Author Topic: Components you wish existed.  (Read 36490 times)

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Offline MK14

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Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #150 on: May 27, 2017, 11:47:24 am »
Electrolytic Capacitors (i.e. low cost, relatively high capacitance value) which DON'T leak and/or significantly deteriorate, over a large number of years.

Tantalum and aluminum capacitors with solid polymer electrolyte are available. Well known types include Sanyo OS-CON and others.

Solid polymer electrolytic capacitors have their own wearout mechanism; the polymer degrades following the usual Arrhenius equation halving their operating lifetime for every 10C temperature rise.  Their big advantage is lower ESR yielding lower power dissipation and operating temperature.

The closest thing to an electrolytic capacitor which does not wear out is a solid or wet tantalum capacitor (1) but these have their own issues and high price.  In practice an almost arbitrarily long operating life can be gained using normal aluminum electrolytic or polymer electrolytic capacitors with suitable derating.

(1) And niobium oxide capacitors?

Thanks. Improving the life expectancy by suitably derating the component, is a very useful tip.
(If I remember correctly) suitable derating can mean Tantulums (especially modern ones, WITHOUT the possibility of them overheating and maybe catching on fire), can last virtually forever. But they tend to be pricey.

It's a pity that unlike resistors, which can often just be specified in terms of value, tolerance, max working voltage and power rating (for the bulk of applications). Capacitors came in a large number of varieties and choosing the right one, is not always that easy.

I wonder if in 10 or 50 years time, we will see super capacitors, replace rechargeable batteries, in most applications.
 

Online David Hess

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Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #151 on: May 27, 2017, 11:50:44 am »
Electrolytic Capacitors (i.e. low cost, relatively high capacitance value) which DON'T leak and/or significantly deteriorate, over a large number of years.

Tantalum and aluminum capacitors with solid polymer electrolyte are available. Well known types include Sanyo OS-CON and others.

They seem to be popular, on better quality motherboards.
At the very least, they get rid of the possibility of the liquid electrolyte leaking, since it would then be solid.

The only reason they use them is for their low ESR yielding a high ripple current rating at a given cost.  It became impractical to fit enough aluminum electrolytic capacitors in the area needed to get a low enough ESR and ceramic capacitors would be more expensive.

They are great capacitors but the motherboard makers use them because they are the least expensive solution.
 

Online David Hess

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Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #152 on: May 27, 2017, 12:09:33 pm »
Thanks. Improving the life expectancy by suitably derating the component, is a very useful tip.
(If I remember correctly) suitable derating can mean Tantulums (especially modern ones, WITHOUT the possibility of them overheating and maybe catching on fire), can last virtually forever. But they tend to be pricey.

Voltage derating would have made a difference with old solid tantalum capacitors but they were initially marketed as not requiring voltage derating unlike aluminum electrolytic capacitors.  In practice voltage derating them to between 1/2 and 2/3rds can reduce the failure rate to essentially zero excluding surge related failures and voltage derating helps with those also.

Quote
It's a pity that unlike resistors, which can often just be specified in terms of value, tolerance, max working voltage and power rating (for the bulk of applications). Capacitors came in a large number of varieties and choosing the right one, is not always that easy.

ESR and ripple current rating of capacitors were ignored for a long time simply because they were irrelevant in most applications.  That changed when switching power supplies became common.

In a linear or non-active power factor switching regulator, once you have enough input capacitance after the bridge rectifier, you have way more than enough ripple current rating.  The same goes for the output capacitor of a linear regulator.  But the output capacitor or coupling capacitor in a switching regulator is an entirely different matter; there, the ESR and ripple current rating is what matters and the capacitance is usually irrelevant.

Quote
I wonder if in 10 or 50 years time, we will see super capacitors, replace rechargeable batteries, in most applications.

Chemical storage simply has the advantage of much higher energy density than electrostatic storage so I doubt it.  Supercapacitors have their place but it is not in replacing batteries except where power density is more important than energy density.

Another severe disadvantage of capacitors compared to batteries in energy storage applications is that their voltage is proportional to the square root of the energy remaining so the circuits have to deal with a wildly varying voltage which in practice means that only a fraction of the capacitor's energy is available.
 

Offline MK14

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Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #153 on: May 27, 2017, 12:13:49 pm »

They seem to be popular, on better quality motherboards.
At the very least, they get rid of the possibility of the liquid electrolyte leaking, since it would then be solid.

