Author Topic: Different die pictures  (Read 7787 times)

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Offline SYJON

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Re: Different die pictures
« Reply #75 on: March 16, 2021, 09:25:14 am »
How about 555?
 


Offline SYJON

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Re: Different die pictures
« Reply #77 on: March 16, 2021, 09:30:58 am »
Exactly! Love that  8) ;D
 

Offline Renate

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Re: Different die pictures
« Reply #78 on: March 16, 2021, 04:21:28 pm »
I hope that we'll get some good shots of eInk display panels soon.
Here is a (low quality) preview of a eInk "Carta" 300 DPI display driver chip.
A flex PC comes in from the top, the screen is on the bottom.
Between those two is an IC built on the glass.
This one has some sort of hard reflective cap stuck to it. It doesn't come off with a heat gun. Or a knife.
I have another one that has some sort of white silicone on top of the IC.
 

Offline Noopy

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Re: Different die pictures
« Reply #79 on: March 23, 2021, 04:07:48 pm »


Sensitec builds some interesting current sensors that are based on the GMR effect: CDS4000 and CFS1000 for example.
They use the compensation methode. Compensating the field of the current which you want to measure.
(pictures taken from the datasheet)




Here you see a module apparently similar to the modules used in most of the Sensitec current sensors.
The small die is the GMR sensor, the big die does the signal processing.
The black blocks are magnets that gives you an offset so you can meassure positive and negative currents.




The GMR sensor is called ADK769. With this name you find some information, for example the IEEE article "High accuracy, high bandwidth magnetoresistive current sensors for spacecraft power electronics". With the help of the IEEE article we know that the two contact on the right generate the compensation field. Us1 and Us2 is the supply of the wheatstone bridge and Uo1 and Uo2 gives you the voltage proportional to the magnetic field.





The upper dark layer conducts the compensation current. The GMR elements are under the barber pole structures.
The barber pole structures are placed directly on the GMR and conduct current quite well. That gives you an angular current flow which modifies the characteristic of the GMR element so you get a linear behaviour and more sensitivity at low fields.




Here you see the current path of the compensation current.








A wheatstone bridge is quite symmetrical and robust against noise and drifts. Nevertheless Sensitec splitted the GMR elements in four parts and mixed them together probably to get it even more robust.




On the signal processing die in the upper half there is an analog part and in the lower half is a digital part.




Hello Simon!  ;D




There are four unused bondpads and 14 (!) pads each connected to something that looks quite like a fuse.




On the right side there are the big transistors for the field compensation.
The big structures on the left side could be a voltage regulator for the wheatstone bridge.


More pictures here:

https://www.richis-lab.de/hall03.htm

 :-/O
 
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Offline Noopy

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Re: Different die pictures
« Reply #80 on: April 01, 2021, 07:39:27 pm »
One step forward in the GDR digital telephone system. We have seen the NF-Filter U1001 (https://www.richis-lab.de/phone01.htm). The next IC in the line is the U1011, a Coder/Decoder which does the digital conversion respectively the analog conversion.




The resolution of the DAC and the ADC is 13Bit. These 13Bit are compressed to 8Bit what is enough for a telephone system.






The die is 5,4mm x 3,4mm.




Looks like a revision 2...




Interesting: There are "normal" testpads and smaller testpads. I assume the smaller ones were used in development.




Nice: A Switched-Capacitor-DAC




There are three transistors, one for Ref+, one for Ref- and one vor GND.




Above the GND transistor there is a fourth small transistor connecting GND with a big metal stripe. The stripe is connected to the control circuit but most notably to a big area above the GND transistor. In the next pictures we will see that this structure somehow reduces the resistance of the transistor. I assume the additional transistor modifies the body potential.




The capacitors are the same as in the U1001.




It´s a Split-Switched-Capacitor-ADC. It is split in two halfes. The MSB-DAC contains seven segments, the LSB-DAC contains six segments. The capacitor ratio is 64:32:16:8:4:2:1 then there is a small coupling capacitor and then there is the LSB-DAC with the ratio 32:16:8:4:2:2... ...well it looks like this but I´m not perfectly sure with the ...2:2.
The transistor ratios are similar but there is a change in the ratios where the additional transistor at the GND transistor comes into play.




That looks like the output opamp.




That seems to be a bias circuit for the output opamp and the comparator of the SAR-ADC. The datasheet describes an automatic offset compensation.  :-/O




It looks like they kept an option to adjust the offset from outside the die.




