Author Topic: Sandwizz - the next jumperless breadboard  (Read 1422 times)

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Offline ledtesterTopic starter

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Sandwizz - the next jumperless breadboard
« on: May 11, 2024, 03:28:57 am »
What I gleaned from the video:

- you upload a Kicad schematic / netlist to the breadboard (via USB)
- via a terminal session the breadboard will tell you where to place components
- it can verify placement of components
- the breadboard can provide some components itself - like an op-amp, function generator
- you can stack other modules to the breadboard, e.g. an Arduino Nano module

Update: There's a 3 minute overview video here:

https://youtube.com/watch?v=h3WQmGasE6k

Also, the built-in components include: op-amps, PGAs, IDACs, VDACs, comparators, ADCs, AMuxs and 74-series logic
 (according to https://youtu.be/nU-0VqIi4SA?t=175 ).

Another feature is the ability to stream audio from your computer over the USB connection into your circuit.



« Last Edit: May 11, 2024, 04:17:38 am by ledtester »
 

Offline Sensorcat

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Re: Sandwizz - the next jumperless breadboard
« Reply #1 on: May 11, 2024, 05:42:25 pm »
Breadboards are notorious for causing problems with parasitics inherent to the board design, so it would be essential to provide information on parasitics and the resulting frequency limitations. But similar to so many startups (solar roadways!), zero technical information at present. This is strange especially together with the claim 'professionals' do/will use it.

As far as hobbyists are the target audience, my observation is that too much integration/automation means that people don't learn much and remain dependent. And when they hit the limitations of the product that becomes their world with respect to the hobby, it's over.
 

Online mikeselectricstuff

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Re: Sandwizz - the next jumperless breadboard
« Reply #2 on: May 11, 2024, 05:47:54 pm »
 :palm:
Youtube channel:Taking wierd stuff apart. Very apart.
Mike's Electric Stuff: High voltage, vintage electronics etc.
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Offline SeanB

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Re: Sandwizz - the next jumperless breadboard
« Reply #3 on: May 11, 2024, 09:12:49 pm »
Reminds me of the early electronic fault testing I had when in training. 3 hour test for finding 5 faults (yes they thought this could be difficult) and I sort of set an unofficial record by completing all 5 preset faults in 0.0minutes, as the software only counted in 6 second increments (decimal minutes), per fault, and the 8 relays in it could only realistically give you 8 faults, and you also had jumpers and test points, and could abuse the circuit to find those faults using a scope and multimeter, especially as we had a month to play around with it. Z80 based, and used RS422 serial to connect all the stations together on a 3 wire bus to a PC running the DOS based software. Yes did flip one over and removed the 4 screws, and did a quick reverse engineering to see that in most cases only 4 faults were possible per board that was plugged into the DB25 socket on the top panel.
 

Online Benta

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Offline ledtesterTopic starter

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Re: Sandwizz - the next jumperless breadboard
« Reply #5 on: May 20, 2024, 03:38:00 am »
They announced that they'll be on Kickstarter starting June 4th:

https://www.microaware.com/sandwizz-on-kickstarter/
 

Online MK14

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Re: Sandwizz - the next jumperless breadboard
« Reply #6 on: May 27, 2024, 04:12:57 pm »
After watching some videos, and reading some stuff about this.  Especially the following video:


It seems, all they are doing is have a breadboard with perhaps around 60 separate 'columns' (interconnected sections of a breadboard).  Connect to an I/O line of a library card.  Which seems to be an Arduino, with each of its ports, connected to a separate column of the breadboard.

Which runs on the Arduino, software to check the correct component placement, create the signal generator signals (e.g. PWM outputs), and the various components, internal to their breadboard, are just features of an Arduino's I/O system.

E.g. A to D converters, CLB blocks (small configurable/programmable logic blocks, or even a small FPGA, on some boards, as VHDL seems to be mentioned, somewhere), if present in that MCU/Arduino version (or via software loops), it is not that clear, on their implementation.

I.e. Not really that innovative, as it is just connecting some version of the Arduino (they may offer different versions, later), with a pin of its I/O connected to one of the common (column) connections, on the breadboard.
By 'common' I mean, that if you plug a 40 pin DIP IC, into a standard breadboard.  Each pin, is connected to the other pins, in the same column, until you get to the separating middle section of the breadboard (A diagram would make this much easier to explain).

Then using software running on the Arduino, to 'create' the extra components.

I presume they plan on doing, analogue versions, which using banks of analogue matrix multiplexers, would cope with automatically wiring up analogue circuitry/components, on the breadboard.

As perhaps others in this thread have indicated.  The student, would probably be better off, learning the entire process or properly using a breadboard, along with wiring it up, getting the component placement right, and real life debugging, of why it doesn't work, e.g. a component is the wrong way round or in the wrong place, etc.

I'm not sure that the two inventors of this system, have properly thought this thing through.  As there are so many possible problems with this idea, such as the currents being too high, for analogue multiplexers, the time delays being too long, if software processes signals, possible extra electrical noise and too much stray capacitance/inductance, extra impedance from the multiplexers, and so on.
« Last Edit: May 27, 2024, 04:26:06 pm by MK14 »
 

Offline ledtesterTopic starter

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Re: Sandwizz - the next jumperless breadboard
« Reply #7 on: June 08, 2024, 05:22:30 am »
The Kickstarter has launched:

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/sandwizz/the-sandwizz-breadboard-concept/pledge/new?clicked_reward=false

Some of the rewards:

$97 gets you one Sandwizz breadboard
$130 gets you a Sandwizz breadboard and an Arduino Nano library card (need to supply your own Nano though)
 

Offline coppercone2

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Re: Sandwizz - the next jumperless breadboard
« Reply #8 on: June 08, 2024, 06:39:43 am »
don't know, I can see a breadboard as mental exerciser


maybe you should leave the thinking machine out of this one and spend some time practicing. Its like weight lifting, for your mind


« Last Edit: June 08, 2024, 06:46:56 am by coppercone2 »
 
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