The only reason they use them is for their low ESR yielding a high ripple current rating at a given cost.  It became impractical to fit enough aluminum electrolytic capacitors in the area needed to get a low enough ESR and ceramic capacitors would be more expensive.

They are great capacitors but the motherboard makers use them because they are the least expensive solution.

With the trend on motherboards, to need ever increasingly higher currents at ever lower voltages (for the cpu, especially). The low ESR makes a lot of sense.

After so many bad caps were produced, a number of years back (rumored to be caused by the Chinese stealing technical details on how to make good capacitors from the Japanese. But who mistakenly got the chemical mixture wrong, so they tended to not last long, before leaking/breaking). Motherboard manufacture's seem to commonly advertise that they have good quality (solid) capacitors, to avoid or minimize that problem.
 

Online David Hess

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Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #154 on: May 27, 2017, 12:39:08 pm »
With the trend on motherboards, to need ever increasingly higher currents at ever lower voltages (for the cpu, especially). The low ESR makes a lot of sense.

In other designs, the ratio of voltage to current (resistance) of a CPU's power pins would be considered a short circuit.

Quote
After so many bad caps were produced, a number of years back (rumored to be caused by the Chinese stealing technical details on how to make good capacitors from the Japanese. But who mistakenly got the chemical mixture wrong, so they tended to not last long, before leaking/breaking).

Even the good capacitors would fail eventually and solid polymer electrolytic will also eventually fail although not so visibly.  I replaced the capacitors on my Abit BX6 revision 2 system and it works great.  They were not bad; they just eventually wore out.

I think my Intel GX6 server motherboard uses ceramic capacitors on the CPU voltage regulators but that was a cost is no object design.  They might fail but they will not wear out.

Quote
Motherboard manufacture's seem to commonly advertise that they have good quality (solid) capacitors, to avoid or minimize that problem.

That is just good marketing.  What we produce now is new and improved (while what were were producing before is old and inferior) so upgrade now!
 

Offline ali_asadzadeh

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Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #155 on: May 27, 2017, 03:35:30 pm »
A MCU with integrated true bipolar ADC inputs, say +-10V and 16Bit plus and 500KSPS+ of course single supply device say 3.3V
A MCU with integrated RS485 PHY, with integrated  CAN PHY
A MCU with integrated Audio Codec
An ARM Cortex A with integrated  DRAM (more than 1GB) and from a know good brand not bullisht parts from Allwinner with out the real good support
A real good and easy to use OS for the Cortex A, and with easy to learn and ready to go mindset, most of us hate to learn Linux or there is not at least a good,easy to use and solid linux tutorial
A FPGA with lots of resources and affordable prices-- in this world they really need to make it affordable.
A good and reliable China part distributor like Arrow or digikey with price similar to Alibaba :)
A way or a machine to be able to cheaply produce plastic injection molds (under 1500$ or 1000$ )
And finally a real good Image sensor manufacturer without the bullisht  DNA and available parts and datasheets-- everybody know those bastards





« Last Edit: May 27, 2017, 03:37:11 pm by ali_asadzadeh »
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Offline technix

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Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #156 on: May 27, 2017, 04:16:43 pm »
A MCU with integrated true bipolar ADC inputs, say +-10V and 16Bit plus and 500KSPS+ of course single supply device say 3.3V
STM32F373? Not true bipolar though sadly.
A MCU with integrated RS485 PHY, with integrated  CAN PHY
I have never heard of this.
A MCU with integrated Audio Codec
WCH CH563should fot this bill. p.s. That chip also have built-in Ethernet PHY and comes with a pre-assigned MAC.
An ARM Cortex A with integrated  DRAM (more than 1GB) and from a know good brand not bullisht parts from Allwinner with out the real good support
Octavo have some AM335x-based SIP that fits the bill. If you have problems with BGA, you can use AT91SAM9260 which comes in QFP208 and can use SDR SDRAM, which comes in TSOP packages.
A real good and easy to use OS for the Cortex A, and with easy to learn and ready to go mindset, most of us hate to learn Linux or there is not at least a good,easy to use and solid linux tutorial
Most vendors default to one flavor of Linux or another now (especially Android) since that is where the app developers are. Maybe it is time to embrace Linux on Cortex-A. Or contribute to this and this to clone Apple iOS. Or you can cook up your own OS.
A FPGA with lots of resources and affordable prices-- in this world they really need to make it affordable.
Cyclone IV?
A good and reliable China part distributor like Arrow or digikey with price similar to Alibaba :)
There isn't. Even natives have to navigate the complexity of Alibaba.
A way or a machine to be able to cheaply produce plastic injection molds (under 1500$ or 1000$ )
3D printing.
And finally a real good Image sensor manufacturer without the bullisht  DNA and available parts and datasheets-- everybody know those bastards
Ditto for display modules.
 

