo pins + another one few mm below to make it rigid (basically a sandwich of 2 boards with some spacing).

Basically i could press it to unpopulared ISP header and press program to program the chip
 

Offline dr.diesel

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 2124
  • Country: us
  • Cramming the magic smoke back in...
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #186 on: October 04, 2017, 03:57:39 pm »
- Barometric pressure, humidity, altitude, temp
BME280: https://www.digikey.ca/product-detail/en/bosch-sensortec/BME280/828-1063-1-ND/6136314

- CO, O2, NH3, H2S, NO2, HF, SO2, CL2, O3, C2H4, CH3O, ETO, N2, HCL (Probably missed a few)
 - Combustible Gas (all of the *tane's, *anol's, *tone's etc)
That would be huge and cost a fortune.
Something size suitable for IoT, phones, small robotics etc.
BME280 is 2x2 mm I believe, most 6DOF chips are also in that ballpark.

yeah, i'm wishing, and want it all in a single package, single interface.

Online BrianHG

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 2961
  • Country: ca
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #187 on: October 04, 2017, 04:39:06 pm »
as well as in most cases require external circuitry to make MIPI signals electrically compatible with FPGA IO :rant:

To put it more precisely:

I would like an affordable FPGA with multiple 50 gigabit transceivers with built in differential receiver with cable length equalizers and programmable signal level differential cable drivers to accommodate all high speed differential buses directly, not just MIPI, but USB3.1, 10G Ethernet, SDI, HDMI, Display Port, ect...

The darn cable length equalizers are the nasty thing which usually requires an analog circuit...
__________
BrianHG.
 

Offline westfw

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 3027
  • Country: us
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #188 on: October 05, 2017, 12:03:16 am »
User-programmable USB device chip in the same price class (and physical size) as CH340g...
 

Offline NiHaoMike

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 5539
  • Country: us
  • "Don't turn it on - Take it apart!"
    • Facebook Page
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #189 on: October 05, 2017, 03:12:34 am »
A multiple input LDO that uses the lowest voltage input still able to achieve the set output voltage. The main use case being a device that has (for example) a 12V input and a 5V buck regulator that is only only some of the time. It also needs an always on 3.3V at a current too low to justify having a buck converter, but of which having the capability to regulate from the 5V rail when it is on gives a worthwhile power savings.
Cryptocurrency has taught me to love math and at the same time be baffled by it.

Cryptocurrency lesson 0: Altcoins and Bitcoin are not the same thing.
 

Online technix

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 3216
  • Country: cn
  • From Shanghai With Love
    • My Untitled Blog
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #190 on: October 05, 2017, 05:51:56 am »
A multiple input LDO that uses the lowest voltage input still able to achieve the set output voltage. The main use case being a device that has (for example) a 12V input and a 5V buck regulator that is only only some of the time. It also needs an always on 3.3V at a current too low to justify having a buck converter, but of which having the capability to regulate from the 5V rail when it is on gives a worthwhile power savings.
I would prefer the bypassable switcher approach (a switch mode regulator that have a bypass mode forcing the switching element on.) This way if you don’t need the 5V rail, you can shut most of it down with a MOSFET and bypass the regulator and force 12V out to the “5V” rail.
 

Offline Jeroen3

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 3279
  • Country: nl
  • Embedded Engineer
    • jeroen3.nl
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #191 on: October 05, 2017, 07:11:15 am »
Look for 100% duty cycle switchers. They exist!

I would like serial memory (fram/flash/eeprom) that you can map to memory with read and write capability. Like you can with many parallel memory interfaces or quad-spi (read only).

 

Online technix

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 3216
  • Country: cn
  • From Shanghai With Love
    • My Untitled Blog
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #192 on: October 06, 2017, 02:25:22 am »
Look for 100% duty cycle switchers. They exist!

I would like serial memory (fram/flash/eeprom) that you can map to memory with read and write capability. Like you can with many parallel memory interfaces or quad-spi (read only).
That existed for a while and died: Fully Buffered DIMM.
 

