Author Topic: The uBeam FAQ  (Read 341606 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Online ebastler

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 2745
  • Country: de
Re: The uBeam FAQ
« Reply #1650 on: May 13, 2019, 12:57:05 am »
Quote
How much would you pay for a non-pharma sleep aid device...?

Oh wow!
They must have observed that the uBeam engineers keep falling asleep in the lab, and have reached the razor-sharp conclusion that ultrasound is sleep-inducing.

 :=\
 
The following users thanked this post: djos

Offline Fungus

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 9557
  • Country: 00
Re: The uBeam FAQ
« Reply #1651 on: May 13, 2019, 05:15:11 am »
What do the 30+ incredibly highly skilled and experienced engineers working at uDream actually do all day.
According to this review from a former employee, it's "Like being paid to sit and witness the ramblings of the mentally ill. "

And they get paid to do it!

If I lived near their building I'd apply for a job there, no problem. Millions of $$$ in VC capital usually means fancy toys, lots of perks and bosses who don't pay much attention to what you're actually doing.
 

Offline Buriedcode

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 1130
  • Country: gb
Re: The uBeam FAQ
« Reply #1652 on: May 13, 2019, 07:17:48 am »
The hubris in that tweet... it implies there there either currently is some form of "device" that can almost instantly put someone to sleep - which would be a pretty powerful non-lethal weapon - or that she fully expects to be able to create one.  And with "zero side-effects".. please, everything has side effects, it's just a question of what the intended purpose is and even then, sleeping tablets have the side effect of "drowsiness".

I'm all for "blue sky thinking", brainstorming and trying to tackle so-called hard problems, but simply picking something almost at random and giving the impression all problems can be solved just with hard work and money (or worse, technology) is at best naive.  She fits right in with the Silicon Valley crowd.  The question is... did Silicon Valley make the Perry? Or does the Perry add to the Silicon Valley?
 

Offline EEVblog

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 28636
  • Country: au
    • EEVblog
Re: The uBeam FAQ
« Reply #1653 on: May 13, 2019, 09:27:58 am »
The hubris in that tweet... it implies there there either currently is some form of "device" that can almost instantly put someone to sleep - which would be a pretty powerful non-lethal weapon - or that she fully expects to be able to create one.  And with "zero side-effects".. please, everything has side effects, it's just a question of what the intended purpose is and even then, sleeping tablets have the side effect of "drowsiness".

My bet would be to put you asleep for plane flights. Huge market for that with nervous flyers.
Imagine if you did a slick Kickstarter video promising that, the millions would roll in.

Quote
I'm all for "blue sky thinking", brainstorming and trying to tackle so-called hard problems, but simply picking something almost at random and giving the impression all problems can be solved just with hard work and money (or worse, technology) is at best naive.  She fits right in with the Silicon Valley crowd.  The question is... did Silicon Valley make the Perry? Or does the Perry add to the Silicon Valley?

Even in the world of silicon valley, she's still in a category of her own:

 

Offline StillTrying

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 1847
  • Country: gb
  • 100% Brand New and HQ. Thanked: 8192 times
Re: The uBeam FAQ
« Reply #1654 on: May 28, 2019, 10:28:32 am »
CML+  That took much longer than I thought it would.
 

Offline sdpkom

  • Regular Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 59
  • Country: de
Re: The uBeam FAQ
« Reply #1655 on: June 06, 2019, 12:34:08 am »
They raised $15m-$25m in the beginning of 2018, so 18 months now.
25 people on Linkedin seem to actually get paid by the company (live nearby, are not known to have been fired from the CEO position, not investors).
Assume an average cost (e.g. salary, rent, travel, everything) of $200-250K/year/employee (it's usually higher but they don't seem to be doing much, so probably on the low cost side), and get a yearly burn rate of $5-6m/year.

They used to have a bit more manpower, and used to seem to do more, so they probably burned $10m until now.
Which gives them 1 year's worth of money in the bank.

In the race between uBeam and Energous to be the first to run out of cash.... currently, I think, Energous has the lead, but it's a close call.
Go Energous go!.

 
The following users thanked this post: PaulReynolds

Online Cerebus

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 3376
  • Country: gb
Re: The uBeam FAQ
« Reply #1656 on: June 06, 2019, 12:58:34 am »
Assume an average cost (e.g. salary, rent, travel, everything) of $200-250K/year/employee (it's usually higher but they don't seem to be doing much, so probably on the low cost side), and get a yearly burn rate of $5-6m/year.

A boss of mine, many years ago, offered me the rule of thumb that you should take someone's salary and triple it to get the complete cost of employing someone including desk, heat, lighting, office rent, taxes, benefits, back office costs etc. etc. Over the years I've found the rule holds pretty well for any office based occupation be it clerk, developer, salesman, engineer, whatever. Doesn't work for factory jobs, builders, groundskeepers or anybody who "actually works for a living".
Anybody got a syringe I can use to squeeze the magic smoke back into this?
 

Offline coppice

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 4222
  • Country: gb
Re: The uBeam FAQ
« Reply #1657 on: June 06, 2019, 04:24:14 am »
Assume an average cost (e.g. salary, rent, travel, everything) of $200-250K/year/employee (it's usually higher but they don't seem to be doing much, so probably on the low cost side), and get a yearly burn rate of $5-6m/year.

A boss of mine, many years ago, offered me the rule of thumb that you should take someone's salary and triple it to get the complete cost of employing someone including desk, heat, lighting, office rent, taxes, benefits, back office costs etc. etc. Over the years I've found the rule holds pretty well for any office based occupation be it clerk, developer, salesman, engineer, whatever. Doesn't work for factory jobs, builders, groundskeepers or anybody who "actually works for a living".
The correct multiplier depends a lot on where you are, but for any one area there is usually a multiplier that works pretty well for most jobs in that area.
 


Share me

Digg  Facebook  SlashDot  Delicious  Technorati  Twitter  Google  Yahoo
Smf