Offline Richard Crowley

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Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #157 on: May 27, 2017, 05:06:38 pm »
Replacement for LM3915/3916  Might be able to identify a tiny microcontroller that could be programmed to almost provide the same functionality(?)
 

Offline Kjelt

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Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #158 on: May 27, 2017, 05:17:44 pm »
Quote
A MCU with integrated RS485 PHY
The ST Uarts do have a RS485 data enable signal but the driver it self is always extern. Because RS485 is often used in long distances and industrial environments it is not uncommon to see in industrial device this driver as a dip package in a socket so with damage it can be replaced.
 

Offline ali_asadzadeh

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Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #159 on: May 27, 2017, 06:36:16 pm »
technix
Thanks, but did you even read it carefully? STM32F373 it's not bipolar input!

Quote
I have never heard of this.
it's a wish list and I'm sure you never heard of it,

Quote
WCH CH563
Can we see the datasheet in English?

Quote
Cyclone IV?
Not affordable enough.

Quote
3D printing.
a plastic  injection is far superior to 3D printing rubbish ;)

Quote
Ditto for display modules.
what's Ditto? do you have a link? we need image sensors with real datasheet and availability
You can order parts from www.ASiDesigner.com
we are a wire-based company
 

Offline SeanB

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Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #160 on: May 27, 2017, 07:52:39 pm »
Large-value (~10 uF) *medium* ESR ceramic capacitors. Most existing ones have frustratingly low ESR for bypassing applications.

Not if your control loop is properly designed. There are tons of LDO/SMPS controllers that can operate at nearly zero ESR, as long as they're designed properly.

What's that got to do with the price of fish? There are plenty of places one needs some bypassing (with the damping of moderate ESR) that are nowhere near a PSU or its control loop, or a control loop of any kind.

simply put a space for a zero ohm or whatever desired ESR value SMD resistor in series with the capacitor. Instant controllable ESR and also a test point, just costs a single resistor.
 

Online David Hess

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Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #161 on: May 27, 2017, 10:33:18 pm »
A MCU with integrated true bipolar ADC inputs, say +-10V and 16Bit plus and 500KSPS+ of course single supply device say 3.3V

That kind of resolution in a sampling ADC conflicts with having a noisy microcontroller in the same package.

Quote
A MCU with integrated RS485 PHY, with integrated  CAN PHY

It is less expensive to have a separate PHY because the most economical IC processes for microcontrollers do not support the interface voltages required.

Quote
A MCU with integrated Audio Codec

I thought they have these but I guess not.  Still, lots of microcontrollers can directly interface with cheap external audio codecs.

Quote
An ARM Cortex A with integrated  DRAM (more than 1GB) and from a know good brand not bullishit parts from Allwinner with out the real good support

Because high density DRAM processes are specialized, it is more economical to include the DRAM as a separate die in the same package like with the Raspberry Pi processor.
 
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Offline technix

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Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #162 on: May 28, 2017, 01:28:16 am »
technix
Thanks, but did you even read it carefully? STM32F373 it's not bipolar input!
I know. Sore point. Ouch.
Quote
I have never heard of this.
it's a wish list and I'm sure you never heard of it,
You get me.
Quote
WCH CH563
Can we see the datasheet in English?
I don't think they have one. If you need one I can ccok one up for you, but allow me to first cook up a board and give it a jog (I do have samples but not eval kits.)
Quote
Cyclone IV?
Not affordable enough.
Sadly. Maybe a Cyclone IV coupled to a STM32F103VE/Allwinner V3s?
Quote
3D printing.
a plastic  injection is far superior to 3D printing rubbish ;)
Making the mold costs a crazy lot of $$$. For one-off products you are more likely than not stuck to CNC and 3D printing.
Quote
Ditto for display modules.
what's Ditto? do you have a link? we need image sensors with real datasheet and availability
I mean that display module manufacturers have the same nasty habit of keeping their products shrouded in NDA. A lot of nice chips suffer from the same NDA problem (I am looking at you sir, ATECC508A.)
 

Offline helius

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Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #163 on: May 28, 2017, 02:01:42 am »
a plastic  injection is far superior to 3D printing rubbish ;)
Making the mold costs a crazy lot of $$$. For one-off products you are more likely than not stuck to CNC and 3D printing.
You can sometimes 3d-print a mold when using spin casting. See http://www.stratasys.com/solutions/additive-manufacturing/tooling/spin-casting
It is not quite as flexible as injection molding but much cheaper.
 