Offline cdev

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 5082
  • Country: 00
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #193 on: October 06, 2017, 03:32:11 am »
a navspark mini could likely interface with the bme280 and maybe some of the others and its GPS is in my experience quite accurate.. and its only around $7

will do 20 hz its one of the faster GPSs

Small single interface (I2C, SPI, whatever) multi gang environmental sensor:


 - Barometric pressure, humidity, altitude, temp
 - Complete 9 DOF IMU (accelerometer, magnetometer and gyroscope) with available post processing built in
 - CO, O2, NH3, H2S, NO2, HF, SO2, CL2, O3, C2H4, CH3O, ETO, N2, HCL (Probably missed a few)
 - Combustible Gas (all of the *tane's, *anol's, *tone's etc)

All with appropriate PPM/PPB where applicable.

Since I'm wishing let's toss in a ~1cm accurate > 50hz GPS, with external antenna port.

Something size suitable for IoT, phones, small robotics etc.


"What the large print giveth, the small print taketh away."
 

Offline Jeroen3

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 3279
  • Country: nl
  • Embedded Engineer
    • jeroen3.nl
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #194 on: October 06, 2017, 07:01:32 am »
...
That existed for a while and died: Fully Buffered DIMM.
I think there could be a market for say, ST, selling micro-controllers and memory IC that can be memory mapped instead of used with a software layer.
 

Offline asmi

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 788
  • Country: ca
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #195 on: October 06, 2017, 01:04:41 pm »
I think there could be a market for say, ST, selling micro-controllers and memory IC that can be memory mapped instead of used with a software layer.
Many MCUs have external bus interfaces, and some even have SDRAM/DDR memory controllers.
 

Offline Jeroen3

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 3279
  • Country: nl
  • Embedded Engineer
    • jeroen3.nl
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #196 on: October 06, 2017, 02:16:06 pm »
Yes I know. For large footprint IC's, with a large number of lines.
How about a memory mapped soic8 flash with only 3 lines that you can write to?
 

Offline asmi

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 788
  • Country: ca
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #197 on: October 06, 2017, 07:00:06 pm »
Yes I know. For large footprint IC's, with a large number of lines.
How about a memory mapped soic8 flash with only 3 lines that you can write to?
How do you see this implemented over 3 lines? Without dedicated address lines any implementation will be incredibly slow, which kinda defeats the purpose of RAM as fast "scratch" memory space.
Besides, there are (Q-)SPI RAM chips out there, so perhaps they can be used to implement it somehow, but like I said, I don't really see utility for RAM which is that slow, unless you use huge bursts to amortise command/address phase.
Also there are HyperRAM chips from Cypress, which do provide up to 333 MB/s of bandwidth over just 11 or 12 lines, I used a couple of them on my FPGA board, but real achieved bandwidth heavily depends on access pattern - if you attempt to use it as RAM (as in random access memory), the bandwidth will be horrible as command/address phase takes 10 to 18 clock cycles, so you will need to use loooong bursts to get anywhere near theoretical 333 MB/s BW (it uses 166.667 MHz DDR interface over 8 DQ lines).
« Last Edit: October 06, 2017, 07:40:26 pm by asmi »
 

Offline GarthyD

  • Regular Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 81
  • Country: au
    • Adventures in Electronics
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #198 on: October 06, 2017, 10:25:16 pm »
- An adapter that has 2.54mm male header pins on one side (say, 2x5) and individually spring-loaded pins on the other that will make contact with a wide range of PCB hole sizes. The header pins then go to a cable. For testing before soldering real headers on.

- Jumper wire with one end having some kind of connector that lets you make secure, but temporary connections with a plated through-hole of various sizes *vertically* at most points on a PCB.

These ideas are similar to the reusable solderless headers that I wish existed.
https://www.eevblog.com/forum/projects/components-you-wish-existed-88167/msg1206329/?topicseen#msg1206329

Wouldn't just a bunch of pogo pins + some way of clamping it to hold it in place be enough ?.

I did something similiar once for AVR isp header and it was basically a isp header breakout board with pogo pins + another one few mm below to make it rigid (basically a sandwich of 2 boards with some spacing).

Basically i could press it to unpopulared ISP header and press program to program the chip

That sounds like something that could be built that is functionally close. I don't suppose you remember the specific pogo pins you used? Did they handle holes that house 2.54" headers? I'd like to investigate them if so and you remember.

Yes I know. For large footprint IC's, with a large number of lines.
How about a memory mapped soic8 flash with only 3 lines that you can write to?

The SAM70 series (http://ww1.microchip.com/downloads/en/DeviceDoc/Atmel-11242-32-bit-Cortex-M7-Microcontroller-SAM-S70Q-SAM-S70N-SAM-S70J_Datasheet.pdf) does memory mapped quad SPI with XIP (ie. run code direct from it), and if you used FRAM (8-pin) you've got fast non-volatile storage. It isn't exactly what you've asked for, but it does tick a lot of boxes. Haven't tried it myself but had planned to.

