Author Topic: Need help designing a load selector!  (Read 682 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Online rdl

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 2928
  • Country: us
Re: Need help designing a load selector!
« Reply #25 on: June 01, 2020, 03:41:36 am »
The RGB LEDs im using are like regular LEDs, these just have integrated circuitry that drives the colour changing effect with the internal diodes. It has the same anode and cathode as regular LEDs.

I think this is the problem. You need a standard RGB LED that has individual leads for each color and one common.
 

Offline WyverntekGameRepairs

  • Regular Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 105
  • Country: us
  • MAKE: My Day
Re: Need help designing a load selector!
« Reply #26 on: June 01, 2020, 05:56:37 pm »
The RGB LEDs im using are like regular LEDs, these just have integrated circuitry that drives the colour changing effect with the internal diodes. It has the same anode and cathode as regular LEDs.

I think this is the problem. You need a standard RGB LED that has individual leads for each color and one common.

Bad idea. I don’t have the circuitry to drive a standard RGB LED in such a way that it fades from colour to colour softly. I could use capacitors and a logic array to drive the register, but that would take more power. I’m trying to keep this as low power as possible.

Another option to drive the LEDs is the  ULN2003B  darlington transistor array.
That could definitely work! I do happen to have a couple laying around.
-Sterling Ordes
Wyverntek Game Repairs
(Business License Pending)
 

Online rdl

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 2928
  • Country: us
Re: Need help designing a load selector!
« Reply #27 on: Yesterday at 12:12:08 am »
Bad idea. I don’t have the circuitry to drive a standard RGB LED in such a way that it fades from colour to colour softly. I could use capacitors and a logic array to drive the register, but that would take more power. I’m trying to keep this as low power as possible.

It's not an "idea".

I sounds as if your LEDs are "attention grabber" type with only two leads, a power and ground connection (anode/cathode), which go through a preset color-changing/fading/blinking/whatever sequence when power is applied. If that is the case, you will never be able to do what you want. The only control you have over what they do is turning them on and off.
 

Offline MarkF

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 1660
  • Country: us
Re: Need help designing a load selector!
« Reply #28 on: Yesterday at 01:30:45 am »
Pretty lights:   https://youtu.be/X4d-Nk955JE?t=887


The only control you have over what they do is turning them on and off.

Turning them On and Off is ALL he wants to do.
« Last Edit: Yesterday at 01:34:49 am by MarkF »
 

Online rdl

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 2928
  • Country: us
Re: Need help designing a load selector!
« Reply #29 on: Yesterday at 02:02:35 am »
No.
He said "Here is the sequence I am going for:  Red, Green, Blue, RGB, Off."

If the LEDs he has are what I think, that can't be done. However, some clarification as to what he is actually using would help.
Quote

The RGB LEDs im using are like regular LEDs, these just have integrated circuitry that drives the colour changing effect with the internal diodes. It has the same anode and cathode as regular LEDs.

Something similar to this is what it sounds like he has.



 

Offline MarkF

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 1660
  • Country: us
Re: Need help designing a load selector!
« Reply #30 on: Yesterday at 02:44:23 am »
No.
He said "Here is the sequence I am going for:  Red, Green, Blue, RGB, Off."

If the LEDs he has are what I think, that can't be done. However, some clarification as to what he is actually using would help.

Yes.
"Here is the sequence I am going for:Only when he pushes the button!
There are three jellybean LEDs (red, green and blue) and one color fading RGB LED.
The sequence is to switch to a different LED.  Not to change the LED's color.


Quote
The RGB LEDs im using are like regular LEDs, these just have integrated circuitry that drives the colour changing effect with the internal diodes. It has the same anode and cathode as regular LEDs.

He only has one of these.  What he is calling the RGB LED.
Again, the other three LEDs are standard red, green and blue ones.

 
The following users thanked this post: WyverntekGameRepairs

Online rdl

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 2928
  • Country: us
Re: Need help designing a load selector!
« Reply #31 on: Yesterday at 03:14:23 am »
Ah, okay. I think the lack of any kind of diagram or schematic in the first post threw me off. I never saw anything but RGB mentioned. Too bad he has no 4017 in stock, would be basically a one chip solution.
 

Offline WyverntekGameRepairs

  • Regular Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 105
  • Country: us
  • MAKE: My Day
Re: Need help designing a load selector!
« Reply #32 on: Yesterday at 03:18:49 pm »
Ran into an issue as well that I have fixed. Noise was getting bad on the clock input, causing erroneous signal to the chip, even if I just put my hand close to the floating lead connected to the pin. I coupled the pin to ground using a 6.3v, 10uF tantalum capacitor, and a discharge resistor connected to ground. The positive of the capacitor is connected to the pin and resistor, while the negative is grounded. Simple ESI filter.

Turns out I don’t have the Darlington arrays like I thought, but instead just some LM3046N transistor arrays. Those could have leakage and isolation issues so I’m doubting their use. So for now I’m using simple emitter-biased 2n2222A NPN transistors to drive the LEDs.

Yes.
"Here is the sequence I am going for:Only when he pushes the button!
There are three jellybean LEDs (red, green and blue) and one color fading RGB LED.
The sequence is to switch to a different LED.  Not to change the LED's color.


Quote
The RGB LEDs im using are like regular LEDs, these just have integrated circuitry that drives the colour changing effect with the internal diodes. It has the same anode and cathode as regular LEDs.

He only has one of these.  What he is calling the RGB LED.
Again, the other three LEDs are standard red, green and blue ones.


I have decided to use standard 4-pin common cathode RGB LEDs for this project because they take less space than three standard LEDs. However, for the colour changing RGB LED, I have to use a separate LED with integrated circuitry. In the prototype, I’m using four separate LEDs representing each colour for now just as placeholders. When it comes down to the actual PCB assembly, I will be using the more compact convex RGB LEDs.
Clarifying: The FINAL PRODUCT will have a few pairs of LEDs: Each pair has one STANDARD RGB LED, and one COLOUR CHANGING RGB LED. When I press a button, it will turn on or off certain LEDs in a sequence. That sequence is red, green, blue, colour changing RGB, and off.
The reason I don’t just make a circuit to make the standard RGB LED change colours is because that takes more power. If I didn’t have any power constraints, I would omit the integrated colour-changing LED and just use the one standard RGB LED and just build a circuit to make it change colours when the RGB setting is on.
« Last Edit: Yesterday at 03:28:03 pm by WyverntekGameRepairs »
-Sterling Ordes
Wyverntek Game Repairs
(Business License Pending)
 


Share me

Digg  Facebook  SlashDot  Delicious  Technorati  Twitter  Google  Yahoo
Smf