Online BrianHG

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Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #164 on: May 28, 2017, 01:17:53 pm »
A MCU with integrated RS485 PHY, with integrated  CAN PHY

I used a PIC with comparitor inputs with series & termination resistors to protect the IOs from surge.  When in input mode, the 2 comparitor inputs act as a true authentic differential receiver, then to transmit, I switch the 2 comparitor inputs to outputs to create a differential line driver with microchip's +/-50ma per pin output drive.  Of course, I had to use a software serializer/de-serializer, but, with this, I had an 8 story apartment building with 20 shared addressable nodes temperature sensor/light control/alarm buttons running on phone wires at 19200 baud error free.
__________
BrianHG.
 

Offline jonovid

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Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #165 on: July 05, 2017, 09:18:44 pm »
convex OLED video screens for retro or reproduction video arcade machines.
the need for a 29” CRT Monitor emulator using convex 25"  - 29” OLED 800 x 600 video screen.
the OLED retro video screen needs to have the look and feel of a convex CRT Monitor without the weight or 1980s power consumption.

original CRT Monitor is preferred in a true reproduction of a arcade machine.

« Last Edit: July 06, 2017, 01:24:48 am by jonovid »
Hobby of evil genius      basic knowledge of electronics
 

Offline coppice

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Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #166 on: July 05, 2017, 11:43:06 pm »
Electrolytic Capacitors (i.e. low cost, relatively high capacitance value) which DON'T leak and/or significantly deteriorate, over a large number of years.

Tantalum and aluminum capacitors with solid polymer electrolyte are available. Well known types include Sanyo OS-CON and others.

Solid polymer electrolytic capacitors have their own wearout mechanism; the polymer degrades following the usual Arrhenius equation halving their operating lifetime for every 10C temperature rise.  Their big advantage is lower ESR yielding lower power dissipation and operating temperature.
Most motherboards using solid aluminium capacitors claim an operating life of 50k to 100k hours (5 to 10 years). I don't know what temperatures they are basing those estimates on. They don't seem to say.

When we first started using Philips solid aluminium caps for telecoms equipment, in the 80s, we were building for a minimum life of 15 years continuous operation with only passive cooling. Things could get pretty warm in some telephone exchanges.
The closest thing to an electrolytic capacitor which does not wear out is a solid or wet tantalum capacitor (1) but these have their own issues and high price.  In practice an almost arbitrarily long operating life can be gained using normal aluminum electrolytic or polymer electrolytic capacitors with suitable derating.

(1) And niobium oxide capacitors?
Tantalums have a long overall life, but both solid and wet ones are subject to occasional whisker shorts. With a beefy power supply these will self correct. With a very low capacity supply they may form a permanent short. Either way, they can make a telephone exchange crash, and were in fact found to be the main cause of such crashes. We first adopted solid aluminiums to avoid our exchange equipment hiccuping like that, and it did seem to be an effective cure.
 
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Offline mariush

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Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #167 on: July 06, 2017, 12:45:31 am »
There's a different formula used to approximate life of polymer capacitors.  Can't use the electrolytic formula (double life for every 10c less)

Here's a link : http://www.illinoiscapacitor.com/tech-center/life-calculators.aspx

Polymer caps:



Radial/SMD electrolytic  (but like i said, you can simplify it to double life every 10c decrease):



 
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Offline technix

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Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #168 on: July 07, 2017, 12:40:06 pm »
I'd like to see a Zynq in a stacked RAM package.
Seconded. Accepting PoP packages or embedding chips as MCM isn't that hard, and thermals can be managed by embedding the RAM dies in the same way as those GPU chips with HBM memory.
 

Offline RobK_NL

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Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #169 on: July 08, 2017, 12:26:11 am »
4. CdS cells - Is there really a problem with hermetically sealed CdS?
Plenty of them available
All the "NSL" types are hermetically sealed.
Tell us what problem you want to solve, not what solution you're having problems with
 

Offline GarthyD

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Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #170 on: July 09, 2017, 12:57:19 pm »
A few rambling thoughts:

- A runtime-reconfigurable CPLD. It starts up with the image last flashed via a dedicated programming connection (say, JTAG) to its internal flash. Groups of pins and cells can be locked into fixed configurations via security bits in the flash. It is through this initial image and a non-programming connection that you reconfigure the remaining cells (say, via SPI). The locking protects the runtime changes from being destructive, such as outputting on a pin that on your board goes to another output. Specification is open enough that you don't need a specialised tool to make these runtime changes.