Imagine that backed with hardware cache. I bet one of the high-end ARMS does it.
« Last Edit: October 07, 2017, 05:30:08 am by GarthyD »
 
The following users thanked this post: Jeroen3

Offline Etesla

  • Regular Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 51
  • Country: us
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #199 on: October 12, 2017, 07:49:03 pm »
Flux Capacitor
 

Offline Neomys Sapiens

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 1213
  • Country: de
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #200 on: October 12, 2017, 10:30:59 pm »
A little box, containing the necessary components for making modular rotary switches for ALL the options that are possible (normal break-before-make, make-before-break, and shorting (all up to the current position).
For PCB and free mounted ones, in a high quality and reliability version. Also momentary with return, two steps on each side, and coaxial ones.
 

Offline coppice

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 4630
  • Country: gb
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #201 on: October 13, 2017, 09:32:12 am »
A little box, containing the necessary components for making modular rotary switches for ALL the options that are possible (normal break-before-make, make-before-break, and shorting (all up to the current position).
For PCB and free mounted ones, in a high quality and reliability version. Also momentary with return, two steps on each side, and coaxial ones.
Kits like that were common in the 60s and 70s. I haven't seen one for decades, though.
 

Offline precaud

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 486
  • Country: us
    • LinearZ
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #202 on: October 13, 2017, 01:48:40 pm »
Passive components that combine resistance and defined inductance. We could call them reductors or some other clever name. Resistance in the 1mOhm to 100mOhm range, inductance in the nH to uH range. Example: I could order a reductor with 4.7mOhm and 330nH. Or 10mOhm with 750nH.
 

Offline Neomys Sapiens

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 1213
  • Country: de
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #203 on: October 13, 2017, 07:57:01 pm »
I know those kits. But they don't produce rotary switches as nice as the ready-made ones and they always leave out some options. Most were low-to-medium quality and had open contacts.
 

Offline alexanderbrevig

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 583
  • Country: no
  • Musician, programmer and EE hobbyist
    • alexanderbrevig.com
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #204 on: November 07, 2017, 08:17:24 am »
I'm going nuts looking for this.

I have a PCB with an LCD close to the front panel, and I need to have a 1/4" jack on that same panel. I can of course route out a hole for a panel mount jack and then wire it up but seem so wasteful as it's an extra manual (expensive) step in assembly.

Online blueskull

  • Supporter
  • ****
  • Posts: 12335
  • Country: cn
  • Power Electronics Guy
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #205 on: November 07, 2017, 08:25:32 am »
ARM Cortex A with relatively large co-packaged RAM without needing to sign NDA (unlike Samsung/Qualcomm phone PoP chips). ETH PHY, USB PHY and PMIC integration is also welcomed.
Something like AllWinner v3s with larger RAM and more beefy CPU (say, quad A7 or quad A53), preferably in 0.8mm or larger pitch BGA.
In other words, OSD3358 with a modern CPU core and a Chinese price.
 

Online RES

  • Regular Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 77
  • Country: 00
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #206 on: November 07, 2017, 08:29:04 pm »
3 mm RGB LED with four leads at the bottom (not in one line, but one on each "corner", in square) of the dome and without edge (with a dot for cathode/anode indication) Can only find these 3 mm RGB LEDs with the leads in line and without round shape.
« Last Edit: November 07, 2017, 08:52:19 pm by RES »
 

Online technix

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 3216
  • Country: cn
  • From Shanghai With Love
    • My Untitled Blog
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #207 on: November 09, 2017, 07:44:42 am »
3 mm RGB LED with four leads at the bottom (not in one line, but one on each "corner", in square) of the dome and without edge (with a dot for cathode/anode indication) Can only find these 3 mm RGB LEDs with the leads in line and without round shape.

Surface mounted ones may work.
 

Offline ikrase

  • Regular Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 139
  • Country: us
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #208 on: January 02, 2018, 06:00:56 am »
- Plated through hole edge connector proto board for an economical price. (I may just end up having this manufactured. Vectorboard Plugbords cost at least 25 dollars each, but the cheapest fabs I know of will make them in quantity 100 for under 5 dollars a board, I think.)