With nearly the same DAC they built a SAR-ADC.




Here we have two more switches for the analog signal (because you have to switch positive and negativ potentials).




That part has to be the comparator.






Interesting: In the digital part there are some small caps integrated in the substrate. It seems like the long way to the supply bondpad had to be compensated.






The digital part is too complex to analyse every function but this looks like the 13Bit/8Bit conversion.




Digital input...




...and digital output.


Here some more pictures:

https://www.richis-lab.de/phone02.htm

 :-/O

Offline Noopy

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Re: Different die pictures
« Reply #81 on: April 08, 2021, 12:11:31 pm »




Ruhla Kaliber 15-02, a small simple digital watch.




Yeah, the battery is leaking a little.  ;D




With the small capacitor at the bottom of the board you can tune the clock.
The quartz is missing.




Here we see the contact rubber for the lcd.
They drilled two holes between the lcd and the capacitor cutting some traces. They needed this connection to galvanise the board with gold. That also a cause for the traces leading to the edge of the board.
There are some interesting dendrites at the capacitor. Perhaps because of the electrolyte?






The LCD...








They potted the controller into the PCB.
After bonding the die they took a black lid on top of the board. The bondwires get bent but it seems that was no problem.




The die is coated (2,9mm x 2,8mm).






The service manual states the controller is a KB1004CHL5-4. Probably it´s a КБ1004ХЛ5-4. Russia had a lot of clock controllers have a 1004ХЛ in their name.




A lot of the area is occupied by some similar structures, probably the lcd drivers.




There are strange structures in the middle of the die. Perhaps that is something like a mask programmed melody generator for the alarm.


https://www.richis-lab.de/clock01.htm


 :-/O

Offline Noopy

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Re: Different die pictures
« Reply #82 on: April 12, 2021, 08:05:50 pm »
As part of the GDR digital telephone system we have seen the filter circuit U1001 (https://www.richis-lab.de/phone01.htm) and the PCM-coder/decoder (https://www.richis-lab.de/phone02.htm). Now here we have the U1500PC050 which controls the signal flow.




The die is 5,9mm x 5,9mm.




The U1500PC050 is based on the Zeiss U1500. With the U1500 system you can built an ASIC out of standard cells.




Some structures to check the process quality.




The U1500PC050 was designed in the "Institut für Nachrichtentechnik".






The input bondpads are connected to the clamping diodes with a series resistor. The signal is buffered in a push-pull-stage and then reaches the internal circuit.
Around the bondpads there seems to be some kind of additional isolation.






A small push-pull output stage.






There are five bigger output stages. Different to the smaller output stages the highside and the lowside transistor are controlled with two lines. There is probably a tristate mode. That makes sense because there is also an input circuit connected to these output stages.




There is an exclusive supply bondpad at the big output stages.




In the logic block we find the same capacitors as in the U1011 (https://www.richis-lab.de/phone02.htm).


https://www.richis-lab.de/phone03.htm

 :-/O
 
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Offline Noopy

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Re: Different die pictures
« Reply #83 on: April 17, 2021, 07:34:19 pm »
Today I have a special Fluke analog switch for you. There was already a thread about it so I placed the pictures there:

https://www.eevblog.com/forum/testgear/replacement-for-fluke-700013-ic-(quad-spst-analog-switch)/msg3551343/#msg3551343

 :-/O

Offline Noopy

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Re: Different die pictures
« Reply #84 on: April 23, 2021, 08:23:15 pm »


The NEC µPD7220 is the world´s first graphic processor. The µPD7220A is the second generation.
The µPD7220AD is the ceramic package. -2 stands for the fastest version. Probably they did some binning.






The die is 4,3mm x 4,3mm. The datasheet explains that a NMOS process was used.
In the 1981 IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference the µPD7220 was introduced. The first generation had a die size of 7mm x 7mm. They did quite some shrinking to get to the µPD7220A.






Designed 1983...




HGDC? Some enigneers?












Some test structures...






The computer system bus and the graphic memory bus IOs are equipped with their own ground rail that is connected to the package ground with two bondwires.




And three more ground wires for the rest of the logic.




The memory blocks are easy to spot. On the right side there is the FIFO buffer (16x9) and the parameter RAM (16x8). On the left side there is the instruction ROM (128x14).


Some more pictures here:

https://www.richis-lab.de/GraKa01.htm

 :-/O
 
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