- A conductor/insulator/conductor "sandwich" with a module coming out of the side that you could attach two jumper wires to. To use, you desolder an IC lead from its pad, insert the "sandwich", resolder, and now you can insert something in series between the IC lead and the pad (eg. to measure current). Bonus points if it comes with a tiny DIP switch that you can switch to keep it connected when not in use.

- Readily available extremely short 2.54mm female/female headers to adapt male headers/jumpers to male headers/jumpers, as well as allowing you to adapt a through-hole component to a male header pin where distance matters (eg. crystal, cap on a breakout board).

- A Surface mount 2.54mm male/female header that is insulated underneath, with a small side tab that you could solder to an existing populated SMT pad on a PCB, to add jumper-wire-friendly connection to a prototype PCB that you left out. I have no idea how you'd secure it for disconnections though.

- Minimal through-hole breakouts customised for each MCU produced with space to put caps and crystals optimally as standard. The design is released so anyone can make them. Purchasable assembled and unassembled.

- Some of the more interesting battery charger plus voltage regulator ICs with proper leads rather than being mostly leadless.

- Fully-assembled boost converter module as a through-hole component with no layout requirements. Five pins: In, out, ground, enable, and a resistor to set voltage.

- Small breadboard with no valley so that you can plug a two row 2.54mm connector directly into the middle via male headers and have connections heading outward from each individual pin.

- A breadboard that can grasp short pins.

- Jumper wire with small (eg. 22 ohm) series resistors located near either one or both ends.

- A small inexpensive reprogrammable eight-pin device that does nothing but apply a lookup table to a fixed number of input pins to produce output for a fixed number of output pins. Pins might be VCC, GND, three inputs, two outputs, programming pin. Like a small primitive CPLD.

- Power-pooling IC that accepts a few power sources and outputs uninterrupted power even as the sources are connected and disconnected. One source assumes a single-cell Li-Po and minimises the voltage drop. The battery source is isolated if the other sources are providing power. An output pin indicates if we are running from battery or not.

- An external power detect/LED IC for projects that use a battery. Overvoltage-protected input detects external power. Output (eg. to MCU) to indicate when external power is detected. Open drain output to connect to a LED. Input (eg. from MCU) that overrides the LED output, either on or off. IC is ultra-low-power when LED off and no external power.

- Shift register where every two bits controls what is connected to one pin: Either nothing, a weak pullup, or a weak pulldown.

- Inexpensive through-hole P-channel MOSFETS (if it's 6c for SOT-23, why am I paying $1.60 for something comparable through-hole?).

- A micro USB B connector with long leads for hand-soldering that is actually sold anywhere.

- Small SMT crystals with leads or at the very least hand-solderable pads on the side of decent size.

- A small surface-mount component (0603 or much smaller) that conducts as shipped but you can deliberately break the connection with a small tool, magnifier, and steady hand. Essentially a tiny dip switch with default on.

- A module that you can solder on to standard footprints that contains an upper module with the same footprint but with longer pads. ;)

- An adapter that has 2.54mm male header pins on one side (say, 2x5) and individually spring-loaded pins on the other that will make contact with a wide range of PCB hole sizes. The header pins then go to a cable. For testing before soldering real headers on.

- Jumper wire with one end having some kind of connector that lets you make secure, but temporary connections with a plated through-hole of various sizes *vertically* at most points on a PCB.

That was actually quite fun to write up. :) I'm sure quite a few of these exist already.
 

Offline technix

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Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #171 on: July 09, 2017, 01:59:40 pm »
A few rambling thoughts:

- A runtime-reconfigurable CPLD. It starts up with the image last flashed via a dedicated programming connection (say, JTAG) to its internal flash. Groups of pins and cells can be locked into fixed configurations via security bits in the flash. It is through this initial image and a non-programming connection that you reconfigure the remaining cells (say, via SPI). The locking protects the runtime changes from being destructive, such as outputting on a pin that on your board goes to another output. Specification is open enough that you don't need a specialised tool to make these runtime changes.

- A conductor/insulator/conductor "sandwich" with a module coming out of the side that you could attach two jumper wires to. To use, you desolder an IC lead from its pad, insert the "sandwich", resolder, and now you can insert something in series between the IC lead and the pad (eg. to measure current). Bonus points if it comes with a tiny DIP switch that you can switch to keep it connected when not in use.