- Cheap tightly regulated 24 volt DC/DC supplies with 10 kV isolation. Something with some of those features exists, just not all of them. Have actually ended up deciding to buy stacks of cheap DIN rail supplies, which have 3 kV isolation, instead. May end up going to 60 Hertz Hell.


- <10 femtoampere leakage current gas discharge tube voltage limiters

- 1 kilovolt high speed (but stable at unity gain and DC) op-amps.

- Actually good high-current-output op-amps

- Cortex M4F microcontroller, in DIP package, with built in USB and JTAG, and with minimal GPIO but a high-speed/high-bandwidth/moderate-distance bus (multiple lines of high-speed RS485 maybe?), and the ability to connect to arbitrary IO modules also in DIP package (UART, SPI ,I2C, GPIO, 8-bit sub-processor, small patch of FPGA fabric, etc).  Kinda like a modular PLC, but for much lower-level software and hardware.

- Single chip, non-tiny-package, military temperature range multi-cell complete Li-ion charger/controller unit that handles the complete combo of: Cell protection, high speed charging, trickle (solar) charging, gas gauging, and output disconnect. I am amazed that Sparkfun does not sell any such device.


- Automagical tri-state bidirectional output buffer / input limiter / level shifter / isolator pack.

- Lithium battery packs with similar market penetration to the AA battery

- A truly rail-to-rail op-amp (maybe with internal charge pump...)

- Spray-on IP65 Rating for switches and connectors

- Ceramic or PEEK UHV compatible Mini DIN connectors. (Something similar does exist, the "Sub-C" connector, but very expensive, overly complicated w/ crimp pins, and rather bulky.)

- Peltier modules with efficiency befitting a solid-state device.

- MLC protoboard

- A material that has the consistency of modelling clay when supplied but hardens into a polymer with temperature and outgassing properties similar to PEEK. (I made something like this by mixing Loctite/Hysol 1C epoxy with powdered plaster-like ceramic potting compound. It kinda worked.)

- Room Temperature Vulcanizing Viton rubber

- Paint-on / Dip-on Thermionic Cathode Coating. I know that something approaching this existed in the heyday of vacuum tubes, but supposedly it didn't work very well.
 

Online BrianHG

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 2961
  • Country: ca
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #209 on: January 02, 2018, 07:15:08 am »
- A truly rail-to-rail op-amp (maybe with internal charge pump...)
tidu018 < at least for the GND side.

As for your other opamps, check out apexanalog's PWM opamps for high current, but is costs big $.
__________
BrianHG.
 

Online blueskull

  • Supporter
  • ****
  • Posts: 12335
  • Country: cn
  • Power Electronics Guy
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #210 on: January 02, 2018, 07:36:16 am »
- A truly rail-to-rail op-amp (maybe with internal charge pump...)

OPA365
 

Online BrianHG

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 2961
  • Country: ca
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #211 on: January 02, 2018, 07:53:05 am »
- A truly rail-to-rail op-amp (maybe with internal charge pump...)

OPA365
I stand corrected...  My listed tidu018 is a reference design app note for the OPA365....  However, to achieve the true-GND with the OPA365, you need a pull-down resistor.  So, the device still gets soooo close....

__________
BrianHG.
 

Offline Cerebus

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 3396
  • Country: gb
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #212 on: January 03, 2018, 12:00:01 am »
- Plated through hole edge...
...supposedly it didn't work very well.

You forgot "a pony", and "the moon on a stick".  :)
Anybody got a syringe I can use to squeeze the magic smoke back into this?
 

Offline forrestc

  • Supporter
  • ****
  • Posts: 504
  • Country: us
Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #213 on: January 04, 2018, 06:20:39 am »
- A truly rail-to-rail op-amp (maybe with internal charge pump...)

OPA365

LTC1152 perhaps?  From the datasheet: "the input CMR actually extends beyond either rail by about 0.3V".   The output seems to be fairly high impedance though...   

I know there's quite a few opamps out there using various versions of this design.   Personally, I find that rail-to-rail inputs aren't all that necessary anymore since I'm mostly using opamps as buffers for ADC's, and I can pretty much always use an inverting topology which essentially eliminates the need for rail-to-rail inputs.   Rail-to-rail outputs are much more critical since most ADC's measure from ground to Vref.





 


Share me

Digg  Facebook  SlashDot  Delicious  Technorati  Twitter  Google  Yahoo
Smf