Author Topic: Soldering DFN and QFN devices  (Read 7063 times)

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Offline Chasm

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Soldering DFN and QFN devices
« on: February 22, 2011, 12:36:47 pm »
Hi folks,

how feasible is it to solder DFN and QFN devices on a PCB yourself?
Dead bug method is not possible and the devices have 0.5 mm pitch and an exposed pad.

To tell the truth the exposed pad is my biggest worry at the moment, the distance between the exposed and the other pads seems to be only ~0.6mm. Any chance to get this done without a stencil and junking a dozen boards?
 

Offline allanw

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Re: Soldering DFN and QFN devices
« Reply #1 on: February 22, 2011, 12:47:02 pm »
Definitely doable and probably easier than you'd think with an iron.

Use lots of good flux and it practically solders itself...

I find QFN and DFN easier than QFP packages because there's much less change of bridging. The exposed pad can be difficult without using a heat gun if you do not use a large pad in the center for soldering iron access.

What I like to do is just to wet the iron tip and wipe off most of the solder. Then I touch the tip to a few leads at a time and re-wet it often. This prevents bridging but still provides enough solder.
 

Offline Lance

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Re: Soldering DFN and QFN devices
« Reply #2 on: February 22, 2011, 01:10:33 pm »
I found this video quite informative:

[youtube]c_Qt5CtUlqY[/youtube]
 #include "main.h"
  #include <pic.h>
// #include <killallhumans.h>
 

Online mikeselectricstuff

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Re: Soldering DFN and QFN devices
« Reply #3 on: February 22, 2011, 09:30:40 pm »
Here's a vid I did on this


Another tip is to make sure the pads extend beyond the package, to allow inspection and reflow of individual pins.
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Offline Lance

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Re: Soldering DFN and QFN devices
« Reply #4 on: February 23, 2011, 03:30:40 am »
Here's a vid I did on this


Another tip is to make sure the pads extend beyond the package, to allow inspection and reflow of individual pins.
Would that not end up damaging the underside of the board?
 #include "main.h"
  #include <pic.h>
// #include <killallhumans.h>
 

Online mikeselectricstuff

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Re: Soldering DFN and QFN devices
« Reply #5 on: February 23, 2011, 03:49:51 am »
Here's a vid I did on this


Another tip is to make sure the pads extend beyond the package, to allow inspection and reflow of individual pins.
Would that not end up damaging the underside of the board?
No.
Youtube channel:Taking wierd stuff apart. Very apart.
Mike's Electric Stuff: High voltage, vintage electronics etc.
Day Job: Mostly LEDs
 

Offline Psi

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Re: Soldering DFN and QFN devices
« Reply #6 on: February 23, 2011, 09:48:15 am »
Here's a vid I did on this


Another tip is to make sure the pads extend beyond the package, to allow inspection and reflow of individual pins.
Would that not end up damaging the underside of the board?

remember that the center pad is on the bottom too, so all you're doing is heating up the metal pad underneath
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Offline Lance

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Re: Soldering DFN and QFN devices
« Reply #7 on: February 23, 2011, 03:45:04 pm »
Here's a vid I did on this


Another tip is to make sure the pads extend beyond the package, to allow inspection and reflow of individual pins.
Would that not end up damaging the underside of the board?

remember that the center pad is on the bottom too, so all you're doing is heating up the metal pad underneath
Ah, I see. Doesn't having the pad go all the way through the board introduce design issues? Or does it not matter because those pads usually go through anyways? Doesn't having the metal exposed increase the risk of corrosion?
 #include "main.h"
  #include <pic.h>
// #include <killallhumans.h>
 

Online mikeselectricstuff

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Re: Soldering DFN and QFN devices
« Reply #8 on: February 23, 2011, 08:21:43 pm »
Here's a vid I did on this


Another tip is to make sure the pads extend beyond the package, to allow inspection and reflow of individual pins.
Would that not end up damaging the underside of the board?

remember that the center pad is on the bottom too, so all you're doing is heating up the metal pad underneath
Ah, I see. Doesn't having the pad go all the way through the board introduce design issues? Or does it not matter because those pads usually go through anyways? Doesn't having the metal exposed increase the risk of corrosion?
It is normal to have vias through the centre pad of QFNs - often for thermal and/or ground impedance reasons, but doesn't hurt even if not needed for that, and makes rework easier. Exposed pad isn't an issue as you'd normally used gold finish on a PCB with QFNs as you want a very flat finish, but even if it was silver, it would only tarnish the surface and wouldn't affect the solder joint.
Youtube channel:Taking wierd stuff apart. Very apart.
Mike's Electric Stuff: High voltage, vintage electronics etc.
Day Job: Mostly LEDs
 

Offline Chasm

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Re: Soldering DFN and QFN devices
« Reply #9 on: February 24, 2011, 02:31:59 am »
Thank you.
Especially both videos look promising, it should be possible to get the part soldered even if it is QFN32.

Which is of course the moment you realize that you can't buy the part without throwing 20 Euro into Farnells throat or buying it directly and paying about the same for postage at Freescale.

Annoying since the MC34700 seems to be a nice SMPS regulator that should fit into all current and most future projects at a price point at a ok price...


I'll put the flux question in a new thread.
 


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