- Readily available extremely short 2.54mm female/female headers to adapt male headers/jumpers to male headers/jumpers, as well as allowing you to adapt a through-hole component to a male header pin where distance matters (eg. crystal, cap on a breakout board).

- A Surface mount 2.54mm male/female header that is insulated underneath, with a small side tab that you could solder to an existing populated SMT pad on a PCB, to add jumper-wire-friendly connection to a prototype PCB that you left out. I have no idea how you'd secure it for disconnections though.

- Minimal through-hole breakouts customised for each MCU produced with space to put caps and crystals optimally as standard. The design is released so anyone can make them. Purchasable assembled and unassembled.

- Some of the more interesting battery charger plus voltage regulator ICs with proper leads rather than being mostly leadless.

- Fully-assembled boost converter module as a through-hole component with no layout requirements. Five pins: In, out, ground, enable, and a resistor to set voltage.

- Small breadboard with no valley so that you can plug a two row 2.54mm connector directly into the middle via male headers and have connections heading outward from each individual pin.

- A breadboard that can grasp short pins.

- Jumper wire with small (eg. 22 ohm) series resistors located near either one or both ends.

- A small inexpensive reprogrammable eight-pin device that does nothing but apply a lookup table to a fixed number of input pins to produce output for a fixed number of output pins. Pins might be VCC, GND, three inputs, two outputs, programming pin. Like a small primitive CPLD.

- Power-pooling IC that accepts a few power sources and outputs uninterrupted power even as the sources are connected and disconnected. One source assumes a single-cell Li-Po and minimises the voltage drop. The battery source is isolated if the other sources are providing power. An output pin indicates if we are running from battery or not.

- An external power detect/LED IC for projects that use a battery. Overvoltage-protected input detects external power. Output (eg. to MCU) to indicate when external power is detected. Open drain output to connect to a LED. Input (eg. from MCU) that overrides the LED output, either on or off. IC is ultra-low-power when LED off and no external power.

- Shift register where every two bits controls what is connected to one pin: Either nothing, a weak pullup, or a weak pulldown.

- Inexpensive through-hole P-channel MOSFETS (if it's 6c for SOT-23, why am I paying $1.60 for something comparable through-hole?).

- A micro USB B connector with long leads for hand-soldering that is actually sold anywhere.

- Small SMT crystals with leads or at the very least hand-solderable pads on the side of decent size.

- A small surface-mount component (0603 or much smaller) that conducts as shipped but you can deliberately break the connection with a small tool, magnifier, and steady hand. Essentially a tiny dip switch with default on.

- A module that you can solder on to standard footprints that contains an upper module with the same footprint but with longer pads. ;)

- An adapter that has 2.54mm male header pins on one side (say, 2x5) and individually spring-loaded pins on the other that will make contact with a wide range of PCB hole sizes. The header pins then go to a cable. For testing before soldering real headers on.

- Jumper wire with one end having some kind of connector that lets you make secure, but temporary connections with a plated through-hole of various sizes *vertically* at most points on a PCB.

That was actually quite fun to write up. :) I'm sure quite a few of these exist already.
I wonder if the MCP23S17 counts as a shift register with pin I/O controls? It is effectively two PIC16 parallel I/O blocks hooked to a SPI bus.
 
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Offline bjcuizon

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Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #172 on: July 09, 2017, 02:39:59 pm »
An 0805 smd resistor with 2W power handling and an electrolytic cap that doesn't die in any way possible.
Don't mess with an Electronics Engineer, it Megahertz!
 

Offline technix

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Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #173 on: July 09, 2017, 02:56:30 pm »
An 0805 smd resistor with 2W power handling and an electrolytic cap that doesn't die in any way possible.
Just add heatsinks.
 

Offline GarthyD

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Re: Components you wish existed.
« Reply #174 on: July 09, 2017, 03:25:58 pm »
- Shift register where every two bits controls what is connected to one pin: Either nothing, a weak pullup, or a weak pulldown.
I wonder if the MCP23S17 counts as a shift register with pin I/O controls? It is effectively two PIC16 parallel I/O blocks hooked to a SPI bus.

Thanks for the suggestion. A GPIO expander would certainly solve the same problems, and the MCP23S17 certainly covers the pull-up side of the equation. Or, use the outputs and add a suitable resistor and use it to pull in either direction.

I think my ideal component in this case would be one that just had configurable pull-ups and pull-downs and had a price to match. Something simpler and cheaper than a full GPIO expander but a bit more flexible than a fixed pullup/down resistor.

 


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